Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Science Alert)   Some of us are evolving. A new artery to supply our masturbation muscles   (sciencealert.com) divider line
    More: Amusing, Blood, Blood vessel, Carpal tunnel syndrome, Artery, 20th century, Wrist, Carpal tunnel, Vein  
•       •       •

972 clicks; posted to STEM » on 26 Aug 2021 at 2:50 AM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



24 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-08-25 11:57:24 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-08-26 2:59:58 AM  
And then some still have the Other third one, that runs up toward the thumb.  I wonder if that means some have all 4?  That'd be crazy.
 
2021-08-26 3:03:17 AM  
The donors raged from 51 to 101 on passing, which means they were nearly all born in the first half of the 20th century.

Impressed they managed to find 80 people that not only lived to 101, but that were able to rage for 50 years straight. Maybe that's the secret to longevity, pure, unbridled anger.
 
2021-08-26 3:31:24 AM  
That artery is like:
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size
 
2021-08-26 3:47:40 AM  

dyhchong: The donors raged from 51 to 101 on passing, which means they were nearly all born in the first half of the 20th century.
Impressed they managed to find 80 people that not only lived to 101, but that were able to rage for 50 years straight. Maybe that's the secret to longevity, pure, unbridled anger.


I'm working on it, but why the fark would I want to live a long farking life under the circumstances?

Since the 18th century, anatomists have been studying the prevalence of this artery in adults and our study shows it's clearly increasing," Flinders University anatomist Teghan Lucas said in 2020.
"The prevalence was around 10 percent in people born in the mid-1880s compared to 30 percent in those born in the late 20th century, so that's a significant increase in a fairly short period of time, when it comes to evolution."


You know what else had a significant increase in the late 20th century?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-08-26 4:22:39 AM  
With helpful pic of a forearm
 
2021-08-26 4:55:47 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

Fark user image

What kind of garbage is this? This makes no sense at all. Something may be going on, but it's not from natural section due to a fitness advantage from an extra forearm artery.
 
2021-08-26 5:10:11 AM  

SanityIsAFullTimeJob: [Fark user image 425x149]
[Fark user image 425x96]

What kind of garbage is this? This makes no sense at all. Something may be going on, but it's not from natural section due to a fitness advantage from an extra forearm artery.


People who give more vigorous handjobs get more chances to reproduce.
 
2021-08-26 5:17:25 AM  

dyhchong: SanityIsAFullTimeJob: [Fark user image 425x149]
[Fark user image 425x96]

What kind of garbage is this? This makes no sense at all. Something may be going on, but it's not from natural section due to a fitness advantage from an extra forearm artery.

People who give more vigorous handjobs get more chances to reproduce.


And people who rub one out more vigorously produce more active sperm

/it's science
 
2021-08-26 5:40:29 AM  
The human body will alter itself to changing demands placed on it. Do a lot of one thing and the body will adjust, like how tennis players have larger bones in their dominant arm.
 
2021-08-26 5:54:54 AM  

SanityIsAFullTimeJob: [Fark user image 425x149]
[Fark user image 425x96]

What kind of garbage is this? This makes no sense at all. Something may be going on, but it's not from natural section due to a fitness advantage from an extra forearm artery.


Depends on what it helps with.  I'm guessing that it would permit longer periods of fine complex manual dexterity.

The most dexterous thing that the majority of people a few hundred years ago had to do regularly was swing an axe, or a scythe, or a hammer.  Some large heavy tool that you just have to have a good grip on, similar to, say, gripping a branch in our more ancient ancestors.  Grip strength is controlled by two large muscles that sit along the radius and ulna and are directly fed by radial and ulnar arteries, for obvious reasons.

I guess sewing and stuff too.  I wonder if it's more prevalent in women.

For the past couple hundred years, with the rise of large scale education, people have increasingly been expected to read and write, and the ease which they can do that with has factored directly into their fitness, both towards their likelihood to be successful and their likelihood to die early.  Writing (along with all sorts of fine motor skills that are far more common today) requires fine coordination of a bunch of small muscles in both the wrist and hand, but these muscles mostly get their blood from offshoots off the main arteries.  So, having another artery that more directly supplies these muscles could be advantageous for longer periods of complex work.
 
2021-08-26 6:09:33 AM  

LrdPhoenix: SanityIsAFullTimeJob: [Fark user image 425x149]
[Fark user image 425x96]

What kind of garbage is this? This makes no sense at all. Something may be going on, but it's not from natural section due to a fitness advantage from an extra forearm artery.

Depends on what it helps with.  I'm guessing that it would permit longer periods of fine complex manual dexterity.

The most dexterous thing that the majority of people a few hundred years ago had to do regularly was swing an axe, or a scythe, or a hammer.  Some large heavy tool that you just have to have a good grip on, similar to, say, gripping a branch in our more ancient ancestors.  Grip strength is controlled by two large muscles that sit along the radius and ulna and are directly fed by radial and ulnar arteries, for obvious reasons.

I guess sewing and stuff too.  I wonder if it's more prevalent in women.

For the past couple hundred years, with the rise of large scale education, people have increasingly been expected to read and write, and the ease which they can do that with has factored directly into their fitness, both towards their likelihood to be successful and their likelihood to die early.  Writing (along with all sorts of fine motor skills that are far more common today) requires fine coordination of a bunch of small muscles in both the wrist and hand, but these muscles mostly get their blood from offshoots off the main arteries.  So, having another artery that more directly supplies these muscles could be advantageous for longer periods of complex work.


No, this is still all wrong.

Let's say it is materially adaptive to modern work. But these days, the ability to work isn't really correlated to the ability to procreate and keep your offspring alive. If you have kids, the government will keep your kids alive. The people who are most successful in their jobs I'm western culture are least likely to even have kids.

There's absolutely no way the ability to type minimally better (which probably isn't the case) is such a fitness advantage that the people without this trait are replaced in a couple hundred years.
 
2021-08-26 6:11:14 AM  
Arterial freaks... I'm looking!
 
2021-08-26 6:32:38 AM  

johnny_vegas: dyhchong: SanityIsAFullTimeJob: [Fark user image 425x149]
[Fark user image 425x96]

What kind of garbage is this? This makes no sense at all. Something may be going on, but it's not from natural section due to a fitness advantage from an extra forearm artery.

People who give more vigorous handjobs get more chances to reproduce.

And people who rub one out more vigorously produce more active sperm

/it's science


Whaddya doing in the bathroom for so damn long? Evolving?
 
2021-08-26 6:45:42 AM  

SanityIsAFullTimeJob: LrdPhoenix: SanityIsAFullTimeJob: [Fark user image 425x149]
[Fark user image 425x96]

What kind of garbage is this? This makes no sense at all. Something may be going on, but it's not from natural section due to a fitness advantage from an extra forearm artery.

Depends on what it helps with.  I'm guessing that it would permit longer periods of fine complex manual dexterity.

The most dexterous thing that the majority of people a few hundred years ago had to do regularly was swing an axe, or a scythe, or a hammer.  Some large heavy tool that you just have to have a good grip on, similar to, say, gripping a branch in our more ancient ancestors.  Grip strength is controlled by two large muscles that sit along the radius and ulna and are directly fed by radial and ulnar arteries, for obvious reasons.

I guess sewing and stuff too.  I wonder if it's more prevalent in women.

For the past couple hundred years, with the rise of large scale education, people have increasingly been expected to read and write, and the ease which they can do that with has factored directly into their fitness, both towards their likelihood to be successful and their likelihood to die early.  Writing (along with all sorts of fine motor skills that are far more common today) requires fine coordination of a bunch of small muscles in both the wrist and hand, but these muscles mostly get their blood from offshoots off the main arteries.  So, having another artery that more directly supplies these muscles could be advantageous for longer periods of complex work.


No, this is still all wrong.

Let's say it is materially adaptive to modern work. But these days, the ability to work isn't really correlated to the ability to procreate and keep your offspring alive. If you have kids, the government will keep your kids alive. The people who are most successful in their jobs I'm western culture are least likely to even have kids.

There's absolutely no way the ability to type minimally better (which probab ...


The other data sets referenced in the paper are all over the place, and they all seem to have small sample sizes.  I don't care what their regression spat out, I'm not buying it without larger, regular samples and an identified genetic locus for selection (shouldn't be hard to find if it's actually strong selection!).

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-08-26 6:53:28 AM  

Tom Marvolo Bombadil: SanityIsAFullTimeJob: LrdPhoenix: SanityIsAFullTimeJob: [Fark user image 425x149]
[Fark user image 425x96]

What kind of garbage is this? This makes no sense at all. Something may be going on, but it's not from natural section due to a fitness advantage from an extra forearm artery.

Depends on what it helps with.  I'm guessing that it would permit longer periods of fine complex manual dexterity.

The most dexterous thing that the majority of people a few hundred years ago had to do regularly was swing an axe, or a scythe, or a hammer.  Some large heavy tool that you just have to have a good grip on, similar to, say, gripping a branch in our more ancient ancestors.  Grip strength is controlled by two large muscles that sit along the radius and ulna and are directly fed by radial and ulnar arteries, for obvious reasons.

I guess sewing and stuff too.  I wonder if it's more prevalent in women.

For the past couple hundred years, with the rise of large scale education, people have increasingly been expected to read and write, and the ease which they can do that with has factored directly into their fitness, both towards their likelihood to be successful and their likelihood to die early.  Writing (along with all sorts of fine motor skills that are far more common today) requires fine coordination of a bunch of small muscles in both the wrist and hand, but these muscles mostly get their blood from offshoots off the main arteries.  So, having another artery that more directly supplies these muscles could be advantageous for longer periods of complex work.


No, this is still all wrong.

Let's say it is materially adaptive to modern work. But these days, the ability to work isn't really correlated to the ability to procreate and keep your offspring alive. If you have kids, the government will keep your kids alive. The people who are most successful in their jobs I'm western culture are least likely to even have kids.

There's absolutely no way the ability to type minimally better (which probab ...

The other data sets referenced in the paper are all over the place, and they all seem to have small sample sizes.  I don't care what their regression spat out, I'm not buying it without larger, regular samples and an identified genetic locus for selection (shouldn't be hard to find if it's actually strong selection!).

[Fark user image image 581x308]


One thing I'd ask - were the same genetic populations sampled? Was it all white Europeans sampled back in the day and how does that compare to the current sample?

There could also be environmental differences. Maybe prenatal nutritional changes for example.
 
2021-08-26 7:59:52 AM  
I think i read something about this a while back. Aren't these particular arteries present in everyone during gestation to provide greater blood flow during early development, then supposed to disappear after a certain point? I think the piece I read theorized that there's an environmental or possibly chemical effect that could cause it to remain more frequently now but there's nothing concrete yet. Also it's a little difficult to search for anything related to very specific soft tissues in any samples more that about 50 years post mortem so it'll probably be a while before any trends are noticed in regard to this extra artery business.
 
2021-08-26 9:37:59 AM  
More accurate title:

'More of us are retaining a developmental artery.'

Hard to determine and evolutionary advantage here either way.
 
2021-08-26 10:15:51 AM  

Befuddled: The human body will alter itself to changing demands placed on it. Do a lot of one thing and the body will adjust, like how tennis players have larger bones in their dominant arm.


And farkers have larger bones in their trousers
 
2021-08-26 10:16:52 AM  

born_yesterday: johnny_vegas: dyhchong: SanityIsAFullTimeJob: [Fark user image 425x149]
[Fark user image 425x96]

What kind of garbage is this? This makes no sense at all. Something may be going on, but it's not from natural section due to a fitness advantage from an extra forearm artery.

People who give more vigorous handjobs get more chances to reproduce.

And people who rub one out more vigorously produce more active sperm

/it's science

Whaddya doing in the bathroom for so damn long? Evolving?


Just putting up wallpaper, mom.
 
2021-08-26 10:42:11 AM  
Degenerate mutant filth.
 
2021-08-26 12:32:57 PM  

SanityIsAFullTimeJob: No, this is still all wrong.
Let's say it is materially adaptive to modern work. But these days, the ability to work isn't really correlated to the ability to procreate and keep your offspring alive. If you have kids, the government will keep your kids alive. The people who are most successful in their jobs I'm western culture are least likely to even have kids.
There's absolutely no way the ability to type minimally better (which probably isn't the case) is such a fitness advantage that the people without this trait are replaced in a couple hundred years.


Why not? Everyone in the country evolved to be fat in about 30 years. You can ask them.
 
2021-08-26 2:03:15 PM  

gnosis301: Degenerate mutant filth.


img-comment-fun.9cache.comView Full Size
 
2021-08-26 5:46:35 PM  

SanityIsAFullTimeJob: One thing I'd ask - were the same genetic populations sampled? Was it all white Europeans sampled back in the day and how does that compare to the current sample?

There could also be environmental differences. Maybe prenatal nutritional changes for example.


That was one of my first thoughts as well, though I assume they'd have addressed it in their analysis.  Didn't read enough of the paper to check.
 
Displayed 24 of 24 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.