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(Atomic Scientists Bulletin)   I have had it with these Mothra-fighting snakes on this Fukushima plane   (thebulletin.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, Chernobyl disaster, help of snakes, Fukushima's native rat snakes, Pollution, Radioactive contamination, Nuclear safety, Hannah Gerke, Snake  
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735 clicks; posted to STEM » on 29 Aug 2021 at 4:50 AM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-08-29 6:30:52 AM  
Googles Hannah Gerke....

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I'd let it teach me about herps....
 
2021-08-29 6:51:06 AM  
Interesting article.  That's a very lush and green region.  Fukushima is split into three major sections by two mountain chains.  There's ocean-side Fukushima (浜通り), middle Fukushima (中通り ), and Aizu, (会津) an isolated place full of people with very strong regional accents who carry strong feelings about being on the losing side of the Civil War (防振戦争).

The three main towns destroyed by the nuclear disaster were Namie, Futaba and Tomioka.  Namie and Futaba are toast.  Tomioka was a major regional hub city where everyone in the hill towns went to work and shop.  I understand the shopping district had some success in being rebuilt, but the residential district is done.

People who lived in these three cities before the great earthquake can still claim residency, so they have paper populations despite being ghost towns.  Of course, Namie, Futaba and most of Tomioka should be bulldozed because they're never going to be resettled, especially in a country with a declining population, but Japan pretends they're still viable for the purpose of national pride by pouring money into a giant pit. 

It's been many years since I toured the area.  I should go back sometime when I have a few days off work.
 
2021-08-29 8:30:55 AM  

Baron Harkonnen: Interesting article.  That's a very lush and green region.  Fukushima is split into three major sections by two mountain chains.  There's ocean-side Fukushima (浜通り), middle Fukushima (中通り ), and Aizu, (会津) an isolated place full of people with very strong regional accents who carry strong feelings about being on the losing side of the Civil War (防振戦争).

The three main towns destroyed by the nuclear disaster were Namie, Futaba and Tomioka.  Namie and Futaba are toast.Tomioka was a major regional hub city where everyone in the hill towns went to work and shop.  I understand the shopping district had some success in being rebuilt, but the residential district is done.

People who lived in these three cities before the great earthquake can still claim residency, so they have paper populations despite being ghost towns.  Of course, Namie, Futaba and most of Tomioka should be bulldozed because they're never going to be resettled, especially in a country with a declining population, but Japan pretends they're still viable for the purpose of national pride by pouring money into a giant pit. 

It's been many years since I toured the area.  I should go back sometime when I have a few days off work.


Pretty sad that you have to demagogue the people of the area like this. You and the BAS just can't resist a chance to exaggerate damage and brag to your buds about how you visited the area once.

These three places you mention are not TOAST, and they were not DESTROYED. They were affected by the tsunami and subsequent edicts by the national government about when people have been allowed to return to these and other nearby areas. That government and the local governments of Fukushima have been cowed by hysteria and radiation fear that gets kicked up now and again by people like Greenpeace and BAS, who can not pass up an opportunity to harangue everyone about how they are going to die from radiation.

Well. That is the heat. Here is the light....

When an area is affected by a disaster, people need to understand that repopulating the area requires human beings, who are probably going to have some uneasiness about moving back to an area even under the best of circumstances. That has to occur almost simultaneously with the provision of services, such as stores, utilities, and jobs. It becomes a chicken and egg problem. Services can't be provided efficiently if people do not move back, and people will not move back if there are inadequate services. Growth has been anemic. What definitely does NOT help is feeding people the impression that the area is doomed by radiation or by bulldozers.

I have driven through the area and stopped where possible an average of twice a year for the last decade. I am pretty sure Namie has been opened up for the last five years or so. Futaba and Tomioka not so much. Areas that the local people want bulldozed are being bulldozed, and that is fine. Foreigners telling them what they should do is a pretty deplorable take.

My recollection is that Namie is up to about 50% of its pre-quake population. They have been growing strawberries and doing the things that they used to do. Futaba and Tomioka, to the degree that they are being repopulated, are home to people working mostly on reconstructing the area. Many many of the people who used to reside in these areas have had their interests bought out, and they are unlikely to return.

A point of difficulty, and a point of particular sadness, is that most residents of these areas were elderly. Had they simply been allowed to go back to their homes, they would have been able to live out their days comfortably with a very small probability of developing any illness caused by the low levels of radiation.

So let me say again that whatever agenda someone has, just leave these people out of it. They deserve to decide where they will live without fear of bulldozers coming to take what they have left. A lot of people have moved on, sucked it up, and taken the loss. Others are trying to make a go of it in a land where their families grew up.
 
2021-08-29 8:47:59 AM  
Regarding the study, let me just say that it sounds to me like the Bureau of Atomic Scientists is struggling to stay relevant, and it shows.

If I really wanted to know about radiation in the affected area of Fukushima, I would check, oh, local university data, regional university data, local, regional and national health data. I could check studies that have been reported in English and Japanese of just about every kind of local wildlife you can imagine. Insects, fish, boars, dogs, cows, whatever. It has been done. I could check data compiled by TEPCO, the local electric utility, water data, research done by just about every utility in Japan to study radiation effects in the area. I could check stories and data compiled by the several local newspapers, and the various documentaries done of the area over the last decade. All the sources, all the science, shows the same story.

In short, the goofy notion that someone is going to learn a lot about snakes and radiation from yet another study is ludicrous. The study is "valuable" in the sense that research into Charlemagne's mistresses is "valuable". Go have fun doing your study, but there is not a lot about radiation in Fukushima that is not known. And we are not going to learn it from snakes.

During the last decade, radionuclides have left the humus horizons of the soil and have worked down to the clay layer. There are some particles in tree bark that show hotspots sometimes. For a year or so, the local riverine areas were showing higher radiation because they were catchments of radionuclides that were rinsed off of flora. Now that has all been washed to the ocean. They have gone to the ocean, where they have been quickly dispersed or covered by sediments.

Would I keep a snake from Fukushima as a pet? Sure. Or frogs. Or a dog. I would eat fish and fruit from the area. And leafy green vegetables. I would probably not eat a boar or a cow older than five years old. That is where I would draw the line. If I were 70 or 80, I would not even care about the meaty animals.
 
2021-08-29 9:10:58 AM  
And finally, this next part I am hesitant to share, simply because I don't want a lot of foreigners moving like carpet baggers to Fukushima.

The coast all along Fukushima is more or less Santa Barbara without the jackholes, high taxes, crowded traffic, ugly apartment buildings, crowded dirty beaches, noisy watercraft, whining college kids, and whatever else you might think you would hate about Santa Barbara. SUVs, rich people, NIMBYs, you name it, Fukushima hasn't got it.

Day after day on Fark I read about everything that is screwed up with crowded, expensive environments full of crazy people. If I told you that there is a place where you can drive to skiing in 10 minutes and surfing in 20 minutes and get lift tickets for the former for 15 bucks a day and you can park all day with your car unlocked while you go surfing, would you believe me? You could visit hot springs every weekend for three years before you would run out of good places. The food is awesome. The service is better. The prices are great, and no tips. Or go to a McDonalds and be greeted by an intelligent, clean, decently educated person who does not care what color you are. They have ONE JOB, and they do it. And nobody is itching to start trouble or cause a scene.

Wait. I have said too much.

Please everyone, go back to thinking that the whole EAST coast of Japan is devastated and a moonscape. Never ever get the idea that it is just like the WEST coast of the US was in... oh.... 1960. Get that image out of your mind immediately.

The obvious question is "If Fukushima's coast is so great, why doesn't anyone want to live there?" Well. Fair enough. The easy answer is that older people are concerned that they do not have access to services and health care that they need. Young people are having trouble finding good jobs there. Those are the same reasons people do not want to live in Sea Ranch, CA, but everyone wants to live in Sea Ranch, if you catch my drift.

There is my honest perspective. I doubt people will see it the same way I do, but that is probably for the best anyway.
 
2021-08-29 9:13:03 AM  

2fardownthread: Pretty sad that you have to demagogue the people of the area like this. You and the BAS just can't resist a chance to exaggerate damage and brag to your buds about how you visited the area once.


No, dude, I wasn't doing that, and it's pretty shiatty you're accusing me of it.  I visited that place once in 2016 because I wanted to see for myself all the damage once the rubberneckers had gone.  And those places were gone, gone, gone.  Also, what the fark BAS?  I've never heard that term before.

2fardownthread: These three places you mention are not TOAST, and they were not DESTROYED.


Yes, they are.  They're done for.  They're gone and they're never coming back.  And to claim that underpopulated ghost towns is a sign of recovery is just a crappy thing to claim. 
Fukushima Mieruka Project: Konno Sumio, who evacuated from Namie Town in Fukushima Prefecture
Youtube 1G3_9f5g8HM


Here's a returner to Namie telling about his situation.

Here's a visitor giving a walking tour in Futaba in 2020.  Click on any timestamp in the video and watch for one minute and tell me how their reconstruction effort is going along.


Don't give me this attitude, I was here. I don't want to be your enemy, but these are the facts.  I was here when it happened and I never evacuated.  I stayed thru the entire thing when friends of mine either left out of fear or were forced to evacuate against their will.  I love this prefecture.  This is my home now, and I'm a lifer.  So don't treat me like a first-year JET teacher when I state the obvious.  These places are F*CKed, they will never recover and the power of believing will not make it so.
 
2021-08-29 9:14:15 AM  
Fukushima: Futaba (双葉町) - Japan Walking Tour (July 21, 2021)
Youtube sj-xRubNtZs


Here's the Futaba video I tried to link in my Boobies, apparently only one video is allowed per post.
 
2021-08-29 9:33:59 AM  
Mr Itakura Masao who returned to live in Tomioka Town, Fukushima Prefecture.
Youtube Kq5wj4e9Isw


And because I didn't want to leave Tomioka out, here's a survivor talking about his city's recovery.

2downfarthread: Obviously, I'm talking about things I don't understand, right?  A few more years and everything will be back to normal.  My opinion recovery of the region is a giant money pit is completely misinformed. 
What I'm saying is don't pretend.  Complete the demolition of these cities and let them return to nature.  Doing this is not a failure.  It's a fact.  Use resources earmarked for impossible recoveries for far better things.
 
2021-08-29 1:48:46 PM  
For a decade, I have watched people say awful things about Fukishima people, their government, their hopes, and their experiences, and almost all of them have been foreigners. ALL of them have been influenced by foreigners. Today I found a tourist who just wants to bulldoze everything... for some reason that escapes me.

If someone wants to say their opinions, well be my guest. If they want to post videos of a few people, sure. But when ONE PERSON says that the best thing to do is to bulldoze a bunch of people's homes, many ancestral homes, against the express wishes and policies of the persons and an elected government, that person can leave. Fukushima is solving its own problems and other people and governments are helping. That is perfectly fine.

The Boobies of one commenter identified a person as a tourist who wants to visit Fukushima again. Sounds about right. A tourist is going to tell native Japanese how they should organize their affairs and backs it up with YouTube videos.  If some foreign person is impatient because they have lived there a decade, well, get in line. A lot of people have lived there seven times as long.

Many people who have claims and hopes and desires about living where they grew up don't have "gofundme" videos and youtube presence to plead their cases. There are plenty of "documentaries" that have been put together to drive wedges between governments and advance policies without due process and electoral decisions. The issues are complex. Service of agendas has motivated a lot of the rancor.

I have been here much much longer than a decade. I say that if people do not want their cities bulldozed, that is good enough for me. And no video is going to push or prod or herd me into thinking that I am going to tell those people what is best for them. A lot of people want to make a go of living there again, and I will support that. To my knowledge, all of them have options and alternatives, and if they reject them and want to keep a claim to their land, that is perfectly ok. Those are property rights. That is how they work.

Whatever country this bulldozing nonsense comes from, take it back, please. It sounds American to me. Just guessing, but it does sound like an American to go invade a country, bulldoze the locals to save them, and then skip town.  Fukushima does not need fascism and jackboots. Let them decide what they are going to do.
 
2021-08-30 12:48:12 AM  

2fardownthread: For a decade, I have watched people say awful things about Fukishima people, their government, their hopes, and their experiences, and almost all of them have been foreigners. ALL of them have been influenced by foreigners. Today I found a tourist who just wants to bulldoze everything... for some reason that escapes me.

If someone wants to say their opinions, well be my guest. If they want to post videos of a few people, sure. But when ONE PERSON says that the best thing to do is to bulldoze a bunch of people's homes, many ancestral homes, against the express wishes and policies of the persons and an elected government, that person can leave. Fukushima is solving its own problems and other people and governments are helping. That is perfectly fine.

The Boobies of one commenter identified a person as a tourist who wants to visit Fukushima again. Sounds about right. A tourist is going to tell native Japanese how they should organize their affairs and backs it up with YouTube videos.  If some foreign person is impatient because they have lived there a decade, well, get in line. A lot of people have lived there seven times as long.

Many people who have claims and hopes and desires about living where they grew up don't have "gofundme" videos and youtube presence to plead their cases. There are plenty of "documentaries" that have been put together to drive wedges between governments and advance policies without due process and electoral decisions. The issues are complex. Service of agendas has motivated a lot of the rancor.

I have been here much much longer than a decade. I say that if people do not want their cities bulldozed, that is good enough for me. And no video is going to push or prod or herd me into thinking that I am going to tell those people what is best for them. A lot of people want to make a go of living there again, and I will support that. To my knowledge, all of them have options and alternatives, and if they reject them and want to keep a claim to their land, that is perfectly ok. Those are property rights. That is how they work.

Whatever country this bulldozing nonsense comes from, take it back, please. It sounds American to me. Just guessing, but it does sound like an American to go invade a country, bulldoze the locals to save them, and then skip town.  Fukushima does not need fascism and jackboots. Let them decide what they are going to do.


I see that little talk we had about your exotification of the Japanese didn't sink in at all.
 
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