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(Food and Wine)   Tip your server(s) well you cheap bastards   (foodandwine.com) divider line
    More: PSA, Minimum wage, Employment, Wage, lieu of wages, recent study, minimum wage, house workers, big idea  
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570 clicks; posted to Food » on 14 Sep 2021 at 9:38 AM (12 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



22 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-09-14 9:16:24 AM  
No. PAY the servers a living wage, YOU CHEAP BASTARDS.
 
2021-09-14 9:27:15 AM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: No. PAY the servers a living wage, YOU CHEAP BASTARDS.


But then a burrito will cost an extra $0.19 and at that point you're just historys greatest monster
 
2021-09-14 9:48:52 AM  
tip your driver. gas costs money
 
2021-09-14 9:50:57 AM  
I left a $5 tip for popcorn and a glass of water at Alamo the other day.  Server stopped in mid-stride when noticed and gave me a thank you salute.  They notice and remember.

We would get treated like royalty at a fancy Italian restaurant we used to go to.  Came in one night for dinner and they having a special event dinner we didn't know about.  The manager was shocked and told us they had a no-show couple, and we could have their seats.  That was a $120 freebie.
 
2021-09-14 10:01:57 AM  
I'd be ok with restaurants just adding 20% on the cost of food and paying their servers a normal wage. If the server does a great job then I might tip a little extra on top.
 
2021-09-14 10:07:59 AM  
What about grubhub/seamless delivery? I'm not tipping 20% because it's not going back to the restaurant staff.
 
2021-09-14 10:17:07 AM  

exparrot: What about grubhub/seamless delivery? I'm not tipping 20% because it's not going back to the restaurant staff.


I quit using them since those drivers are not getting a living wage, either.

Mr.Poops: I'd be ok with restaurants just adding 20% on the cost of food and paying their servers a normal wage. If the server does a great job then I might tip a little extra on top.


You'd be in restaurants with fewer customers. The answer was given in the Boobies. Pay better wages. If that means the poor CEO or owner gets less, then so be it.
 
2021-09-14 10:30:24 AM  

exparrot: What about grubhub/seamless delivery? I'm not tipping 20% because it's not going back to the restaurant staff.


Because with Grubhub, doordash etc., as mentioned above, gas costs money. It doesn't cost money for the restaurant staff to make your food, they're being paid to do so even if you don't think it's enough, but it's costs me money to deliver it.

And just like the in restaurant experience, if you want better faster service, tip better. We can see the tip when the order comes through. I'm not driving 4 miles to deliver your McDonalds for a 50 cent tip. Go farking get it yourself.

And this is partially the reason why when people complain that these services take so long. I get your order because I'm the closest available driver. If I see a payout that doesn't align with the distance, I turn it down. Now you have wait until another driver willing to take it and that may take some time. Someone eventually will.
 
2021-09-14 10:33:03 AM  
Tipping is not a city in China.
 
2021-09-14 10:47:17 AM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: No. PAY the servers a living wage, YOU CHEAP BASTARDS.


But, if they did that, we'd no longer be able to humble-brag about our overly generous tipping habits!
 
2021-09-14 11:03:11 AM  

Mr.Poops: I'd be ok with restaurants just adding 20% on the cost of food and paying their servers a normal wage. If the server does a great job then I might tip a little extra on top.


This is OK if, and only if, 100% of that 20% charge goes to the staff. These places that have been throwing a percentage fee on top lately then saying it isn't a tip can fark right off.

Also fark places that add a mandatory service charge for larger groups. Either do that shiat for all parties, or don't.
 
2021-09-14 11:04:38 AM  

abhorrent1: exparrot: What about grubhub/seamless delivery? I'm not tipping 20% because it's not going back to the restaurant staff.

Because with Grubhub, doordash etc., as mentioned above, gas costs money. It doesn't cost money for the restaurant staff to make your food, they're being paid to do so even if you don't think it's enough, but it's costs me money to deliver it.

And just like the in restaurant experience, if you want better faster service, tip better. We can see the tip when the order comes through. I'm not driving 4 miles to deliver your McDonalds for a 50 cent tip. Go farking get it yourself.

And this is partially the reason why when people complain that these services take so long. I get your order because I'm the closest available driver. If I see a payout that doesn't align with the distance, I turn it down. Now you have wait until another driver willing to take it and that may take some time. Someone eventually will.


Wait staff doesn't get to decide what kind of service to provide by knowing their tip prior to serving. Why should you? I've tipped Uber drivers but that comes after your ride. I've also had experiences like a left on red because it was at night and there was no traffic, and I didn't tip. If Uber Eats works that way, tip after service, I would rather bring my business to them. I've never used Uber eats so I don't know. Your employer's billing shouldn't put you in the cat bird seat.
 
2021-09-14 11:11:58 AM  
It's only the 14th. I can't believe we are getting this month's tipping thread out of the way this early.
 
2021-09-14 11:44:02 AM  

Yellow Beard: It's only the 14th. I can't believe we are getting this month's tipping thread out of the way this early.


It's to make room for a second one this month.

fasahd: abhorrent1: exparrot: What about grubhub/seamless delivery? I'm not tipping 20% because it's not going back to the restaurant staff.

Because with Grubhub, doordash etc., as mentioned above, gas costs money. It doesn't cost money for the restaurant staff to make your food, they're being paid to do so even if you don't think it's enough, but it's costs me money to deliver it.

And just like the in restaurant experience, if you want better faster service, tip better. We can see the tip when the order comes through. I'm not driving 4 miles to deliver your McDonalds for a 50 cent tip. Go farking get it yourself.

And this is partially the reason why when people complain that these services take so long. I get your order because I'm the closest available driver. If I see a payout that doesn't align with the distance, I turn it down. Now you have wait until another driver willing to take it and that may take some time. Someone eventually will.

Wait staff doesn't get to decide what kind of service to provide by knowing their tip prior to serving. Why should you? I've tipped Uber drivers but that comes after your ride. I've also had experiences like a left on red because it was at night and there was no traffic, and I didn't tip. If Uber Eats works that way, tip after service, I would rather bring my business to them. I've never used Uber eats so I don't know. Your employer's billing shouldn't put you in the cat bird seat.


I dunno about that one. I'd actually be pretty alright with a driver who got me to my destination faster by doing this safely. Waiting for the magnetic sensor to give you your turn when there's literally no other traffic on the road is technically following the law, but at the same time feels completely disconnected from the spirit of that law.
 
2021-09-14 11:47:23 AM  

abhorrent1: exparrot: What about grubhub/seamless delivery? I'm not tipping 20% because it's not going back to the restaurant staff.

Because with Grubhub, doordash etc., as mentioned above, gas costs money. It doesn't cost money for the restaurant staff to make your food, they're being paid to do so even if you don't think it's enough, but it's costs me money to deliver it.

And just like the in restaurant experience, if you want better faster service, tip better. We can see the tip when the order comes through. I'm not driving 4 miles to deliver your McDonalds for a 50 cent tip. Go farking get it yourself.

And this is partially the reason why when people complain that these services take so long. I get your order because I'm the closest available driver. If I see a payout that doesn't align with the distance, I turn it down. Now you have wait until another driver willing to take it and that may take some time. Someone eventually will.


If the restaurant is within 2 miles of my house, I'm tipping $5-6 on a bag of food. Might be sandwiches or it might be sushi that cost 10x more, who cares. he is bringing me a bag, and I am giving him $5. That seems appropriate.
I'm not trying to be Mr. Pink here. If I should reassess, I'm open to it.
 
2021-09-14 12:04:49 PM  

fasahd: abhorrent1: exparrot: What about grubhub/seamless delivery? I'm not tipping 20% because it's not going back to the restaurant staff.

Because with Grubhub, doordash etc., as mentioned above, gas costs money. It doesn't cost money for the restaurant staff to make your food, they're being paid to do so even if you don't think it's enough, but it's costs me money to deliver it.

And just like the in restaurant experience, if you want better faster service, tip better. We can see the tip when the order comes through. I'm not driving 4 miles to deliver your McDonalds for a 50 cent tip. Go farking get it yourself.

And this is partially the reason why when people complain that these services take so long. I get your order because I'm the closest available driver. If I see a payout that doesn't align with the distance, I turn it down. Now you have wait until another driver willing to take it and that may take some time. Someone eventually will.

Wait staff doesn't get to decide what kind of service to provide by knowing their tip prior to serving. Why should you? I've tipped Uber drivers but that comes after your ride. I've also had experiences like a left on red because it was at night and there was no traffic, and I didn't tip. If Uber Eats works that way, tip after service, I would rather bring my business to them. I've never used Uber eats so I don't know. Your employer's billing shouldn't put you in the cat bird seat.


The tip is adjustable up to an hour after delivery. If I couldn't see the "expected" tip, I don't know that I'd do it.

Here's what I see. This is one I didn't take.

Fark user imageView Full Size


You think I'm gonna drive 8 miles and waste an hour of my time for a $1.00 tip? Yeah, no. In the amount of time it takes me to do this one order, I can do three closer orders.

the rest is tip so I know this order had 4-5 dollar tip.  If the price said $2.60, which I see a lot, I know there's no tip or a very small, like 60 cent tip. I'm not taking that simply on the chance that you'll log back in later and add a tip. People probably won't. Not because they're jerks or whatever but just because they're busy and forget or something.

I'm not worried about the cat bird seat. You can't who turned down your order. It just goes to someone else.
 
2021-09-14 12:10:30 PM  
olrasputin:
Wait staff doesn't get to decide what kind of service to provide by knowing their tip prior to serving. Why should you? I've tipped Uber drivers but that comes after your ride. I've also had experiences like a left on red because it was at night and there was no traffic, and I didn't tip. If Uber Eats works that way, tip after service, I would rather bring my business to them. I've never used Uber eats so I don't know. Your employer's billing shouldn't put you in the cat bird seat.

I dunno about that one. I'd actually be pretty alright with a driver who got me to my destination faster by doing this safely. Waiting for the magnetic sensor to give you your turn when there's literally no other traffic on the road is technically following the law, but at the same time feels completely disconnected from the spirit of that law.


We could split hairs. It was about 9pm, winter, oncoming headlights were a reasonable distance away to make the turn; not total cricket time. Still a visible act that could have gotten him pulled over on my dime. Sorry we got so off topic.
 
2021-09-14 12:11:11 PM  

exparrot: abhorrent1: exparrot: What about grubhub/seamless delivery? I'm not tipping 20% because it's not going back to the restaurant staff.

Because with Grubhub, doordash etc., as mentioned above, gas costs money. It doesn't cost money for the restaurant staff to make your food, they're being paid to do so even if you don't think it's enough, but it's costs me money to deliver it.

And just like the in restaurant experience, if you want better faster service, tip better. We can see the tip when the order comes through. I'm not driving 4 miles to deliver your McDonalds for a 50 cent tip. Go farking get it yourself.

And this is partially the reason why when people complain that these services take so long. I get your order because I'm the closest available driver. If I see a payout that doesn't align with the distance, I turn it down. Now you have wait until another driver willing to take it and that may take some time. Someone eventually will.

If the restaurant is within 2 miles of my house, I'm tipping $5-6 on a bag of food. Might be sandwiches or it might be sushi that cost 10x more, who cares. he is bringing me a bag, and I am giving him $5. That seems appropriate.
I'm not trying to be Mr. Pink here. If I should reassess, I'm open to it.


5-6 bucks for 2 miles is good IMO, but I don't think most people consider the distance when they tip. They may not even know. I'm not saying it's malicious or they're being Mr. Pink but it's something they should consider.
 
2021-09-14 12:22:06 PM  

fasahd: olrasputin:
Wait staff doesn't get to decide what kind of service to provide by knowing their tip prior to serving. Why should you? I've tipped Uber drivers but that comes after your ride. I've also had experiences like a left on red because it was at night and there was no traffic, and I didn't tip. If Uber Eats works that way, tip after service, I would rather bring my business to them. I've never used Uber eats so I don't know. Your employer's billing shouldn't put you in the cat bird seat.

I dunno about that one. I'd actually be pretty alright with a driver who got me to my destination faster by doing this safely. Waiting for the magnetic sensor to give you your turn when there's literally no other traffic on the road is technically following the law, but at the same time feels completely disconnected from the spirit of that law.

We could split hairs. It was about 9pm, winter, oncoming headlights were a reasonable distance away to make the turn; not total cricket time. Still a visible act that could have gotten him pulled over on my dime. Sorry we got so off topic.


Yeah, that's a lot more dubious. I was imagining more "midnight at a completely dead residential or light commercial cross street".


As for the actual topic, we briefly shelled out reasonable tips for food delivery in April/May 2020. But ever since we got vaccinated, one of us just drives to get takeout.

Money aside, we mostly stopped using food delivery services because they fark over both their "employees" and the local restaurants we're trying to support.
 
2021-09-14 12:30:12 PM  
I dine alone frequently and there's a point where if I eat cheap enough, the normal percentage based tip just didn't seem adequate so I've instituted a minimum $ amount tip.

There is a pizza place near where I worked back before I went 100% remote.  Food and service was always great but I could get out of there for like $7 (it's been a decade, prices have gone up, I'm sure).  I always took it up to $10.   But I was a regular and the staff knew me.  One day I was there when it had been a particularly challenging day at work and I was pretty burned out.  The server, Mindy, could tell I wasn't my normal self.  That day the restaurant just fed me for free.  I still tipped.

/I had also gotten to know the owner a bit.  Great guy.
//Basically he created a restaurant with a mind to have it as a place he'd hang out at if he wasn't running it.
///And he did, he'd just hang out there on days he wasn't actively working.
 
2021-09-14 5:07:46 PM  
The real solution, of course, is to get rid of the Tipped Wage category. That was carved out of the Mimimum Wage laws because Southerners wanted their Domestics to be as close to slaves as possible. In the meantime a lot depends. We don't use delivery services largely because the staff who prepare and package up the food get no tips, and that's on top of the rat-farking the delivery services inflict on the restaurant. OTOH a tip should have something to do with service. Handing me a bag does not represent the same amount of time and trouble as dealing with a table full of sit-down diners. So no, no matter how much people in the last tipping thread screeched and ooked "Enjoy your cold beans and rice at home!" the person who hands me a plastic bag at the counter has not done a task worth a 30% surcharge.
 
2021-09-15 8:27:46 AM  
"On top of their hourly pay, O'Connor uses a practice known as "tip pooling." This means that every dollar of the tip is put into one pot of money and distributed between staff based on hours worked. "

I knew someone who worked in a place with something like that, but with an extra flourish.

The tip money was distributed as gift cards for the restaurant itself, and could only be spent there.
 
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