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(Merriam-Webster)   The Merriam-Webster word of the day for September 9 is 'brogue,' as in: "There's nothing worse than being the leader of a gang of thieves and finding out that one of your henchmen is a brogue'   (merriam-webster.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Australia, Acute accent, Scotland, Language, annual trip, Old Norse, Word, Speech disorder  
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899 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Sep 2021 at 9:31 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



26 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-09-09 7:13:13 PM  
First year of college one of my friends got sucked into a frat and then eventually came back to us normal. He had gone brogue.
 
2021-09-09 7:47:16 PM  
Thanks, Anglicans, for dropping an important vowel to distinguish the words.  Now, I have to pay attention to context.
 
2021-09-09 9:32:50 PM  
Always Oxfords
 
2021-09-09 9:34:52 PM  
But that's not what he said-he distinctly said "To brogue" and as we all know, to brogue means to bluff, heh? So you were probably playing cards, and he cheated-
 
2021-09-09 9:35:05 PM  
Paddraig o'Shaunessy here to tell you fine folk what a brogue is!

It's a shoe, lad!

What did you think I was gonna say?
 
2021-09-09 9:35:40 PM  
At least he's not a Paladin. That would be awkward.
 
2021-09-09 9:36:43 PM  
Did you expect brogue to be defined as "an Irish accent"? You're probably not alone; however, brogue has two homographs (words that are spelled-and, in this case, pronounced-the same but have different origins or parts of speech). Today we're featuring brogue, the shoe, which comes from the Irish word bróg and probably derives from an Old Norse term meaning "leg covering." Brogue, the accent, comes from a different Irish word, barróg, which means "accent" or "speech impediment."

God farking damnit do I hate English sometimes.
 
2021-09-09 9:44:00 PM  
You're either speaking in tongues, or wearing them.
 
2021-09-09 9:45:13 PM  

Teddy Brosevelt: Always Oxfords


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2021-09-09 9:45:15 PM  
Pronounced "Brog-way" like in the song "Give My Regards to Brogue".
 
2021-09-09 9:53:41 PM  
So we know what Merriam-Webster says, but what about the Oxford take?  Is there agreement?

Just waiting for the other shoe to drop...
 
2021-09-09 9:54:18 PM  
Does it come in rouge?!
 
2021-09-09 9:55:18 PM  
external-content.duckduckgo.comView Full Size

You misspelled drouge
 
2021-09-09 9:56:22 PM  
It's pronounced brogue.  Accent on the whiskey.

Fight me.
 
2021-09-09 10:00:18 PM  
Trocadero:

God farking damnit do I hate English sometimes.


^

The Irish pledge of allegiance.
 
2021-09-09 10:03:15 PM  
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2021-09-09 10:03:30 PM  
There was a horse in a Saki short story called the Brogue, because once acquired he was hard to shake off.
 
2021-09-09 10:05:42 PM  
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Gives new meaning to the game.
 
2021-09-09 10:14:12 PM  
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2021-09-09 10:16:17 PM  
If one of my players wanted to run a CHA based rogue and said it was a brogue, I would totally allow it.
 
2021-09-10 12:27:36 AM  
Bróg is the Irish for shoe, it's the same pronunciation, that explains the shoe connection. But I've no idea how it's connected to the Irish accent
 
2021-09-10 2:03:07 AM  

Jumpthruhoops: If one of my players wanted to run a CHA based rogue and said it was a brogue, I would totally allow it.


Kinda like a thief/assassin known for wearing all red.  Class?  Rouge
 
2021-09-10 6:21:40 AM  

thealgorerhythm: [external-content.duckduckgo.com image 474x268]
You misspelled drouge


So did you.

"What's it going to be then, eh? There was me, that is Alex, and my three droogs, that is Pete, Georgie, and Dim, Dim being really dim, and we sat in the Korova Milkbar making up our rassoodocks what to do with the evening, a flip dark chill winter bastard though dry."
 
2021-09-10 6:54:52 AM  

Pert: thealgorerhythm: [external-content.duckduckgo.com image 474x268]
You misspelled drouge

So did you.

"What's it going to be then, eh? There was me, that is Alex, and my three droogs, that is Pete, Georgie, and Dim, Dim being really dim, and we sat in the Korova Milkbar making up our rassoodocks what to do with the evening, a flip dark chill winter bastard though dry."


Alex realised that his droogs had become a drogue and were holding him back.
 
2021-09-10 9:34:48 AM  

mchaboud: So we know what Merriam-Webster says, but what about the Oxford take?  Is there agreement?

Just waiting for the other shoe to drop...


Funnily enough, Susie Dent covered the word on Countdown the other day. Oxford's opinion is that it comes purely from the shoe, because Irish/Scots who wore the shoes tended to have thick accents.

Tie break goes to etymonline.com, which gives barroga "perhaps" source for a strong accent.
 
2021-09-10 10:35:19 AM  

Cormee: Bróg is the Irish for shoe, it's the same pronunciation, that explains the shoe connection. But I've no idea how it's connected to the Irish accent


As I've heard it explained, at the time, the practice of making shoes with incomplete/scrap pieces of leather (to reduce cost) was common in Ireland.

Then someone got all fancy with it, and here we are.
 
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