Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Jalopnik)   You need to change your blinker fluid   (jalopnik.com) divider line
    More: Asinine, Lubricant, 2007 singles, Need, Mythology, Internet forum, Internal combustion engine, Technology, Petroleum  
•       •       •

2110 clicks; posted to STEM » on 14 Sep 2021 at 7:02 PM (5 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



80 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
5 days ago  
Blinker Fluid

Amazon is one of the few other laces that stocks it.
 
5 days ago  
Teslas automatically download blinker fluid for you.
 
5 days ago  
Nitrogen in your tires ranks up there as the dumbest.
 
5 days ago  
British cars needed this refilled at minimum every 2,000 miles

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
5 days ago  
Who says 3,000 miles for an oil change?
 
5 days ago  

VisualiseThis: Who says 3,000 miles for an oil change?


People who make their living changing oil.
 
5 days ago  
Most oil manufacturers give their oil a life of around 6 months before it doesn't protect as well.
I go based on the oil manufacturer's guidelines since they made the shiat.
 
5 days ago  

VisualiseThis: Who says 3,000 miles for an oil change?


A shortened oil change interval is one of those things that has made it's way to "myth" and has no boomeranged back. Maybe not as short as 3,000 miles, but A LOT of cars sold nowadays are turbocharged and are hard on engine oil. The manufacturer intervals (and the programming of the oil change monitors) are enough to get you past the warranty.

Solid advice is to change the engine oil more frequently than the longest interval specified in the owner's manual. My car specifies 7,500 miles but I change it every 5,000 miles.
 
5 days ago  

mrmopar5287: VisualiseThis: Who says 3,000 miles for an oil change?

A shortened oil change interval is one of those things that has made it's way to "myth" and has no boomeranged back. Maybe not as short as 3,000 miles, but A LOT of cars sold nowadays are turbocharged and are hard on engine oil. The manufacturer intervals (and the programming of the oil change monitors) are enough to get you past the warranty.

Solid advice is to change the engine oil more frequently than the longest interval specified in the owner's manual. My car specifies 7,500 miles but I change it every 5,000 miles.


And use synthetic oil.
 
5 days ago  

mrmopar5287: Maybe not as short as 3,000 miles, but A LOT of cars sold nowadays are turbocharged and are hard on engine oil. The manufacturer intervals (and the programming of the oil change monitors) are enough to get you past the warranty.


My car is turbocharged, and the manual recommends changing the oil every 10,000 miles. I've been going with every 5k instead. Oil changes aren't that expensive, and I don't see that it really hurts anything to change it more frequently. What would I be trying to prove by trying to ensure I use each batch of oil to the fullest extent possible?
 
5 days ago  

Russ1642: And use synthetic oil.


Absolutely. My car (2018 Chevy Cruze Diesel) requires a very specific rated oil. I have to by dexos2 engine oil and there is usually only one brand choice I can buy - Pennzoil at Wal-Mart for $23 in a 5-quart jug.
 
5 days ago  
I don't even drive 5K miles in a year, so I change my oil every Thanksgiving.
 
5 days ago  

LurkerSupreme: mrmopar5287: Maybe not as short as 3,000 miles, but A LOT of cars sold nowadays are turbocharged and are hard on engine oil. The manufacturer intervals (and the programming of the oil change monitors) are enough to get you past the warranty.

My car is turbocharged, and the manual recommends changing the oil every 10,000 miles. I've been going with every 5k instead. Oil changes aren't that expensive, and I don't see that it really hurts anything to change it more frequently. What would I be trying to prove by trying to ensure I use each batch of oil to the fullest extent possible?


Well, how do you think that oil makes it to the place where it is changed? Is it teleported there? No, it relies on people, trains, and trucks. Plus the extra human resources that now have to satisfy the wishes of customers like you by transporting and stocking the products.

Just like you wouldn't question the medical experts when it comes to the protection of your health, stop questioning the engineers that designed your environment destruction device.

Oh and stop making selfish trips and chauffeuring you children around town.
 
5 days ago  
You don't need that much power. 99% of the time I'm using less than 80hp and I can only open it up on the highway for a few seconds before I'm going fast enough to lose my license.

Car batteries are usually meant for starting, not for running electronics with the engine off. There's a reason RVs and some boats use (or should use) separate deep cycle and starter batteries. My last battery went for ten years before it started to struggle in the winter.

Tires are probably the most important component in your car. It's literally the only thing connecting it to the road so don't cheap out. Tires themselves start to degrade over the course of a few (4-5 but varies based on many factors) years and, in such a case, can suddenly lose grip even if your tread is fine (see Paul Walker).

If you don't know what you are doing, don't do service work yourself. I've heard countless stories of "I replaced X and it didn't fix it, so I replaced Y" (and so on) . They often end up spending more than they would at the "stealership" and justify it with "Paying someone else to replace all these things would have cost so much more so I saved money". I need repairs maybe once every decade because I leave maintenance to the people who do it every day for a living. Works out to maybe $100 a year even with the dealership premium.

Similarly, get important things fixed when you can. Worn or broken parts tend to put a strain on other parts and neglecting something you need to pay for eventually will often end up costing more in the future. "Don't cheap out" is a recurring theme and extremely important when you're piloting a 1.5 ton hunk of metal at 60mph.

Finally, getting a new car isn't necessarily a waste of money. People say "Oh it loses X% of its value the moment you drive it off the lot" yet I've never seen that mythical car for sale. You only lose that X% immediately if you decide to sell it immediately. Most late-model used cars have premium features that make it more expensive than a new one if you don't need those features and statistics are skewed by high-depreciation cars (I can buy a ten year old BMW for slightly less than a five year old Subaru? A dirt-cheap Dodge Dart/Caliber/etc? What a value! ). Depreciation exists for a reason and you have to ask yourself "Where did that value go?"
 
5 days ago  

falkone32: "Oh it loses X% of its value the moment you drive it off the lot"


Bring a car back to the dealership after owning it for 6 months and it's lost thousands of dollars right off the top. Go look at used cars on the dealer lot and the same car used for 6 months and a few thousand miles is priced at about 99% of MSRP for a new model.

Aside from that, this pandemic has done a number to used car prices. A friend of mine has a Kia Telluride that is 18 months old. It was the hottest thing to get (still is), he had to stalk one being delivered to a dealership and show up at opening hour to tell them he was buying it, and pretty much pay about MSRP. Now he finds the value of the car is higher than the MSRP he paid because of all the shortages.
 
5 days ago  

StoPPeRmobile: Well, how do you think that oil makes it to the place where it is changed? Is it teleported there? No, it relies on people, trains, and trucks. Plus the extra human resources that now have to satisfy the wishes of customers like you by transporting and stocking the products.

Just like you wouldn't question the medical experts when it comes to the protection of your health, stop questioning the engineers that designed your environment destruction device.

Oh and stop making selfish trips and chauffeuring you children around town.


I don't question medical experts, I don't have kids, and I don't make all that many trips. Plus I don't think an extra oil change or two on my behalf makes as monumental a difference on how much oil the oil change shops go through as you make it sound.

I hope you manage to find some ivermectin for your high horse, I hear that thanks to a bunch of idiots it's in short supply lately.
 
5 days ago  

LurkerSupreme: Plus I don't think an extra oil change or two on my behalf makes as monumental a difference


https://www.theonion.com/how-bad-for-​t​he-environment-can-throwing-away-one-p​last-1819571260
 
5 days ago  

Russ1642: Nitrogen in your tires ranks up there as the dumbest.


"air" is 78% nitrogen, correct? I know there are benefits to removing oxygen from stored cans of finishing materials by blowing in nitrogen from an aerosol can, but I have never seen an explanation for why anyone needs to do that for tires.
 
5 days ago  

mrmopar5287: VisualiseThis: Who says 3,000 miles for an oil change?

A shortened oil change interval is one of those things that has made it's way to "myth" and has no boomeranged back. Maybe not as short as 3,000 miles, but A LOT of cars sold nowadays are turbocharged and are hard on engine oil. The manufacturer intervals (and the programming of the oil change monitors) are enough to get you past the warranty.

Solid advice is to change the engine oil more frequently than the longest interval specified in the owner's manual. My car specifies 7,500 miles but I change it every 5,000 miles.


It's interesting how people think like this. They try to optimize the length of time (or number of miles) before changing the oil. Some might choose to try more carefully, others put only premium oil, others make sure to change the oil themselves...

But what people don't generally do is think outside the box and consider, "What can I do to not have to change oil AT ALL?" And that would be using an electric vehicle. An EV has no oil change schedule because it doesn't have any oil to change. And then, the next step is to only use a vehicle when needed, meaning renting an autonomous vehicle when needed. By doing so, one doesn't have to pay $30K for the car; just $3/ride.
 
5 days ago  
Knew a guy who left the original oil in his vehicle for 75,000 miles. Took it back to the dealership because it was "running sluggish". I was told the oil came out like thick syrup.
 
5 days ago  

mrmopar5287: Russ1642: And use synthetic oil.

Absolutely. My car (2018 Chevy Cruze Diesel) requires a very specific rated oil. I have to by dexos2 engine oil and there is usually only one brand choice I can buy - Pennzoil at Wal-Mart for $23 in a 5-quart jug.


Back in the late 70s, Mobil 1 was the only synthetic available. My roommate swore by it, and since our cars sat outside during the winter, it was a pretty good test of the low temperature viscosity claims. His gotdammed Saab started every morning that my car just refused to light off. I have been using synthetic oil ever since. Also key to longer change intervals is using a good, vs. a cheap oil filter.
 
5 days ago  

pehvbot: VisualiseThis: Who says 3,000 miles for an oil change?

People who make their living changing oil.


My Honda counts down "% oil life" on its own, and it more or less matches up with the sticker that the Honda garage I go to puts on my windshield.  It works out to about 4,000 miles.

A myth I would like to see confirmed or denied from an authoritative source:  That using the 3, 2, or 1 on your automatic transmission for a long descent is somehow "not the same" as downshifting in a manual transmission car under the same circumstances, and you should just ride the brake instead.

In the state where I live, a "long descent" can mean 6,600 feet over 28 miles.  There are those (including my dad) who say "I would rather buy new brake pads than a new engine/transmission", while high school driving instructors say "If you finish using up your brakes halfway down the mountain, what are you gonna do then?"

One data point--they build these things for trucks that discover they have no more brakes left:
cdn.summitdaily.comView Full Size


Another weird observation:  Driving back to Denver from the mountains one Christmas, I had the car in low gear such that I didn't need to use the brakes hardly at all (manual transmission this time) nor did I need to use the gas, and I noticed that the heat eventually went away.  The engine had no waste heat to give.  I had always assumed that when you used the engine to slow down the car on a long descent, all that gravitational potential energy ended up as waste heat in the engine and the engine cooling system dealt with it.  Instead, the waste heat must have been going out the tailpipe...or accumulating in the transmission.
 
5 days ago  

dericwater: But what people don't generally do is think outside the box and consider, "What can I do to not have to change oil AT ALL?" And that would be using an electric vehicle.


I wanted a Chevy Bolt EV.

Two major problems:
1. Expense - I didn't qualify for the tax credit.
2. Charging - I live in an apartment and both of the free chargers at my work are broken.

My Chevy Cruze was under $20k and it cost me less to operate than an EV.
 
5 days ago  

Al Tsheimers: using a good, vs. a cheap oil filter.


100% agreed. I worked doing oil changes in college and I spent time cutting apart a number of oil filters. Some are good and some are terrible.

My car uses a cartridge so it's easy to take a look at what I'm buying. I can get good quality Mobil 1 filters for under $10 when I price match using the Wal-Mart app at my local store. The cheapest Fram filters are ones I would avoid, but their next two price tiers are fine.
 
5 days ago  
I've been told there's a loose nut behind my steering wheel.
 
5 days ago  
One myth that seems to be quite strong even today is the 3,000-mile oil change.

I like to watch various mechanics on youtube and they tend to say that premature engine failure is often from not changing the oil often enough.

Car makers don't care if your car doesn't make it to 150k miles; they only care if your car makes it past your car's warranty. So they'll suggest the minimum amount of maintenance to accomplish that.
 
5 days ago  
My favorite car to not worry about oil changes was my Mazda RX-7. That car consumed a quart of oil every 250 miles. It was to where I never once changed the oil in about 100,000 miles and I just changed the filter every 3,000 miles.
 
5 days ago  

Al Tsheimers: Russ1642: Nitrogen in your tires ranks up there as the dumbest.

"air" is 78% nitrogen, correct? I know there are benefits to removing oxygen from stored cans of finishing materials by blowing in nitrogen from an aerosol can, but I have never seen an explanation for why anyone needs to do that for tires.


Pretty sure it came from racing where they have tanks of compressed nitrogen rather than air compressors.  Cheap, readily available, as good as air but drier.  Well, if it's good enough for the race track, it's good enough for YOUR car!  Says Big Nitrogen.
 
5 days ago  

flondrix: A myth I would like to see confirmed or denied from an authoritative source:  That using the 3, 2, or 1 on your automatic transmission for a long descent is somehow "not the same" as downshifting in a manual transmission car under the same circumstances, and you should just ride the brake instead.


It's denied.

Downshifting means you are using the friction inside the engine to slow your car on a descending grade. Whether it's an automatic or a manual transmission, you are using engine braking instead of friction brakes. The automatic transmission has the torque converter creating heat through fluid friction inside the transmission, but that heat is dissipated through the cooling of the fluid. That's maybe a fluid-to-air cooler on an expensive car, while most regular cars have a fluid-to-fluid cooler where the heat from the transmission is dumped into engine coolant. The cheapest cars don't have any cooling other than air flowing past the metal case and bottom fluid pan of the transmission, but I couldn't say that I've seen any modern car that does not have at least a cooling circuit where transmission fluid is passed through the engine coolant to dump the heat out through the engine coolant radiator.
 
5 days ago  

Al Tsheimers: Russ1642: Nitrogen in your tires ranks up there as the dumbest.

"air" is 78% nitrogen, correct? I know there are benefits to removing oxygen from stored cans of finishing materials by blowing in nitrogen from an aerosol can, but I have never seen an explanation for why anyone needs to do that for tires.


Probably for the same reason: so that oxygen doesn't degrade the rubber from the inside out.

That's likely the thinking of folks who do it, but they forget the oxygen isn't replenished on the inside. Stuff on the outside oxidizes because there's a steady supply of oxygen.

Using a noble gas like argon *might* make more sense, as it won't react with the tires. However, keeping a tank of argon in the garage to top off the pressure in the tires seems pretty dumb.
 
5 days ago  

flondrix: A myth I would like to see confirmed or denied from an authoritative source:  That using the 3, 2, or 1 on your automatic transmission for a long descent is somehow "not the same" as downshifting in a manual transmission car under the same circumstances, and you should just ride the brake instead.


I'm pretty sure they're referring to the torque converter in an automatic transmission. Since it's a fluid coupling, it's not as direct a connection as the clutch in a manual transmission would be, so it's not quite as effective for engine braking. It doesn't give you zero engine braking, just somewhat less than in a manual (you can often feel the difference when you let off the gas in an automatic vs the reaction from a manual).

I think however that since lockup torque converters became more common the difference might not be as stark as it once was, not to mention dual clutch automatics which would probably be about the same as a manual (being essentially an automated manual transmission, mechanically speaking).

I'm of the opinion that when going downhill from the mountains it's better to use engine braking as much as you can (within reason, don't redline it) so that you save the brakes for when you need them. I've been on that same stretch of road you referenced many many times, and I have no intention of becoming one of the people I've seen stopped on the shoulder nursing a set of smoking brake pads.
 
5 days ago  

flondrix: I noticed that the heat eventually went away.  The engine had no waste heat to give.  I had always assumed that when you used the engine to slow down the car on a long descent, all that gravitational potential energy ended up as waste heat in the engine and the engine cooling system dealt with it.


The cooling system did deal with it - it put so much of the waste heat from the engine into the air that the coolant circulating through the engine was cooled off closer to ambient temperature.

For an engine to generate waste heat it has to be combusting fuel. Modern engines will entirely cut off fueling when coasting and being used for engine braking because the engine is already rotating faster than idle speed and it doesn't need any fuel injected to turn the engine over. The end result is that the engine is turning, pumping coolant through the engine and the radiator, and that excess heat is being vented out the radiator to cool the engine. Eventually the thermostat in the engine might close because the coolant is cold enough, but the engine constantly turning is still pumping ambient temperature air through the cylinders and out the exhaust. This means the engine itself is eventually cooled below running temperature by the air being pumped through it without any fuel being injected and combusted.

There is some friction in the engine that generates heat, but the air cooling of the engine more than compensates for that over a long period of coasting.
 
5 days ago  

flondrix: There are those (including my dad) who say "I would rather buy new brake pads than a new engine/transmission"


What does your dad think will happen to the car if you use the engine for braking on a downhill grade? Ask him for exact answers and get ready to be surprised at some nonsense.
 
5 days ago  

Al Tsheimers: Russ1642: Nitrogen in your tires ranks up there as the dumbest.

"air" is 78% nitrogen, correct? I know there are benefits to removing oxygen from stored cans of finishing materials by blowing in nitrogen from an aerosol can, but I have never seen an explanation for why anyone needs to do that for tires.


Nitrogen tire inflation started in aircraft and then auto racing.

Pure nitrogen can be dehumidified to where there is no water vapor inflating the tires. This means pressure increase from heat can be very stable and controlled. It's purely to have exact, correct, predictable tire pressure for auto racing.

Sellers claim that the nitrogen molecules are bigger than O2 so they'll keep the tires inflated longer. N2 molecules are actually smaller than O2, so that sales pitch is nonsense.
 
5 days ago  

mrmopar5287: My favorite car to not worry about oil changes was my Mazda RX-7. That car consumed a quart of oil every 250 miles. It was to where I never once changed the oil in about 100,000 miles and I just changed the filter every 3,000 miles.


How does one change the filter (I presume, the oil filter) without first removing the oil first?
 
5 days ago  
Everybody knows you don't need to change blinker fluid. All professional automotive service facilities will top that off for you when you go in for your annual muffler bearing recalibration.
 
5 days ago  

dericwater: How does one change the filter (I presume, the oil filter) without first removing the oil first?


The oil filter was top-mounted. You could open the hood and grab it right there with your hands.
 
5 days ago  

LurkerSupreme: flondrix: A myth I would like to see confirmed or denied from an authoritative source:  That using the 3, 2, or 1 on your automatic transmission for a long descent is somehow "not the same" as downshifting in a manual transmission car under the same circumstances, and you should just ride the brake instead.

I'm pretty sure they're referring to the torque converter in an automatic transmission. Since it's a fluid coupling, it's not as direct a connection as the clutch in a manual transmission would be, so it's not quite as effective for engine braking. It doesn't give you zero engine braking, just somewhat less than in a manual (you can often feel the difference when you let off the gas in an automatic vs the reaction from a manual).


The clutch in a manual car had damned well better not be converting kinetic energy into heat for any sustained stretch of time--you use it briefly when starting the car, or between gears, but once you get the car into a lowish gear for a long downhill coast and take your foot off of the clutch pedal, the clutch should be out of the picture until it's time to change gears again.  The only thing worse than riding the brake is riding the clutch.

Now, with an automatic transmission, I have no idea what the fairies in the magic box are doing.  For all I know, the automatic transmission might do the equivalent of "riding the clutch" on a long descent when you are in a lower gear than the automatic transmission thinks you should be in, lending some credence to the claim that using the numbered settings on an automatic transmission is "not the same" as downshifting a manual transmission.  If, on the other hand, the automatic transmission gets into a given gear, fully engages the engine with the wheels, and disengages all clutchy things until the next time a downshift is needed (by selecting a number, you have prevented upshifting), then I would hope you are using the engine, not the torque converter, to slow the car down as you descend from the top of Mount Evans to Idaho Springs.

If there is any advantage whatsoever to a manual transmission over an automatic one, why can't someone in this era of computerized wonders design a car with a manual-type transmission and actuators controlled by a computer to do the shifting?
 
5 days ago  

falkone32: You don't need that much power. 99% of the time I'm using less than 80hp and I can only open it up on the highway for a few seconds before I'm going fast enough to lose my license.

Car batteries are usually meant for starting, not for running electronics with the engine off. There's a reason RVs and some boats use (or should use) separate deep cycle and starter batteries. My last battery went for ten years before it started to struggle in the winter.

Tires are probably the most important component in your car. It's literally the only thing connecting it to the road so don't cheap out. Tires themselves start to degrade over the course of a few (4-5 but varies based on many factors) years and, in such a case, can suddenly lose grip even if your tread is fine (see Paul Walker).

If you don't know what you are doing, don't do service work yourself. I've heard countless stories of "I replaced X and it didn't fix it, so I replaced Y" (and so on) . They often end up spending more than they would at the "stealership" and justify it with "Paying someone else to replace all these things would have cost so much more so I saved money". I need repairs maybe once every decade because I leave maintenance to the people who do it every day for a living. Works out to maybe $100 a year even with the dealership premium.

Similarly, get important things fixed when you can. Worn or broken parts tend to put a strain on other parts and neglecting something you need to pay for eventually will often end up costing more in the future. "Don't cheap out" is a recurring theme and extremely important when you're piloting a 1.5 ton hunk of metal at 60mph.

Finally, getting a new car isn't necessarily a waste of money. People say "Oh it loses X% of its value the moment you drive it off the lot" yet I've never seen that mythical car for sale. You only lose that X% immediately if you decide to sell it immediately. Most late-model used cars have premium features that make it more expensive than a new one if you don't need those features and statistics are skewed by high-depreciation cars (I can buy a ten year old BMW for slightly less than a five year old Subaru? A dirt-cheap Dodge Dart/Caliber/etc? What a value! ). Depreciation exists for a reason and you have to ask yourself "Where did that value go?"


Most of these are pretty spot on, but you're full of it on the 80hp number unless you ride a motorcycle or drive a go-cart. My last MR2 came stock with 130 naturally aspirated HP and while it COULD theoretically make it to 90MPH, it was an unlikely scenario, and getting to "lose your license" speeds was completely impossible unless you're in Virginia.

Sure, you could certainly be perfectly safe with 80HP, but it's not like everything above that is immediately reckless and thoroughly unnecessary.
 
5 days ago  

mrmopar5287: flondrix: I noticed that the heat eventually went away.  The engine had no waste heat to give.  I had always assumed that when you used the engine to slow down the car on a long descent, all that gravitational potential energy ended up as waste heat in the engine and the engine cooling system dealt with it.

The cooling system did deal with it - it put so much of the waste heat from the engine into the air that the coolant circulating through the engine was cooled off closer to ambient temperature.

For an engine to generate waste heat it has to be combusting fuel. Modern engines will entirely cut off fueling when coasting and being used for engine braking because the engine is already rotating faster than idle speed and it doesn't need any fuel injected to turn the engine over. The end result is that the engine is turning, pumping coolant through the engine and the radiator, and that excess heat is being vented out the radiator to cool the engine. Eventually the thermostat in the engine might close because the coolant is cold enough, but the engine constantly turning is still pumping ambient temperature air through the cylinders and out the exhaust. This means the engine itself is eventually cooled below running temperature by the air being pumped through it without any fuel being injected and combusted.

There is some friction in the engine that generates heat, but the air cooling of the engine more than compensates for that over a long period of coasting.


You'll also "squeeze" the heat out of the ambient air while in the cylinder, which should make it colder in the exhaust end. Some of the potential energy being used up is turning your engine in a wasteful air compressor.
 
5 days ago  
You buy a car and drive it off the lot. Where does half of the car's value go?

People seem surprised and puzzled by this. They feel it is unfair or irrational, or something.

Well, there are all kinds of explanations.

The first is that the car is not NEW anymore. It is USED. And no matter what else there is about the car, people are willing to pay more for NEW cars. Rational or irrational, that is no surprise. Reputation. Signalling. Bragging rights. Chick magnet. New car smell. Whatever.

Second is that a NEW car can have options and choices and colors and all kinds of idiosyncratic characteristics for a particular purchaser that WILL NOT be the same for the person who buys it used. Even a car that is perfectly suited to the used car buyer will not be suitable for everyone else in the market. Therefore, the price will be lower.

Third is that the legal framework of lemon laws, warrantees, cooling off periods, financing scam protection, etc. might not apply to a second owner.

Fourth is that one would assume that a dealer is not going to abuse or ruin the car before they sell it, but some RANDO owner can do whatever they want to the car within an hour of taking possession of it. So there is risk and uncertainty in buying such a vehicle, and a muddled chain of custody.

Fifth is clipping of a subsidy. If the purchase of a new car is subsidized, the second owner will not get that subsidy.

Sixth is that NEW cars are simply overpriced so that a dealer can make a profit. This is obvious, one would think.

Seventh is that NEW cars are novel, with new technologies and features that are not available in other cars, presumably. In a year or two, every comparable car might have that feature, making it less special.

Well. That is enough. I think I could go on. The depreciation dip is justified. It is not reasonable to think that straight line depreciation is the way that a market will value a car.

People can and do make money looking for bargains among slightly owned vehicles. Some people say the best bargains are in buying "young" cars with low mileage. Others say the best deals are in young cars with high mileage. Older cars, whether they have low or high mileage have their proponents and opponents.

What is REALLY REALLY clear is that the dip in value has little to do with the function of the car. Even cars with very high quality will show a hefty dip, but provide valuable transportation service for decades.
 
5 days ago  

Albinoman: You'll also "squeeze" the heat out of the ambient air while in the cylinder, which should make it colder in the exhaust end.


Nope. Almost 100% of the energy compressed is gained back when it's expanded again. Aside from that, you'd be compressing the air to raise the temperature and, if the engine were cooler than ambient, some of that heat would be absorbed by the engine. But in this case the engine is already above ambient temperature, so that means the heat from the engine is being transferred into the air in the cylinders that gets pumped out the exhaust. The exhaust is coming out warmer than when it entered without any combustion occurring because the waste heat accumulated by the engine is being vented into the air being pumped through the engine.
 
5 days ago  

SumoJeb: Most oil manufacturers give their oil a life of around 6 months before it doesn't protect as well.
I go based on the oil manufacturer's guidelines since they made the shiat.


That argument would also justify printers refusing to print black when a colour runs out. Or having a predefined page count that they will print and will not print once they hit it.

Someone selling a consumable will do what they can to ensure you use more consumable.
 
5 days ago  

flondrix: If there is any advantage whatsoever to a manual transmission over an automatic one, why can't someone in this era of computerized wonders design a car with a manual-type transmission and actuators controlled by a computer to do the shifting?


It's been done.

There have been more than a few automated manual transmissions - one of the lesser-known varieties is on the Toyota MR2. Ferrari and Lamborghini also did that.

In modern times, all the DSG transmissions (VW, Porsche, Hyundai, etc.) are automated manuals. They are manual transmissions with two clutches controlling two shafts with different gears on each shaft (typically odds and evens). One gear is running and when it's time to change gears the next higher gear is "pre-selected." Almost instantaneously, one clutch is engaged with the next gear is disengaged. The shifts happen faster than a human can accomplish.
 
5 days ago  

Lusiphur: you're full of it on the 80hp number


VW made and sold a huge number of Jettas, Golfs, and Passats with 90 horsepower TDI engines. They accomplished safe and spirited driving very easily, and lots of them continue to do so to this day.
 
5 days ago  

Lusiphur: Most of these are pretty spot on, but you're full of it on the 80hp number unless you ride a motorcycle or drive a go-cart. My last MR2 came stock with 130 naturally aspirated HP and while it COULD theoretically make it to 90MPH, it was an unlikely scenario, and getting to "lose your license" speeds was completely impossible unless you're in Virginia.

Sure, you could certainly be perfectly safe with 80HP, but it's not like everything above that is immediately reckless and thoroughly unnecessary.


The idea behind the hybrid automobile is to have a smaller ICE engine closer to the average power consumption of the vehicle, and a battery and motor to give you the boost you need for accelerating, passing, and of course the kick-ass torque at low speeds that electric motors are so good at.

When you look at the efficiency of a gasoline engine in terms of gasoline consumed per amount of mechanical work done, the "sweet spot" is toward the high end.  Not redlined, but at a higher power than most ordinary automobile engines run at most of the time.  If you only need 80HP most of the time according to the person you are responding to, better to build an engine that delivers 80HP with great fuel efficiency, and have it charge up a battery for the times when you need more.  I don't know how diesel engines behave exactly, but diesel locomotives were hybrids long before hybrids were cool.

I would take the idea even further--tweak and optimize an engine that operates only in its ideal power band, only at one ideal torque and speed, turning an ideal load (a generator).  All it does is charge the battery.  When the battery is full, the engine shuts off.  Electric motors take care of turning the wheels and everything else.  Basically, an electric car with a built-in range extender.
 
5 days ago  

falkone32: Car batteries are usually meant for starting, not for running electronics with the engine off. There's a reason RVs and some boats use (or should use) separate deep cycle and starter batteries. My last battery went for ten years before it started to struggle in the winter.


A lot of Mercedes now have an accessory battery.

...

...

The car refuses to start if it fails. And oddly, the failure rate is very high.

I think they started putting them in around the mid-2000s on the SLKs at first.
 
5 days ago  

flondrix: If there is any advantage whatsoever to a manual transmission over an automatic one, why can't someone in this era of computerized wonders design a car with a manual-type transmission and actuators controlled by a computer to do the shifting?


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automat​e​d_manual_transmission
 
5 days ago  

flondrix: I would take the idea even further--tweak and optimize an engine that operates only in its ideal power band, only at one ideal torque and speed, turning an ideal load (a generator).  All it does is charge the battery.  When the battery is full, the engine shuts off.  Electric motors take care of turning the wheels and everything else.  Basically, an electric car with a built-in range extender.


It would be more efficient to have the engine operating in an efficient range by using an efficient transmission to directly drive the wheels. Even the Chevy Volt had the engine directly coupled to the wheels at higher speeds because that was most efficient.
 
5 days ago  

mrmopar5287: In modern times, all the DSG transmissions (VW, Porsche, Hyundai, etc.) are automated manuals. They are manual transmissions with two clutches controlling two shafts with different gears on each shaft (typically odds and evens). One gear is running and when it's time to change gears the next higher gear is "pre-selected." Almost instantaneously, one clutch is engaged with the next gear is disengaged. The shifts happen faster than a human can accomplish.


So, "manual transmissons are more efficient than automatics" is a myth, so long as you have a spiffy state-of-the-art automatic?
 
Displayed 50 of 80 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.