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(MSN)   From zippers to glass, to yes, liquor bottles AND BOURBON, shortages of basic goods are getting serious   (msn.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Federal Reserve System, Factory, Brown-Forman Corporation, local producers, CEO of Cane Creek Cycling Components, Woodford Reserve, tent factory, Supply and demand  
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721 clicks; posted to Business » on 13 Sep 2021 at 8:35 AM (6 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



50 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
6 days ago  
We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

Also durability enforcement, penalization of planned obsolescence and discardable goods.

The only way to do this in our system is a combination of taxes and penalties to convince overseas manufacturing to come back home, carrots for good boys and girls who do onshore, and guillotines for the rest.
 
6 days ago  
Thanks, O'Biden.
 
6 days ago  

yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.


tse3.mm.bing.netView Full Size


Yeah... I'm sure Apollo Group, Cerberus, Bain, and the rest will get RIGHT on that. Face it, we're f*cked. Giving them tax incentives to move sh*t offshore was probably the dumbest possible thing we've ever done. And we've done some really stupid sh*t.

We're not going to convince them to move it back here, not with the disparity in labor costs. They'll just move their tax center or HQ off shore, the ones that haven't already, and fart in our general direction.
 
6 days ago  

yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.


I was going to come in and say something about JIT and you beat me to it.  It's something I've been concerned about for a while.  All it takes is one wrench in the works and the whole house of cards comes crashing down.

What surprised me is that we didn't see more of it happening last year when the global shutdown was in effect.
 
6 days ago  

yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

Also durability enforcement, penalization of planned obsolescence and discardable goods.

The only way to do this in our system is a combination of taxes and penalties to convince overseas manufacturing to come back home, carrots for good boys and girls who do onshore, and guillotines for the rest.


Do you want to pay more for your Toyota?  Because this is how you'll pay more for your Toyota!
 
6 days ago  
The current trend towards hoarding and price gouging isn't helping these things.
 
6 days ago  

The Googles Do Nothing: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

Also durability enforcement, penalization of planned obsolescence and discardable goods.

The only way to do this in our system is a combination of taxes and penalties to convince overseas manufacturing to come back home, carrots for good boys and girls who do onshore, and guillotines for the rest.

Do you want to pay more for your Toyota?  Because this is how you'll pay more for your Toyota!


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
6 days ago  

The Googles Do Nothing: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

Also durability enforcement, penalization of planned obsolescence and discardable goods.

The only way to do this in our system is a combination of taxes and penalties to convince overseas manufacturing to come back home, carrots for good boys and girls who do onshore, and guillotines for the rest.

Do you want to pay more for your Toyota?  Because this is how you'll pay more for your Toyota!


Well, considering most Toyotas are made here in the US. It's also a Japanese company so all the profits, outside of wages paid domestically, go back to Japan.

I think VW, Toyota, Mercedes make more vehicles in the US than the Big Three do. I could be wrong about that, but I vaguely remember an article about that.
 
6 days ago  

BizarreMan: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

I was going to come in and say something about JIT and you beat me to it.  It's something I've been concerned about for a while.  All it takes is one wrench in the works and the whole house of cards comes crashing down.

What surprised me is that we didn't see more of it happening last year when the global shutdown was in effect.


But, but, but, there are procedures in place to ensure that nothing can go wrong.  Consultant companies who have no idea what we do told us how to do it and wrote up SOP's to follow.  Nothing can possibly go wrong if we follow the procedures.  We paid them millions.  These new people are so much better than the last consultants we paid millions to, their way was wrong, the new people said so.  Plus, my brother in law works for them.
 
6 days ago  

NewportBarGuy: The Googles Do Nothing: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

Also durability enforcement, penalization of planned obsolescence and discardable goods.

The only way to do this in our system is a combination of taxes and penalties to convince overseas manufacturing to come back home, carrots for good boys and girls who do onshore, and guillotines for the rest.

Do you want to pay more for your Toyota?  Because this is how you'll pay more for your Toyota!

Well, considering most Toyotas are made here in the US. It's also a Japanese company so all the profits, outside of wages paid domestically, go back to Japan.

I think VW, Toyota, Mercedes make more vehicles in the US than the Big Three do. I could be wrong about that, but I vaguely remember an article about that.


It could be any manufacturing company, I just used Toyota because they perfected JIT and were the subject of many Harvard Business Review case studies.
 
6 days ago  

The Googles Do Nothing: NewportBarGuy: The Googles Do Nothing: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

Also durability enforcement, penalization of planned obsolescence and discardable goods.

The only way to do this in our system is a combination of taxes and penalties to convince overseas manufacturing to come back home, carrots for good boys and girls who do onshore, and guillotines for the rest.

Do you want to pay more for your Toyota?  Because this is how you'll pay more for your Toyota!

Well, considering most Toyotas are made here in the US. It's also a Japanese company so all the profits, outside of wages paid domestically, go back to Japan.

I think VW, Toyota, Mercedes make more vehicles in the US than the Big Three do. I could be wrong about that, but I vaguely remember an article about that.

It could be any manufacturing company, I just used Toyota because they perfected JIT and were the subject of many Harvard Business Review case studies.


Hell yeah they did!! Gung-Ho may have been a comedy, but it was a good introduction to a young me with just how goddamn efficient they can be. I assume they were copying Toyota at the time.

Showed just how piss-poor we were running our stuff and needed to learn quickly.

I mean, that K-car was just such an amazing automobile... God we built such giant sacks of sh*t. We needed them to eat our lunch just to learn how to compete.
 
6 days ago  

BizarreMan: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

I was going to come in and say something about JIT and you beat me to it.  It's something I've been concerned about for a while.  All it takes is one wrench in the works and the whole house of cards comes crashing down.

What surprised me is that we didn't see more of it happening last year when the global shutdown was in effect.


Demand for a bunch of stuff went down during the shutdown. We're noticing now because people are leaving their homes more regularly.

I'm employed at a smaller printing facility that is part of a much larger organization. The people at the top kept trying to cram JIT and low/no inventory down our throats for decades (I've been here 28 years) and one of the managers just kept quietly stock-piling the supplies that she knew we would need. Other than "heated discussion" at budget meetings it worked well.

Said manager was forced into retirement during the dramatic slow-down when Covid first hit. The team currently in charge is completely focused on kissing the asses of everyone higher-up. They've ignored basics like supply chains. All of our clients (government and education types) have been forced to return to their offices, at least part time, and our workload has exploded in the past five weeks.

The result? I've been waiting for an order of lamination material for THREE MONTHS. It exists somewhere, but nobody can get it to me. I'm also not printing on my office printer today because WE HAVE NO BLACK TONER CARTRIDGES. We are a goddamned PRINTING COMPANY and we have no toner in the supply closet.

/I need this place to stay afloat for four goddamned years so I can get old enough to get my full retirement benefits.
//It's not looking good.
///fark.
 
6 days ago  

NewportBarGuy: The Googles Do Nothing: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

Also durability enforcement, penalization of planned obsolescence and discardable goods.

The only way to do this in our system is a combination of taxes and penalties to convince overseas manufacturing to come back home, carrots for good boys and girls who do onshore, and guillotines for the rest.

Do you want to pay more for your Toyota?  Because this is how you'll pay more for your Toyota!

Well, considering most Toyotas are made here in the US. It's also a Japanese company so all the profits, outside of wages paid domestically, go back to Japan.

I think VW, Toyota, Mercedes make more vehicles in the US than the Big Three do. I could be wrong about that, but I vaguely remember an article about that.


Manufacturing even in China now is highly automated since Chinese wages are much higher than 20 years ago (for skilled labor it's at parity with the US).
And it's not just manufacturing sites, but also raw materials.  China has extended it's power to the world to gather materials to supply their manufacturing sector, and have them firmly in their control via the China development bank, roads, rail, shipping, and contracts / foreign aid to foreign officials (bribes too). We also ceded the global supply chain to China.  They build infrastructure and gain global influence with the best of the best in their communist party while we argue over wearing masks and oppressing half of the population while eating horse ivermectin paste through the barrel of an AR-15 clone.
We're basically the old fat Elvis coked out in a bedazzled jumpsuit, a caricature of our former power and status.
 
6 days ago  

yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

Also durability enforcement, penalization of planned obsolescence and discardable goods.

The only way to do this in our system is a combination of taxes and penalties to convince overseas manufacturing to come back home, carrots for good boys and girls who do onshore, and guillotines for the rest.


We've traditionally gotten most of the stuff to feed our factory from domestic suppliers... We've had to start buying certain products and chemicals from foreign vendors during this pandemic.  The problems actually started before the pandemic and it was nationwide in manufacturing and logistics.

Granted, the pandemic turned a relatively small, but growing, problem into a giant one overnight, but it's ultimately a manpower problem domestically.

Automation wiped out so many jobs in manufacturing and logistics over the last generations that it stagnated wage growth in the industries and kept younger people out.  If you're looking at hiring two candidates, one of whom is a 40 year old with 20 years of experience working at a similar factory that recently downsized and the other is a 20 year old who's been working part time at McDonald's since he graduated high school... you're going to pick the guy with 20 years of experience... now those people are hitting an age where they can no longer do manual labor.

Due to the surplus of labor in those fields over the last generations, wages have been stagnant, they're just now rising, but it's too little too late to account for not recruiting enough new workers over the last decade.  Then there's the fact that most factories are now in rural America.  This has two problems.

First, many factories moved to these small towns due to the lower prevailing wages... the successful ones have now outgrown the town and there isn't a big enough local labor pool to feed them.  The other thing is, they didn't move to the nice small towns or the farming communities.  They moved to the run down ones... and those have just been completely devastated by heroin and meth in the last 20 years.

The only quick and easy band-aid to put on this bullet wound is to open up the borders.  There are a lot of people who would be willing to work at an American factory for $20.00 an hour.  Long term, the only way to fill the factories without immigrants is to keep pay consistently high enough to recruit new workers to the fields.

/Two cents
//Low level management at a factory
///These last two years have been awful
 
6 days ago  
I read the first few paragraphs of TFA where there was some complaining because the shades of black velcro don't quite match.

Can't get much more "First World Problems" than that.  Stopped reading right there.
 
6 days ago  

Liadan: BizarreMan: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

I was going to come in and say something about JIT and you beat me to it.  It's something I've been concerned about for a while.  All it takes is one wrench in the works and the whole house of cards comes crashing down.

What surprised me is that we didn't see more of it happening last year when the global shutdown was in effect.

Demand for a bunch of stuff went down during the shutdown. We're noticing now because people are leaving their homes more regularly.

I'm employed at a smaller printing facility that is part of a much larger organization. The people at the top kept trying to cram JIT and low/no inventory down our throats for decades (I've been here 28 years) and one of the managers just kept quietly stock-piling the supplies that she knew we would need. Other than "heated discussion" at budget meetings it worked well.

Said manager was forced into retirement during the dramatic slow-down when Covid first hit. The team currently in charge is completely focused on kissing the asses of everyone higher-up. They've ignored basics like supply chains. All of our clients (government and education types) have been forced to return to their offices, at least part time, and our workload has exploded in the past five weeks.

The result? I've been waiting for an order of lamination material for THREE MONTHS. It exists somewhere, but nobody can get it to me. I'm also not printing on my office printer today because WE HAVE NO BLACK TONER CARTRIDGES. We are a goddamned PRINTING COMPANY and we have no toner in the supply closet.

/I need this place to stay afloat for four goddamned years so I can get old enough to get my full retirement benefits.
//It's not looking good.
///fark.


As a low level manager at a factory, the trick is you get approval from a mid level manager.  You catch them on a Friday afternoon and ask if it's cool if you make a bomb shelter, put a tag on it saying "Do not use, see ____" then put it up in the racks.

If anybody asks they can tell corporate that there was a quality issue with that shipment and they haven't gotten around to looking at it yet.

For smaller/cheaper stuff we're likely to run out of just scrap it out in inventory and hide it in the office.
 
6 days ago  

Slow To Return: I read the first few paragraphs of TFA where there was some complaining because the shades of black velcro don't quite match.

Can't get much more "First World Problems" than that.  Stopped reading right there.


Really? Because that statement in the article is telling. We're full bore into "We can't get you what you want but maybe we can try and substitute something" phase. Immediately after that is "We got nothing, check back in a year".

I don't know about everyone else, but there are weird holes popping up in grocery shelves here again.
 
6 days ago  

yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

Also durability enforcement, penalization of planned obsolescence and discardable goods.

The only way to do this in our system is a combination of taxes and penalties to convince overseas manufacturing to come back home, carrots for good boys and girls who do onshore, and guillotines for the rest.


Limit supply raises prices

Profit!
 
6 days ago  

NewportBarGuy: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

[tse3.mm.bing.net image 270x210]

Yeah... I'm sure Apollo Group, Cerberus, Bain, and the rest will get RIGHT on that. Face it, we're f*cked. Giving them tax incentives to move sh*t offshore was probably the dumbest possible thing we've ever done. And we've done some really stupid sh*t.

We're not going to convince them to move it back here, not with the disparity in labor costs. They'll just move their tax center or HQ off shore, the ones that haven't already, and fart in our general direction.


You're incapable of reading the last sentence.

Hence guillotines.

I'm not being facetious.
 
6 days ago  

BizarreMan: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

I was going to come in and say something about JIT and you beat me to it.  It's something I've been concerned about for a while.  All it takes is one wrench in the works and the whole house of cards comes crashing down.

What surprised me is that we didn't see more of it happening last year when the global shutdown was in effect.


If JIT rewards sit at home stock owners then JIT is wht you will GET
 
6 days ago  

Linux_Yes: BizarreMan: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

I was going to come in and say something about JIT and you beat me to it.  It's something I've been concerned about for a while.  All it takes is one wrench in the works and the whole house of cards comes crashing down.

What surprised me is that we didn't see more of it happening last year when the global shutdown was in effect.

If JIT rewards sit at home stock owners then JIT is wht you will GET


It really doesn't though.  It makes production less efficient as it's easier to set up a production line for one product and keep it on that product for as long as possible.  Changeovers create down time, wasted man hours and all sorts of maintenance issues.

It's better to have the supplies to keep making that product and the warehouse space to store it for as long as possible.  It's even better when you don't have to have low level managers deciding what product to changeover to when they realize they're out of a necessary material at midnight on a Wednesday.
 
6 days ago  
In a world not largely run by children, this would convince more than a few large corporations to spread out their production and across multiple nations to avoid issues related to any single trade route or single region's environmental/political situation. It also might make some nations' thinky bits consider subsidizing or nationalizing baseline production of some things that everyone needs

We don't live in that world or anything close, so I think we should just make shortage bingo cards for '22.
 
6 days ago  

electricjebus: Linux_Yes: BizarreMan: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

I was going to come in and say something about JIT and you beat me to it.  It's something I've been concerned about for a while.  All it takes is one wrench in the works and the whole house of cards comes crashing down.

What surprised me is that we didn't see more of it happening last year when the global shutdown was in effect.

If JIT rewards sit at home stock owners then JIT is wht you will GET

It really doesn't though.  It makes production less efficient as it's easier to set up a production line for one product and keep it on that product for as long as possible.  Changeovers create down time, wasted man hours and all sorts of maintenance issues.

It's better to have the supplies to keep making that product and the warehouse space to store it for as long as possible.  It's even better when you don't have to have low level managers deciding what product to changeover to when they realize they're out of a necessary material at midnight on a Wednesday.


So storage doesnt cost money that could be going to stock owners instead??

Why do you think JIT took off in the first place??   So i could get a fresher Asus router??
 
6 days ago  
My neighborhood Safeway looks like we were told a massive winter storm was coming tomorrow. It's cleaned out.
 
6 days ago  

FormlessOne: My neighborhood Safeway looks like we were told a massive winter storm was coming tomorrow. It's cleaned out.


Limiting supply raises prices

Profit!
 
6 days ago  

electricjebus: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

Also durability enforcement, penalization of planned obsolescence and discardable goods.

The only way to do this in our system is a combination of taxes and penalties to convince overseas manufacturing to come back home, carrots for good boys and girls who do onshore, and guillotines for the rest.

We've traditionally gotten most of the stuff to feed our factory from domestic suppliers... We've had to start buying certain products and chemicals from foreign vendors during this pandemic.  The problems actually started before the pandemic and it was nationwide in manufacturing and logistics.

Granted, the pandemic turned a relatively small, but growing, problem into a giant one overnight, but it's ultimately a manpower problem domestically.

Automation wiped out so many jobs in manufacturing and logistics over the last generations that it stagnated wage growth in the industries and kept younger people out.  If you're looking at hiring two candidates, one of whom is a 40 year old with 20 years of experience working at a similar factory that recently downsized and the other is a 20 year old who's been working part time at McDonald's since he graduated high school... you're going to pick the guy with 20 years of experience... now those people are hitting an age where they can no longer do manual labor.

Due to the surplus of labor in those fields over the last generations, wages have been stagnant, they're just now rising, but it's too little too late to account for not recruiting enough new workers over the last decade.  Then there's the fact that most factories are now in rural America.  This has two problems.

First, many factories moved to these small towns due to the lower prevailing wages... the successful ones have now outgrown the town and there isn't a big enough local labor pool to feed them.  The other thing is, they didn't move to the nice small towns or the farming communities.  They moved to the run down ones... and those have just been completely devastated by heroin and meth in the last 20 years.

The only quick and easy band-aid to put on this bullet wound is to open up the borders.  There are a lot of people who would be willing to work at an American factory for $20.00 an hour.  Long term, the only way to fill the factories without immigrants is to keep pay consistently high enough to recruit new workers to the fields.

/Two cents
//Low level management at a factory
///These last two years have been awful


Murca
 
6 days ago  

Linux_Yes: electricjebus: Linux_Yes: BizarreMan: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

I was going to come in and say something about JIT and you beat me to it.  It's something I've been concerned about for a while.  All it takes is one wrench in the works and the whole house of cards comes crashing down.

What surprised me is that we didn't see more of it happening last year when the global shutdown was in effect.

If JIT rewards sit at home stock owners then JIT is wht you will GET

It really doesn't though.  It makes production less efficient as it's easier to set up a production line for one product and keep it on that product for as long as possible.  Changeovers create down time, wasted man hours and all sorts of maintenance issues.

It's better to have the supplies to keep making that product and the warehouse space to store it for as long as possible.  It's even better when you don't have to have low level managers deciding what product to changeover to when they realize they're out of a necessary material at midnight on a Wednesday.

So storage doesnt cost money that could be going to stock owners instead??

Why do you think JIT took off in the first place??   So i could get a fresher Asus router??


It did make sense from an idiot's perspective, up until about 2016/2017.  Then the labor shortages started really hitting hard with the pandemic eating their way into the factories that supply the factories that supply the factories that supply the retailers... that started costing the factories more.

There's no slack built into the system anymore.  Factories are trying to get away from this, but everything they order is going to backorders at their suppliers because they're running into the same farking problems.

I've been beating my head against a wall for the last 2 years over this issue and it's been my job to deal with this.
 
6 days ago  

Liadan: BizarreMan: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

I was going to come in and say something about JIT and you beat me to it.  It's something I've been concerned about for a while.  All it takes is one wrench in the works and the whole house of cards comes crashing down.

What surprised me is that we didn't see more of it happening last year when the global shutdown was in effect.

Demand for a bunch of stuff went down during the shutdown. We're noticing now because people are leaving their homes more regularly.

I'm employed at a smaller printing facility that is part of a much larger organization. The people at the top kept trying to cram JIT and low/no inventory down our throats for decades (I've been here 28 years) and one of the managers just kept quietly stock-piling the supplies that she knew we would need. Other than "heated discussion" at budget meetings it worked well.

Said manager was forced into retirement during the dramatic slow-down when Covid first hit. The team currently in charge is completely focused on kissing the asses of everyone higher-up. They've ignored basics like supply chains. All of our clients (government and education types) have been forced to return to their offices, at least part time, and our workload has exploded in the past five weeks.

The result? I've been waiting for an order of lamination material for THREE MONTHS. It exists somewhere, but nobody can get it to me. I'm also not printing on my office printer today because WE HAVE NO BLACK TONER CARTRIDGES. We are a goddamned PRINTING COMPANY and we have no toner in the supply closet.

/I need this place to stay afloat for four goddamned years so I can get old enough to get my full retirement benefits.
//It's not looking good.
///fark.


Limiting supply raises prices

Profit!
 
6 days ago  

Liadan: BizarreMan: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

I was going to come in and say something about JIT and you beat me to it.  It's something I've been concerned about for a while.  All it takes is one wrench in the works and the whole house of cards comes crashing down.

What surprised me is that we didn't see more of it happening last year when the global shutdown was in effect.

Demand for a bunch of stuff went down during the shutdown. We're noticing now because people are leaving their homes more regularly.

I'm employed at a smaller printing facility that is part of a much larger organization. The people at the top kept trying to cram JIT and low/no inventory down our throats for decades (I've been here 28 years) and one of the managers just kept quietly stock-piling the supplies that she knew we would need. Other than "heated discussion" at budget meetings it worked well.

Said manager was forced into retirement during the dramatic slow-down when Covid first hit. The team currently in charge is completely focused on kissing the asses of everyone higher-up. They've ignored basics like supply chains. All of our clients (government and education types) have been forced to return to their offices, at least part time, and our workload has exploded in the past five weeks.

The result? I've been waiting for an order of lamination material for THREE MONTHS. It exists somewhere, but nobody can get it to me. I'm also not printing on my office printer today because WE HAVE NO BLACK TONER CARTRIDGES. We are a goddamned PRINTING COMPANY and we have no toner in the supply closet.

/I need this place to stay afloat for four goddamned years so I can get old enough to get my full retirement benefits.
//It's not looking good.
///fark.


Oh

And used car salesman capitalism is a hellava drug.

Only stock owners matter now
 
6 days ago  

The Googles Do Nothing: NewportBarGuy: The Googles Do Nothing: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

Also durability enforcement, penalization of planned obsolescence and discardable goods.

The only way to do this in our system is a combination of taxes and penalties to convince overseas manufacturing to come back home, carrots for good boys and girls who do onshore, and guillotines for the rest.

Do you want to pay more for your Toyota?  Because this is how you'll pay more for your Toyota!

Well, considering most Toyotas are made here in the US. It's also a Japanese company so all the profits, outside of wages paid domestically, go back to Japan.

I think VW, Toyota, Mercedes make more vehicles in the US than the Big Three do. I could be wrong about that, but I vaguely remember an article about that.

It could be any manufacturing company, I just used Toyota because they perfected JIT and were the subject of many Harvard Business Review case studies.


Haaavad

Murca
 
6 days ago  

offacue: BizarreMan: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

I was going to come in and say something about JIT and you beat me to it.  It's something I've been concerned about for a while.  All it takes is one wrench in the works and the whole house of cards comes crashing down.

What surprised me is that we didn't see more of it happening last year when the global shutdown was in effect.

But, but, but, there are procedures in place to ensure that nothing can go wrong.  Consultant companies who have no idea what we do told us how to do it and wrote up SOP's to follow.  Nothing can possibly go wrong if we follow the procedures.  We paid them millions.  These new people are so much better than the last consultants we paid millions to, their way was wrong, the new people said so.  Plus, my brother in law works for them.


Very good Yoda
 
6 days ago  

Rapmaster2000: The Googles Do Nothing: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

Also durability enforcement, penalization of planned obsolescence and discardable goods.

The only way to do this in our system is a combination of taxes and penalties to convince overseas manufacturing to come back home, carrots for good boys and girls who do onshore, and guillotines for the rest.

Do you want to pay more for your Toyota?  Because this is how you'll pay more for your Toyota!

[Fark user image image 470x542]


Murca
 
6 days ago  

NewportBarGuy: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

[tse3.mm.bing.net image 270x210]

Yeah... I'm sure Apollo Group, Cerberus, Bain, and the rest will get RIGHT on that. Face it, we're f*cked. Giving them tax incentives to move sh*t offshore was probably the dumbest possible thing we've ever done. And we've done some really stupid sh*t.

We're not going to convince them to move it back here, not with the disparity in labor costs. They'll just move their tax center or HQ off shore, the ones that haven't already, and fart in our general direction.


The death of domestic manufacturing has been greatly exaggerated.  Domestic manufacturing has grown every year for decades (barring recessions).  The US has the second largest manufacturing base of any country (China is number one, of course).  Now, imports have grown too.  (IE, people today buy more stuff per person and the population has grown.  The size of domestic manufacturing has grown, but by less than the per capita increase plus population increase.)

The only thing in the US that has shrank is employment in manufacturing, which means lots of people are being replaced by robots and other automation.  But the total value of stuff made is as high as it has ever been.
 
6 days ago  

electricjebus: Linux_Yes: electricjebus: Linux_Yes: BizarreMan: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

I was going to come in and say something about JIT and you beat me to it.  It's something I've been concerned about for a while.  All it takes is one wrench in the works and the whole house of cards comes crashing down.

What surprised me is that we didn't see more of it happening last year when the global shutdown was in effect.

If JIT rewards sit at home stock owners then JIT is wht you will GET

It really doesn't though.  It makes production less efficient as it's easier to set up a production line for one product and keep it on that product for as long as possible.  Changeovers create down time, wasted man hours and all sorts of maintenance issues.

It's better to have the supplies to keep making that product and the warehouse space to store it for as long as possible.  It's even better when you don't have to have low level managers deciding what product to changeover to when they realize they're out of a necessary material at midnight on a Wednesday.

So storage doesnt cost money that could be going to stock owners instead??

Why do you think JIT took off in the first place??   So i could get a fresher Asus router??

It did make sense from an idiot's perspective, up until about 2016/2017.  Then the labor shortages started really hitting hard with the pandemic eating their way into the factories that supply the factories that supply the factories that supply the retailers... that started costing the factories more.

There's no slack built into the system anymore.  Factories are trying to get away from this, but everything they order is going to backorders at their suppliers because they're running into the same farking problems.

I've been beating my head against a wall for the last 2 years over this issue and it's been my job to deal with this.


I know the OTR trucking industry has been short 50K+ drivers over the last 6 years that i know of.

Drivers make half what they did 30 years ago in Real Wages.

Turnover ranges from 90 to 110% per year.

The OTR trucking industry calls it churn and burn.

I blame covid......
 
6 days ago  

Geotpf: NewportBarGuy: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

[tse3.mm.bing.net image 270x210]

Yeah... I'm sure Apollo Group, Cerberus, Bain, and the rest will get RIGHT on that. Face it, we're f*cked. Giving them tax incentives to move sh*t offshore was probably the dumbest possible thing we've ever done. And we've done some really stupid sh*t.

We're not going to convince them to move it back here, not with the disparity in labor costs. They'll just move their tax center or HQ off shore, the ones that haven't already, and fart in our general direction.

The death of domestic manufacturing has been greatly exaggerated.  Domestic manufacturing has grown every year for decades (barring recessions).  The US has the second largest manufacturing base of any country (China is number one, of course).  Now, imports have grown too.  (IE, people today buy more stuff per person and the population has grown.  The size of domestic manufacturing has grown, but by less than the per capita increase plus population increase.)

The only thing in the US that has shrank is employment in manufacturing, which means lots of people are being replaced by robots and other automation.  But the total value of stuff made is as high as it has ever been.


Thank you
 
6 days ago  

NewportBarGuy: The Googles Do Nothing: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

Also durability enforcement, penalization of planned obsolescence and discardable goods.

The only way to do this in our system is a combination of taxes and penalties to convince overseas manufacturing to come back home, carrots for good boys and girls who do onshore, and guillotines for the rest.

Do you want to pay more for your Toyota?  Because this is how you'll pay more for your Toyota!

Well, considering most Toyotas are made here in the US. It's also a Japanese company so all the profits, outside of wages paid domestically, go back to Japan.

I think VW, Toyota, Mercedes make more vehicles in the US than the Big Three do. I could be wrong about that, but I vaguely remember an article about that.


The US makes around 4.1 million vehicles a year

China makes around 16 milliion.
 
6 days ago  

Northern: NewportBarGuy: The Googles Do Nothing: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

Also durability enforcement, penalization of planned obsolescence and discardable goods.

The only way to do this in our system is a combination of taxes and penalties to convince overseas manufacturing to come back home, carrots for good boys and girls who do onshore, and guillotines for the rest.

Do you want to pay more for your Toyota?  Because this is how you'll pay more for your Toyota!

Well, considering most Toyotas are made here in the US. It's also a Japanese company so all the profits, outside of wages paid domestically, go back to Japan.

I think VW, Toyota, Mercedes make more vehicles in the US than the Big Three do. I could be wrong about that, but I vaguely remember an article about that.

Manufacturing even in China now is highly automated since Chinese wages are much higher than 20 years ago (for skilled labor it's at parity with the US).
And it's not just manufacturing sites, but also raw materials.  China has extended it's power to the world to gather materials to supply their manufacturing sector, and have them firmly in their control via the China development bank, roads, rail, shipping, and contracts / foreign aid to foreign officials (bribes too). We also ceded the global supply chain to China.  They build infrastructure and gain global influence with the best of the best in their communist party while we argue over wearing masks and oppressing half of the population while eating horse ivermectin paste through the barrel of an AR-15 clone.
We're basically the old fat Elvis coked out in a bedazzled jumpsuit, a caricature of our former power and status.


Eventually every Empires reach exceeds its grasp and they fail.

There was a Dream that was Rome.
 
6 days ago  
We're running out of usable caps for our bottles at work. The foil seals just don't seal, making the whole run non-compliant. It's a lot of fun having the same problem every day and the only solution is to ignore that there's a problem because wait no that's not a solution, that's just another problem!
 
6 days ago  

yohohogreengiant: NewportBarGuy: yohohogreengiant: We need to onshore production again and recognize JIT manufacturing is simply too fragile and not robust or redundant enough to keep us moving forward.

[tse3.mm.bing.net image 270x210]

Yeah... I'm sure Apollo Group, Cerberus, Bain, and the rest will get RIGHT on that. Face it, we're f*cked. Giving them tax incentives to move sh*t offshore was probably the dumbest possible thing we've ever done. And we've done some really stupid sh*t.

We're not going to convince them to move it back here, not with the disparity in labor costs. They'll just move their tax center or HQ off shore, the ones that haven't already, and fart in our general direction.

You're incapable of reading the last sentence.

Hence guillotines.

I'm not being facetious.


I'm OK with that end-game... I'm just sure a lot of people won't really like how bloody that gets. They'd rather just trudge through life living off the scraps and not have to realize how screwed we really are.

Blue Pill/Red Pill... We can't even get people to realize that fighting for better wages would help all of us, not just the burger flippers.

I agree with your newsletter, I'm just not sure enough people will subscribe to it.
 
6 days ago  

Linux_Yes: FormlessOne: My neighborhood Safeway looks like we were told a massive winter storm was coming tomorrow. It's cleaned out.

Limiting supply raises prices

Profit!


Sad, but true - and horribly so in some cases, as some producers are deliberately limiting supply.
 
6 days ago  
Thankfully I buy all my booze in plastic bottles.
 
6 days ago  

Linux_Yes: I know the OTR trucking industry has been short 50K+ drivers over the last 6 years that i know of.

Drivers make half what they did 30 years ago in Real Wages.

Turnover ranges from 90 to 110% per year.

The OTR trucking industry calls it churn and burn.

I blame covid......



OTR trucking has always been short term employment.  People go into it to get into truck driving in the first place because they don't know anybody willing to hire them for an entry level job.  When they get their CDL paid for and enough experience to move into a dedicated route or even local CDL truck driving they usually do so immediately.

Living in a cab and washing your feet in warehouse bathroom sinks is a shiatty way to go about life and lot lizards make urban trans hookers look like high end escorts.

Real wages have dropped in that industry because the handful of long timers in that area are owner operators... they have to pay for their own trucks and their own fuel... which has gone up a lot in the last 30 years.  The Teamsters are basically gone, and manual labor wages have been stagnating for that entire time due to a glut of supply in workers.
 
6 days ago  

FormlessOne: Linux_Yes: FormlessOne: My neighborhood Safeway looks like we were told a massive winter storm was coming tomorrow. It's cleaned out.

Limiting supply raises prices

Profit!

Sad, but true - and horribly so in some cases, as some producers are deliberately limiting supply.


ATT was caught hiding dark fiber in the ground to keep their network use costs high.  Gov help laying fiber then keeping most of it dark.
 
6 days ago  

electricjebus: Linux_Yes: I know the OTR trucking industry has been short 50K+ drivers over the last 6 years that i know of.

Drivers make half what they did 30 years ago in Real Wages.

Turnover ranges from 90 to 110% per year.

The OTR trucking industry calls it churn and burn.

I blame covid......


OTR trucking has always been short term employment.  People go into it to get into truck driving in the first place because they don't know anybody willing to hire them for an entry level job.  When they get their CDL paid for and enough experience to move into a dedicated route or even local CDL truck driving they usually do so immediately.

Living in a cab and washing your feet in warehouse bathroom sinks is a shiatty way to go about life and lot lizards make urban trans hookers look like high end escorts.

Real wages have dropped in that industry because the handful of long timers in that area are owner operators... they have to pay for their own trucks and their own fuel... which has gone up a lot in the last 30 years.  The Teamsters are basically gone, and manual labor wages have been stagnating for that entire time due to a glut of supply in workers.


Short term??

20 year drivers sound short term to you??

Your wiggle room is shrinking.
 
6 days ago  

electricjebus: Linux_Yes: I know the OTR trucking industry has been short 50K+ drivers over the last 6 years that i know of.

Drivers make half what they did 30 years ago in Real Wages.

Turnover ranges from 90 to 110% per year.

The OTR trucking industry calls it churn and burn.

I blame covid......


OTR trucking has always been short term employment.  People go into it to get into truck driving in the first place because they don't know anybody willing to hire them for an entry level job.  When they get their CDL paid for and enough experience to move into a dedicated route or even local CDL truck driving they usually do so immediately.

Living in a cab and washing your feet in warehouse bathroom sinks is a shiatty way to go about life and lot lizards make urban trans hookers look like high end escorts.

Real wages have dropped in that industry because the handful of long timers in that area are owner operators... they have to pay for their own trucks and their own fuel... which has gone up a lot in the last 30 years.  The Teamsters are basically gone, and manual labor wages have been stagnating for that entire time due to a glut of supply in workers.


You must have gone to Haaavad to learn that propaganda
 
6 days ago  

PerryWinnwet: We're running out of usable caps for our bottles at work. The foil seals just don't seal, making the whole run non-compliant. It's a lot of fun having the same problem every day and the only solution is to ignore that there's a problem because wait no that's not a solution, that's just another problem!


Sounds like red china 30 years ago.
 
kab
6 days ago  
Add paint to that list.

Well, some brands anyhow.
 
6 days ago  

Linux_Yes: electricjebus: Linux_Yes: I know the OTR trucking industry has been short 50K+ drivers over the last 6 years that i know of.

Drivers make half what they did 30 years ago in Real Wages.

Turnover ranges from 90 to 110% per year.

The OTR trucking industry calls it churn and burn.

I blame covid......


OTR trucking has always been short term employment.  People go into it to get into truck driving in the first place because they don't know anybody willing to hire them for an entry level job.  When they get their CDL paid for and enough experience to move into a dedicated route or even local CDL truck driving they usually do so immediately.

Living in a cab and washing your feet in warehouse bathroom sinks is a shiatty way to go about life and lot lizards make urban trans hookers look like high end escorts.

Real wages have dropped in that industry because the handful of long timers in that area are owner operators... they have to pay for their own trucks and their own fuel... which has gone up a lot in the last 30 years.  The Teamsters are basically gone, and manual labor wages have been stagnating for that entire time due to a glut of supply in workers.

You must have gone to Haaavad to learn that propaganda


State school ed

Linux_Yes: electricjebus: Linux_Yes: I know the OTR trucking industry has been short 50K+ drivers over the last 6 years that i know of.

Drivers make half what they did 30 years ago in Real Wages.

Turnover ranges from 90 to 110% per year.

The OTR trucking industry calls it churn and burn.

I blame covid......


OTR trucking has always been short term employment.  People go into it to get into truck driving in the first place because they don't know anybody willing to hire them for an entry level job.  When they get their CDL paid for and enough experience to move into a dedicated route or even local CDL truck driving they usually do so immediately.

Living in a cab and washing your feet in warehouse bathroom sinks is a shiatty way to go about life and lot lizards make urban trans hookers look like high end escorts.

Real wages have dropped in that industry because the handful of long timers in that area are owner operators... they have to pay for their own trucks and their own fuel... which has gone up a lot in the last 30 years.  The Teamsters are basically gone, and manual labor wages have been stagnating for that entire time due to a glut of supply in workers.

Short term??

20 year drivers sound short term to you??

Your wiggle room is shrinking.


Are you dense?  I know your kernel isn't simple, but what about you?

Most people don't go into OTR trucking as a career, and haven't for generations.  It's an entry level job in truck driving.
 
6 days ago  

FormlessOne: My neighborhood Safeway looks like we were told a massive winter storm was coming tomorrow. It's cleaned out.


I went to Aldi today for my usual weekly shopping and there were so many empty spots...it's been like this for a while now. I've noticed it a but more subtly at other stores, but Aldi seems particularly bad. Empty frozen food cases, basic produce items absent, bottled juice and other drinks completely cleaned out, etc.
 
5 days ago  
Good. Americans need way less f fewer food for our enormous fat asses, and way fewer less disposable products designed to secure an extra moment of bougie ease. We've forgotten everything about living yet have become exquisite purveyors of purchasing power. We race to see who has the largest pile of cheaply produced, expensive plastic shiat. It's farked, we're doomed, you're doomed, your ill-conceived yet still stu[pidly conceived crotchfruit are doomed, it's all doomed.

We're not going to Mars, the bees aren't going to hail-mary a return to pollination, the water tables aren't going to miraculously fill, the horrendous amount of unnecesary trash each of us generates in a single day isn't going to miraculously disappear, the odious poisonous excreta from insider-regulated capitalism isn't going to congeal into nice, easily manageable units for collection. The water is rising and the land isn't, the midwest is as hot and contrarian as it's ever been, and people like me and you think typing shiat on some dumb website based on dangling ballsacks is farking doing something.

And as a reacharound to this chipped fingernail in the ass of this stinking toothy blowjob, so many people for whom my whole life I've loved and respected, and some that were such deep friends I can't even find the words to describe the breadth and scope of my feelings, have all decided a supposed billionaire is one of the(ir) people, that their knee-jerk beliefs are equitable to rigorous scientific processes, and that the only way forward towards true American 'freedom' is to cede the entirety of their agency to the enormous farking thresher smoking its way headlong into everything they've spent their lives building. This isn't tearing the system down, this is giving everything away to the people that already own everything else. For free. For nothing.

Who gives a fark that things aren't on the shelves? Soon enough we'll be complaining that there's a shortage of shelves, which is fine since there'll be a shortage of places to put them. There's a shortage of everything on the horizon. There were 4.15 billion people when I was born, and there are 7.8 billion now. I don't even have gray hair on my bush yet. We're farked, and there's no unfarkery available. It's coming. It's real. And we're all to blame.

I hate that I'm a nihilist and I blame everyone.
 
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