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(CNBC)   China's latest covid lockdown could have economic costs to the world, says economic strategist who also believes in buying low and selling high   (cnbc.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, China, People's Republic of China, Economics, Economic growth, Economy of the People's Republic of China, country's economic growth, Kuomintang, Chinese stocks  
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485 clicks; posted to Business » on 10 Aug 2021 at 2:10 PM (16 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



9 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-08-10 2:31:29 PM  
Good thing I already have a house full of... Well-made, not-Chinese stuff
 
2021-08-10 2:46:51 PM  
No, dude. You gotta buy high, and sell high.
That way, nobody can tell that you're high.
Trust me on this one.
 
2021-08-10 2:53:38 PM  
We really need to get more factories going here-- highly efficient, lower pollution, etc. I love retail. The best most fulfilling jobs I had were in specialty retail management. But now I drive a truck and I feel kind of guilty about leaving the truck driving world in a few months because we are so short-staffed, but a BMI of 52 ain't gonna fix itself. Industry is far more important than retail, more important than fast food (except in truck stops, many drivers don't have fridges to keep fresh food in anyway).

"Getting back to work" is not enough. We need to target what we go back to and open more opportunities for decreasing our reliance on China. Yes it's more expensive.
 
2021-08-10 4:04:10 PM  

BolloxReader: We really need to get more factories going here-- highly efficient, lower pollution, etc. I love retail. The best most fulfilling jobs I had were in specialty retail management. But now I drive a truck and I feel kind of guilty about leaving the truck driving world in a few months because we are so short-staffed, but a BMI of 52 ain't gonna fix itself. Industry is far more important than retail, more important than fast food (except in truck stops, many drivers don't have fridges to keep fresh food in anyway).

"Getting back to work" is not enough. We need to target what we go back to and open more opportunities for decreasing our reliance on China. Yes it's more expensive.


I work in a BIG factory.  We can't get good people to work here now and we pay well and have good benefits.  Factories suck. They will always suck. 20-40 years ago young people tinkered around on cars or had dads that came back from WWII or Vietnam and had garages or at least taught their kids some mechanical motor skills.  You almost had to learn those thing back then because there wasnt jack to do otherwise.  Now, most have never touched a tool. And while many are savvy with computer games and the like, using a program in say a CNC machine may as well be like teaching an orangutan how to land the space shuttle. The more detailed you write the instructions, the more they zone out. The more autonomy you give, the more stuff gets messed up.  You can train 10, maybe 3 make it a year. Building a bench for backup is almost impossible.

Also, for every drunk or hard to deal with "blue collar" person on the line, years back you could reliably have 3 or 4 guys there with families they cared about their job or took pride in things. Now it's the opposite.  Almost all of these guys could give a flying fark about their kids or whoever is the mother of their kid...and the second they are off the line, they are drinking or humping their guns.  And while I don't care about weed so much, the population of potential blue collar workers self medicating with the wrong treatment is almost 100%. Maybe that has always been the case.

The mental illness of Oppositional Defiant Disorder is a scorge as well.  It has always been around. That meme with the guy telling the teacher that he only needs U-S-A is over a decade old now.  But now it is engrained into kids at a young age and pervasive in at least 50% of the population.  It used to be that you could hire ex military guys because that was drilled out of them, but the military guys now are the ring leaders for whatever silly protest they want to have to slow things down.

I used to visit factories on a weekly basis...most are great examples of dehumanizing and torture.  The big big companies do ok because they have years of SOP's written and redundancies. But the smaller ones that are more local or regional, many are run by Trumpers or have a heavy evangelical presence and are not pleasant places to visit much less work.

I went on a date with a lobbiest for the National Association of Manufacturers.  I drilled her with questions for hours.  They have no real agenda or end goal. They work on a 2-3 year plan and will go guardrail to guardrail on policy depending on the administration.  It's a mostly republican shlushfund.  She scrapped everything she was doing for Trump and now started backing a very scaled back version of the infrastructure bill. The cognitive dissonance of her discussing FoxConn in Wisconsin was a great part of the date.
 
2021-08-10 4:37:22 PM  
The death of the American factory is greatly exaggerated.  In fact, ignoring economic downturns, the inflation adjusted amount of American factory production has always increased.  The US is #2 in the world in total factory production (behind China, but in front of the other 200ish countries on Earth).

That being said, a whole heck of a lot of American factory workers have been replaced by robots and other automation.  A factory that once needed 100 employees to make a thousand widgets a day now has 100 robots (with 10 employees to babysit and program them) to make the same thousand widgets daily.
 
2021-08-10 4:40:44 PM  
We have factories in Ohio, TN, Alabama and Mississippi.  Only the TN one has good AC, the rest are sweat boxes.  I feel bad when I visit them and really felt bad last week when I had to work on the floor a lot.  It's hot, dirty work for not much more money than fast food or cashier.  At least those have AC that is effective.

No surprise that we struggle to find workers.  At least management has improved the culture.  They've lost so many employees that they have to.  Losing not only hourly, but salary workers too.  Engineers bailing out like a Russian parachute team. Might lose me in October or so.  Easy job with a good boss, but the pay is on the low side for the role.
 
2021-08-10 4:48:52 PM  

badplaid: BolloxReader: We really need to get more factories going here-- highly efficient, lower pollution, etc. I love retail. The best most fulfilling jobs I had were in specialty retail management. But now I drive a truck and I feel kind of guilty about leaving the truck driving world in a few months because we are so short-staffed, but a BMI of 52 ain't gonna fix itself. Industry is far more important than retail, more important than fast food (except in truck stops, many drivers don't have fridges to keep fresh food in anyway).

"Getting back to work" is not enough. We need to target what we go back to and open more opportunities for decreasing our reliance on China. Yes it's more expensive.

I work in a BIG factory.  We can't get good people to work here now and we pay well and have good benefits.  Factories suck. They will always suck. 20-40 years ago young people tinkered around on cars or had dads that came back from WWII or Vietnam and had garages or at least taught their kids some mechanical motor skills.  You almost had to learn those thing back then because there wasnt jack to do otherwise.  Now, most have never touched a tool. And while many are savvy with computer games and the like, using a program in say a CNC machine may as well be like teaching an orangutan how to land the space shuttle. The more detailed you write the instructions, the more they zone out. The more autonomy you give, the more stuff gets messed up.  You can train 10, maybe 3 make it a year. Building a bench for backup is almost impossible.

Also, for every drunk or hard to deal with "blue collar" person on the line, years back you could reliably have 3 or 4 guys there with families they cared about their job or took pride in things. Now it's the opposite.  Almost all of these guys could give a flying fark about their kids or whoever is the mother of their kid...and the second they are off the line, they are drinking or humping their guns.  And while I don't care about weed so much, the popu ...


I worked for a manufacturing company.  Most were in Rural locations.  We had one location in Bum Fark Missouri.  Others were in Wi, Az and SC, with 2 overseas plants.  In the early 00's it was $15/ hr to start, full benefits, free soda/ gatorade and free meals at work .   The next town over had a WalMart where you could make $9.   It was automated manufacturing.   So we need floor monkeys.  If a alarm goes off, hit the big red button and find someone to look at it.   The requirements for the job were, no drugs (piss clean), show up to work more/less on time, HS diploma or GED.

Same thing.  They would hire 10 guys and within a month or 2 they were down to 3.   Mind you, they were all told.  If you work out, and we like you, we will train you to be a machinist or an electrician.  Those guys made between $70/k - $110k/ yr and could travel all over the world to the other plants.  To be fair it was hot, I mean HOT, loud and boring most of the time.
 
2021-08-10 4:51:57 PM  
This buying low and selling high stuff has created untold numbers of millionaires and billionaires on wall street. This is the number one way for the 1% to rob us blind.
 
2021-08-10 8:26:02 PM  

badplaid: They work on a 2-3 year plan and will go guardrail to guardrail on policy depending on the administration.


Middle men don't want to be eliminated, so it's in their interest to keep the plates spinning. It's one series of disasters to the next at the ground floor and it sucks to be a part of it. Publicly-traded companies are terrible, and it's just the worst when you can objectively witness them being bad at their job in real time. No one knows what's going on but what is directly in front of them. At the end of the day the clock's ticking and we got numbers to meet. So we all keep busy playing our part keeping the machines running so the lights stay on and bread in our bellies.

Easy credit and bad fiscal habits can trap you into a grave not far away from these places. Getting run over by forklift or getting caught into a machine and turned into paste within seconds are constant hazards. The air was poisonous, too. It's a fearsome machine to be inside, toxic to health and sanity.
 
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