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(Guardian)   The UK wants to run fiber optic internet through a series of tubes   (theguardian.com) divider line
    More: PSA, Plumbing, Drinking water, Water supply network, Drinking Water Inspectorate, Desalination, Water crisis, water pipes, optic broadband cables  
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578 clicks; posted to STEM » on 09 Aug 2021 at 2:05 AM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



18 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-08-08 9:59:53 PM  
That would go....pooh

There's this liner they can blow into pipes and then it gets heated and hardens. It's used to fix crumbling old mains. If you could integrate fiber into that, even as a cable then I will die poor because that's a million dollar idea I just gave away.
 
2021-08-08 10:07:11 PM  

cretinbob: That would go....pooh

There's this liner they can blow into pipes and then it gets heated and hardens. It's used to fix crumbling old mains. If you could integrate fiber into that, even as a cable then I will die poor because that's a million dollar idea I just gave away.


Google already went with the flow.
 
2021-08-08 11:41:41 PM  

null: cretinbob: That would go....pooh

There's this liner they can blow into pipes and then it gets heated and hardens. It's used to fix crumbling old mains. If you could integrate fiber into that, even as a cable then I will die poor because that's a million dollar idea I just gave away.

Google already went with the flow.


Well, I was going to die poor anyway.

// there are no original ideas
 
2021-08-09 2:16:50 AM  
The internet is going to shiat anyway
 
2021-08-09 4:20:33 AM  
UK water, now with microplastic flavor!
 
2021-08-09 5:16:10 AM  
This sounds like a colossally bad idea. How in the world would you operate the water system? You can no longer close valves because they would crush the fiberoptic cables. And how would you replace the damaged piping with a cable running through it?
 
2021-08-09 5:17:05 AM  

Nosatril: This sounds like a colossally bad idea. How in the world would you operate the water system? You can no longer close valves because they would crush the fiberoptic cables. And how would you replace the damaged piping with a cable running through it?


Like the british are not used to having water everywhere already
 
2021-08-09 8:34:45 AM  
Sending signals through the water supply will push 5G nutters off the deep end.
 
2021-08-09 8:41:59 AM  
Fiber optic actually is a series of tubes. Light... sometimes it reflects instead of going through
 
2021-08-09 9:11:01 AM  

whither_apophis: The internet is going to shiat anyway


The immutable blockchain to the rescue.
 
2021-08-09 9:11:53 AM  

grokca: Sending signals through the water supply will push 5G nutters off the deep end.


Especially if they have to pee
 
2021-08-09 9:15:06 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-08-09 10:00:37 AM  

Nosatril: This sounds like a colossally bad idea. How in the world would you operate the water system? You can no longer close valves because they would crush the fiberoptic cables. And how would you replace the damaged piping with a cable running through it?


Take a look at the link in the second comment. If they go through drains, they have no valves.
 
2021-08-09 10:07:50 AM  
I have fiber optic internet and I live out in the country where houses are generally a city block apart. We're lucky to have a very progressive rural coop phone company.

My yard:
Fark user imageView Full Size


I'm under the blue dot as I type this. Left and right edges of the Google map capture and the area with trees is  my "yard". Haven't found any tubes unless you count the one that lets rainfall go under the road for the stream that makes the dark squiggle from edge to edge of the Google map screen capture.
 
2021-08-09 10:51:11 AM  
"About a fifth of water put into public supply every day". shiat, that's nothing. In Buffalo, NY, that number is 60%. More water is lost to leaks than actually DELIVERED to endpoints.
 
2021-08-09 11:04:58 AM  

cretinbob: Nosatril: This sounds like a colossally bad idea. How in the world would you operate the water system? You can no longer close valves because they would crush the fiberoptic cables. And how would you replace the damaged piping with a cable running through it?

Take a look at the link in the second comment. If they go through drains, they have no valves.


If they go through drains then they have to contend with plumbers snakes. The cable would help catch solids and grow biofilms, meaning more clogs. And if they use force mains then you would have to have a way to bypass the grinder pumps and survive line pigging, and those have valves as well.

The only way I see it as viable is if they are thinking of using decommissioned lines as conduits. Even that isn't without pitfalls, but at least it would be doable.
 
2021-08-09 11:36:46 AM  
It is much cheaper to run new fiber (opps fibre) at the telcom level which isn't very deep.  Sure some of it gets broken with roadworks but that is still cheaper in the long run than trying to mess with joining water pipes and fiber.

I expect Australia got the idea of running all the telcoms in conduit from the British. Most local people in the industry are astonished to know that a vast majority of US telcom wiring is just direct burial cable where the wire goes in the dirt.  Around here every underground phone line is in a plastic pipe a foot deep.  Most cable tv stuff in the US is put down with a lawn edger like trencher that puts it maybe 6 inches deep.  If it gets dug up, just run a new cable in a new trench and most of it will never have that problem.
 
2021-08-09 12:29:27 PM  

DON.MAC: It is much cheaper to run new fiber (opps fibre) at the telcom level which isn't very deep.  Sure some of it gets broken with roadworks but that is still cheaper in the long run than trying to mess with joining water pipes and fiber.

I expect Australia got the idea of running all the telcoms in conduit from the British. Most local people in the industry are astonished to know that a vast majority of US telcom wiring is just direct burial cable where the wire goes in the dirt.  Around here every underground phone line is in a plastic pipe a foot deep.  Most cable tv stuff in the US is put down with a lawn edger like trencher that puts it maybe 6 inches deep.  If it gets dug up, just run a new cable in a new trench and most of it will never have that problem.


This shorttermism leads to this

jayphat: "About a fifth of water put into public supply every day". shiat, that's nothing. In Buffalo, NY, that number is 60%. More water is lost to leaks than actually DELIVERED to endpoints.

 
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