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(Salon)   Give canned chickpeas a chance   (salon.com) divider line
    More: Unlikely, Chickpea, part of a farm system, Hummus, Amanda Mull, cans of chickpeas, sauteed chickpeas, crispy grandeur, garbanzo beans  
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582 clicks; posted to Food » on 28 Aug 2021 at 7:15 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-08-28 12:34:10 AM  
Meh, I prefer garbanzo beans myself.
 
2021-08-28 12:42:49 AM  
Peel the ceci (chickpeas, garbanzos) before grinding them for hummus.
Never add olive oil to the ceci while grinding.
Use enough garlic and more tahini than you think necessary.
Only fresh lemon, not the bottled shiat.

And save the liquid from the can...add to ceci while grinding.

You're welcome.
 
2021-08-28 12:49:03 AM  
It's love to, but one serving of canned anything is pretty-much my sodium allowance for the entire day.
 
2021-08-28 1:42:47 AM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: It's love to, but one serving of canned anything is pretty-much my sodium allowance for the entire day.


Even after rinsing?  I've always thought the repeated rinsing got rid of the sodium.  Dang, I love rinsing a can of beans and dumping them in a salad.
 
2021-08-28 1:57:30 AM  

cherryl taggart: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's love to, but one serving of canned anything is pretty-much my sodium allowance for the entire day.

Even after rinsing?  I've always thought the repeated rinsing got rid of the sodium.  Dang, I love rinsing a can of beans and dumping them in a salad.


Rinsing will get rid of much of the sodium; most of it seems to be in the liquid the beans are soaking in. It would be interesting to get a measurement on how much is left afterward.
 
2021-08-28 2:26:05 AM  
I've never paid to have a garbanzo bean on my face.
 
2021-08-28 7:05:54 AM  

TwowheelinTim: Meh, I prefer garbanzo beans myself.


Came here to post that, see I was already eaten to the punch.
 
2021-08-28 7:25:19 AM  

TwowheelinTim: Meh, I prefer garbanzo beans myself.


I never paid $25 to watch a garbanzo bean.

//don't shame me
 
2021-08-28 7:27:55 AM  
Contrary to what the article says, raw chickpeas do not have to be soaked overnight; almost all other beans I soak but not chickpeas. You can cook one pound of raw chickpeas in just over four hours in a crock pot on high. 7.5 cups of water and ¼ teaspoon baking soda is all you need, stirring every hour or so. There's nothing wrong with canned chickpeas but using the crock pot method requires no soaking and delivers a garbanzo streets ahead of canned.
 
2021-08-28 7:30:35 AM  
No. Canned has a harsher environmental impact, contains preservatives and there is possible leaching from can lining plastics, and has a greater cost per pea.
 
2021-08-28 7:41:46 AM  

Porous Horace: No.


this is the only correct answer.
 
2021-08-28 7:48:25 AM  
Oh yeah, baking soda in the soak water reduces soak time and supposedly takes out some of the fartiness.
 
2021-08-28 7:55:20 AM  
Whom, us?
 
2021-08-28 7:58:14 AM  
The real debate should be canned chickpeas vs chickpea flour. You can soak chickpea flour but for most applications you don't need to do it very long. Then you can make stuff like socca, pakora, and extremely smooth hummus.
 
2021-08-28 8:19:27 AM  
I've never had good luck with dried/soaked any kind of beans.  No doubt I'm doing something wrong, but the always emerge from the soak/cooking in pieces.

Canned, no matter the brand, are always good, and convenient, and properly textured... or maybe I'm just used to the improper texture?  Doesn't really matter, because I prefer it at this point.
 
2021-08-28 8:25:23 AM  
Canned chickpeas are great for quick meals.

Benevolent Misanthrope: It's love to, but one serving of canned anything is pretty-much my sodium allowance for the entire day.


I have to watch sodium a bit too, but not nearly to the extent you do. I've had no problem finding "no salt added" canned chickpeas at a couple different stores. For those, the whole can works out to like 35 mg total.

In fact, most canned beans these days have a "no salt added" option.
 
2021-08-28 8:33:35 AM  

ImOscar: Contrary to what the article says, raw chickpeas do not have to be soaked overnight; almost all other beans I soak but not chickpeas. You can cook one pound of raw chickpeas in just over four hours in a crock pot on high. 7.5 cups of water and ¼ teaspoon baking soda is all you need, stirring every hour or so. There's nothing wrong with canned chickpeas but using the crock pot method requires no soaking and delivers a garbanzo streets ahead of canned.


Thanks!  I shall try this today.
 
2021-08-28 8:40:23 AM  
Canned beans (and this goes for red, kidney, whatever) are cooked and canned in a factory from... wait for it... commodity dry beans.  The biggest texture difference goes to pressure cooking, and while they don't build up quite as high a heat/overpressure as commercial units, millions of US households have got an Instant Pot or knockoff.
 
2021-08-28 8:48:21 AM  
Skip the dried v. canned debate and go with frozen green garbs.

https://freshnaturefoods.com
 
2021-08-28 8:59:46 AM  
I use chick peas so rarely, that it makes zero sense to keep dried ones around. Black beans, pinto beans, red beans, split peas, brown and jasmine rice - got bins full of them.
 
2021-08-28 9:12:37 AM  
external-content.duckduckgo.comView Full Size
 
2021-08-28 9:18:58 AM  

Porous Horace: Oh yeah, baking soda in the soak water reduces soak time and supposedly takes out some of the fartiness.


It also helps remove the skins.
 
2021-08-28 9:19:56 AM  
A friend of mine will rince the canned beans and then smoke them while other bbq is in work. Makes for a good dip.

Personally, I am mostly against chickpeas. Dips are OK but I get angry when the Indian buffet has chickpea based dals. I prefer the other dals with yellow or red lentils, or better yet, dal mahkani.
 
2021-08-28 9:26:44 AM  

McGrits: A friend of mine will rince the canned beans and then smoke them while other bbq is in work. Makes for a good dip.

Personally, I am mostly against chickpeas. Dips are OK but I get angry when the Indian buffet has chickpea based dals. I prefer the other dals with yellow or red lentils, or better yet, dal mahkani.


You are truly wise.  Chickpeas are fine.  Not great, but not terrible.  Lentils are where is at.  Insanely cheap, versatile, healthy, and filling.  Plus, afterwards you have temporary vegetarian street cred.

(And by street cred, I mean epic crop dusting.)
 
2021-08-28 9:36:39 AM  
I just wanted some 3 bean salad. I got out the red, wax, and green beans and thought , what the heck, 4 beans are better than 3.  So I threw in a can of garbanzos. That just seemed like too much beans so I mixed it with a box of tricolor rotini. It needed something so I added red onion and scallions and looking through the cabinet canned sliced black olives and pimentos, some pepper rings and diced feta from the fridge Tossed it in some garlicy vinaigrette and had a refreshing summer snack that  lasted me a week or so.
 
2021-08-28 9:39:41 AM  

TheSubjunctive: millions of US households have got an Instant Pot or knockoff.


Yep. Dried chickpeas in the IP with water and a couple of bay leaves will cook in about an hour. They'll cook in mere minutes if you soak them, but if you're using a pressure cooker already, why bother?
 
2021-08-28 9:43:45 AM  

TwowheelinTim: cherryl taggart: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's love to, but one serving of canned anything is pretty-much my sodium allowance for the entire day.

Even after rinsing?  I've always thought the repeated rinsing got rid of the sodium.  Dang, I love rinsing a can of beans and dumping them in a salad.

Rinsing will get rid of much of the sodium; most of it seems to be in the liquid the beans are soaking in. It would be interesting to get a measurement on how much is left afterward.


I'm not a scientist, but wouldn't sodium be in equilibrium throughout the can? I mean, yeah, getting rid of the liquid gets rid of the sodium in the liquid, but there's still be sodium in the beans.
 
2021-08-28 9:58:08 AM  

phlegmjay: TwowheelinTim: cherryl taggart: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's love to, but one serving of canned anything is pretty-much my sodium allowance for the entire day.

Even after rinsing?  I've always thought the repeated rinsing got rid of the sodium.  Dang, I love rinsing a can of beans and dumping them in a salad.

Rinsing will get rid of much of the sodium; most of it seems to be in the liquid the beans are soaking in. It would be interesting to get a measurement on how much is left afterward.

I'm not a scientist, but wouldn't sodium be in equilibrium throughout the can? I mean, yeah, getting rid of the liquid gets rid of the sodium in the liquid, but there's still be sodium in the beans.


Yes there is. Beans are definitely not capable of reverse-osmosis. Common wisdom (and I think a couple of tests that were sent off for lab testing; I'm too lazy to hunt them down now) states that rinsing removes about 1/3 of the sodium. Basically just eliminates the brine on the surface of the beans, so it's pretty dependent on the surface area to volume ratio.
 
2021-08-28 10:03:56 AM  

TwowheelinTim: cherryl taggart: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's love to, but one serving of canned anything is pretty-much my sodium allowance for the entire day.

Even after rinsing?  I've always thought the repeated rinsing got rid of the sodium.  Dang, I love rinsing a can of beans and dumping them in a salad.

Rinsing will get rid of much of the sodium; most of it seems to be in the liquid the beans are soaking in. It would be interesting to get a measurement on how much is left afterward.


Yeah - I wish I knew how much sodium that gets rid of.  Because I loves me some canned beans for quick "Fark it I don't feel like cooking" days.
 
2021-08-28 10:35:05 AM  

phlegmjay: TwowheelinTim: cherryl taggart: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's love to, but one serving of canned anything is pretty-much my sodium allowance for the entire day.

Even after rinsing?  I've always thought the repeated rinsing got rid of the sodium.  Dang, I love rinsing a can of beans and dumping them in a salad.

Rinsing will get rid of much of the sodium; most of it seems to be in the liquid the beans are soaking in. It would be interesting to get a measurement on how much is left afterward.

I'm not a scientist, but wouldn't sodium be in equilibrium throughout the can? I mean, yeah, getting rid of the liquid gets rid of the sodium in the liquid, but there's still be sodium in the beans.


The sodium shouldn't be in equilibrium. That's the deal with osmosis. Cells have a semi-permeable membrane and the salt can't get through. Salt via electrical attraction only causes water to go one way or the other. The salt never entered the cells when added
ugc.futurelearn.comView Full Size
 
2021-08-28 10:40:35 AM  

olrasputin: Beans are definitely not capable of reverse-osmosis.


Silly question  perhaps, but why not?
If the salt leached in, why can't it leach out? (not all obviously, that would take a long time and many water changes)
Either the skin is permeable or it is not. *shrug*
 
2021-08-28 10:48:43 AM  

odinsposse: The real debate should be canned chickpeas vs chickpea flour. You can soak chickpea flour but for most applications you don't need to do it very long. Then you can make stuff like socca, pakora, and extremely smooth hummus.


Interesting...I had not considered using powder for houmous. I suppose it would be easy for those without a food processor, and I like the idea of not having to deal with sketchy tins with BPA-like linings.
 
2021-08-28 10:57:52 AM  

Percise1: olrasputin: Beans are definitely not capable of reverse-osmosis.

Silly question  perhaps, but why not?
If the salt leached in, why can't it leach out? (not all obviously, that would take a long time and many water changes)
Either the skin is permeable or it is not. *shrug*


That's my point. Beans are permeable to salt, and absorb it through regular osmosis, even in pressure cookers. They don't filter out just the solvent, i.e. pure water, when submerged in brine. Otherwise you could build a bean-based desalination plant, which would be...both interesting and hilarious, I suppose.

I would assume that the long-term equilibrium situation for canned beans would be for the entirety of the water in the can and individual beans  to reach the same salinity.
 
2021-08-28 11:11:59 AM  

Percise1: olrasputin: Beans are definitely not capable of reverse-osmosis.

Silly question  perhaps, but why not?
If the salt leached in, why can't it leach out? (not all obviously, that would take a long time and many water changes)
Either the skin is permeable or it is not. *shrug*


And I think, upon re-reading your comment, that I failed to address your sticking point.

The spreading out of a molecule in solution from regions of high concentration to regions of low concentration is called osmosis, regardless of the direction it's moving in with respect to a fixed side of the membrane.

For example, putting plain beans in brine will both raise the salt concentration in the beans and slightly dilute (depending on total volume) the salt concentration of the brine.

On the flip side, putting brined beans in pure water will both decrease the salt content of the beans and slightly increase the salinity of the pure water.

Under no condition does placing beans in brine produce an equilibrium resulting in saltless beans. This is because, as you said, beans are permeable to NaCl.
 
2021-08-28 11:20:22 AM  

olrasputin: Percise1: olrasputin: Beans are definitely not capable of reverse-osmosis.

Silly question  perhaps, but why not?
If the salt leached in, why can't it leach out? (not all obviously, that would take a long time and many water changes)
Either the skin is permeable or it is not. *shrug*

And I think, upon re-reading your comment, that I failed to address your sticking point.

The spreading out of a molecule in solution from regions of high concentration to regions of low concentration is called osmosis, regardless of the direction it's moving in with respect to a fixed side of the membrane.

For example, putting plain beans in brine will both raise the salt concentration in the beans and slightly dilute (depending on total volume) the salt concentration of the brine.

On the flip side, putting brined beans in pure water will both decrease the salt content of the beans and slightly increase the salinity of the pure water.

Under no condition does placing beans in brine produce an equilibrium resulting in saltless beans. This is because, as you said, beans are permeable to NaCl.


Osmosis does not move salt. That's not how this works. That's not how any of this works. Osmosis only moves water, not NaCl.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-08-28 11:21:44 AM  

olrasputin: Percise1: olrasputin: Beans are definitely not capable of reverse-osmosis.

Silly question  perhaps, but why not?
If the salt leached in, why can't it leach out? (not all obviously, that would take a long time and many water changes)
Either the skin is permeable or it is not. *shrug*

And I think, upon re-reading your comment, that I failed to address your sticking point.

The spreading out of a molecule in solution from regions of high concentration to regions of low concentration is called osmosis, regardless of the direction it's moving in with respect to a fixed side of the membrane.

For example, putting plain beans in brine will both raise the salt concentration in the beans and slightly dilute (depending on total volume) the salt concentration of the brine.

On the flip side, putting brined beans in pure water will both decrease the salt content of the beans and slightly increase the salinity of the pure water.

Under no condition does placing beans in brine produce an equilibrium resulting in saltless beans. This is because, as you said, beans are permeable to NaCl.


You confusing osmosis with diffusion. It is diffusion that has a substance in solution going from high to low. In osmosis, it is the water and not the substance in solution that is transferring through cell walls to even out concentrations. The salt is not passing through cell walls. Salt may be diffusing into the bean because the bean is not a cell, but it is not osmosis. It is transferring with the  water amongst the cell as part of dissusion.

In the case of beans, the sodum in salt will also replace other elements in the skin, changing their characteristics in cooking and other physical properties.
 
2021-08-28 11:39:17 AM  
fasahd:

McGrits:


Yeah, definitely meant to say diffusion in all that. Still working on coffee, and it's been a good decade since I had to think about that shiat.

And yeah, the replacement of calcium with sodium in the pectin certainly helps in an overnight soak and early on in cooking, but it seems pretty clear that brine is diffusing throughout each bean the longer they cook and the more the internal structure breaks down.

Replacement in skin alone seems to only raise the sodium content by a small amount. Dunno if you've ever rinsed and tasted an uncooked, brine-soaked dry bean, but it's pretty farking bland still.
 
2021-08-28 12:15:01 PM  
FTA: Personally, I love mine sauteed for 15 to 20 minutes on the stovetop in a drizzle of olive oil on a medium heat, topped with Himalayan pink salt, pepper, dried rosemary, thyme, and crushed red pepper flakes.

So... plain?
 
2021-08-28 12:16:45 PM  

fasahd: phlegmjay: TwowheelinTim: cherryl taggart: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's love to, but one serving of canned anything is pretty-much my sodium allowance for the entire day.

Even after rinsing?  I've always thought the repeated rinsing got rid of the sodium.  Dang, I love rinsing a can of beans and dumping them in a salad.

Rinsing will get rid of much of the sodium; most of it seems to be in the liquid the beans are soaking in. It would be interesting to get a measurement on how much is left afterward.

I'm not a scientist, but wouldn't sodium be in equilibrium throughout the can? I mean, yeah, getting rid of the liquid gets rid of the sodium in the liquid, but there's still be sodium in the beans.

The sodium shouldn't be in equilibrium. That's the deal with osmosis. Cells have a semi-permeable membrane and the salt can't get through. Salt via electrical attraction only causes water to go one way or the other. The salt never entered the cells when added
[ugc.futurelearn.com image 638x390]


Wouldn't that depend on how long the legumes had been soaking in the saline solution?  A solution will seek equilibrium, even through a semi-permeable membrane.  It just takes longer to get there because of the obstructions, but eventually it will.  Otherwise, curing meats and brining for preservation would not be a thing.  If the sodium content in the food didn't rise, you would still have microbial grown inside the food.
 
2021-08-28 12:33:12 PM  

ImOscar: Contrary to what the article says, raw chickpeas do not have to be soaked overnight; almost all other beans I soak but not chickpeas. You can cook one pound of raw chickpeas in just over four hours in a crock pot on high. 7.5 cups of water and ¼ teaspoon baking soda is all you need, stirring every hour or so. There's nothing wrong with canned chickpeas but using the crock pot method requires no soaking and delivers a garbanzo streets ahead of canned.


I've found I don't have to soak black or pinto beans before cooking. I have great results without doing so. I can't speak to other beans because black and pinto are all I cook.
 
2021-08-28 12:33:16 PM  

bigbadideasinaction: FTA: Personally, I love mine sauteed for 15 to 20 minutes on the stovetop in a drizzle of olive oil on a medium heat, topped with Himalayan pink salt, pepper, dried rosemary, thyme, and crushed red pepper flakes.

So... plain?


I guess you could call that plain if you ignore all of the seasonings.
 
2021-08-28 12:51:42 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: fasahd: 
The sodium shouldn't be in equilibrium. That's the deal with osmosis. Cells have a semi-permeable membrane and the salt can't get through. Salt via electrical attraction only causes water to go one way or the other. The salt never entered the cells when added
[ugc.futurelearn.com image 638x390]

Wouldn't that depend on how long the legumes had been soaking in the saline solution?  A solution will seek equilibrium, even through a semi-permeable membrane.  It just takes longer to get there because of the obstructions, but eventually it will.  Otherwise, curing meats and brining for preservation would not be a thing.  If the sodium content in the food didn't rise, you would still have microbial grown inside the food.


My speculation is that intracellular space will gain saline concentration over time or if pressure cooked, cell walls may be burst to allow saline to enter. I don't think the scientific rules of osmosis change by giving it more time. Microbes need water, osmosis draws the moisture out of cells making them inhospitable.
 
2021-08-28 1:33:06 PM  

TwowheelinTim: Meh, I prefer garbanzo beans myself.


Hi know the diffetence between them?
Trump never had a garbanzo bean on his head.
 
2021-08-28 1:37:21 PM  

Shaggy_C: odinsposse: The real debate should be canned chickpeas vs chickpea flour. You can soak chickpea flour but for most applications you don't need to do it very long. Then you can make stuff like socca, pakora, and extremely smooth hummus.

Interesting...I had not considered using powder for houmous. I suppose it would be easy for those without a food processor, and I like the idea of not having to deal with sketchy tins with BPA-like linings.


It explains the silky smooth texture of store bought hummus. No matter how much skin I removed I never got that texture right.
I think I' ll be making roasted red pepper hummus tout de suite.
 
2021-08-28 1:51:37 PM  

Tyrone Slothrop: Porous Horace: Oh yeah, baking soda in the soak water reduces soak time and supposedly takes out some of the fartiness.

It also helps remove the skins.


the skins are what cause the fartiness, my mom, a hummus expert, told me.
 
2021-08-28 2:53:23 PM  
Canned beans are one of the few "luxuries" I will always opt for. They're always ready to go. I don't have to plan 4-24 hours in advance, they're still pretty cheap, and I don't have a crock pot or a pressure cooker. I crack open a can and I got what I need.
 
2021-08-28 2:57:48 PM  

olrasputin: Percise1: olrasputin: Beans are definitely not capable of reverse-osmosis.

Silly question  perhaps, but why not?
If the salt leached in, why can't it leach out? (not all obviously, that would take a long time and many water changes)
Either the skin is permeable or it is not. *shrug*

And I think, upon re-reading your comment, that I failed to address your sticking point.

The spreading out of a molecule in solution from regions of high concentration to regions of low concentration is called osmosis, regardless of the direction it's moving in with respect to a fixed side of the membrane.

For example, putting plain beans in brine will both raise the salt concentration in the beans and slightly dilute (depending on total volume) the salt concentration of the brine.

On the flip side, putting brined beans in pure water will both decrease the salt content of the beans and slightly increase the salinity of the pure water.

Under no condition does placing beans in brine produce an equilibrium resulting in saltless beans. This is because, as you said, beans are permeable to NaCl.


Yes, I understand diffusion and osmosis... my pre-coffee brain didn't phrase things correctly.
I should have said "If the beans absorb salt from the brine solution they are canned in, one would expect them to release most of that salt if they are placed in fresh water; ie diffusion.

Anyway, I usually just use canned chickpeas when I'm putting them in a dish. I'm not opposed to soaking beans/peas and do so at times, but it mostly depends on how well I planned ahead.
Sometimes you just need some legumes now. Same goes with kidney beans for me... *shrug*
 
2021-08-28 3:39:06 PM  

Joey Jo Jo Jr Shabadu: bigbadideasinaction: FTA: Personally, I love mine sauteed for 15 to 20 minutes on the stovetop in a drizzle of olive oil on a medium heat, topped with Himalayan pink salt, pepper, dried rosemary, thyme, and crushed red pepper flakes.

So... plain?

I guess you could call that plain if you ignore all of the seasonings.


That's what you to do food before you start cooking it into a meal.
 
2021-08-28 4:50:25 PM  

ImOscar: Contrary to what the article says, raw chickpeas do not have to be soaked overnight; almost all other beans I soak but not chickpeas. You can cook one pound of raw chickpeas in just over four hours in a crock pot on high. 7.5 cups of water and ¼ teaspoon baking soda is all you need, stirring every hour or so. There's nothing wrong with canned chickpeas but using the crock pot method requires no soaking and delivers a garbanzo streets ahead of canned.


Yeah, not my experience.  Even with an overnight soak I find four hours is minimum.  I haven't tried it with a pressure cooker yet.
 
2021-08-28 5:34:11 PM  
i kid you not: Weight Watchers has a Brownie recipe using chikpeas that is the most moist delicious brownies you will ever stuff in your gaping maw. look it up. try it. it is freaking fantastic. PS: weight watchers cookbooks can be had for $2 in thrift shops. money well spent, my friends.
 
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