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(CNN)   CNN reviews cast iron skillets and gets it...right? Which is your favorite?   (cnn.com) divider line
    More: Misc, Cast-iron cookware, Cookware and bakeware, Griswold pan, Frying pan, iron skillets, new cast-iron skillets, Lodge Chef Collection 12-Inch Skillet, heirloom pan  
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828 clicks; posted to Food » on 01 Aug 2021 at 10:30 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-08-01 7:59:03 AM  
Don't know about 'best', but my Lodge skillet is great - I stopped buying disposable non-stick skillets and just use that one.

Had to get rid of the Lodge pebbling myself though and re-season it.
 
2021-08-01 8:11:05 AM  
We stayed last week at a small house my in-laws have.  Most of the utensils and bakeware is from the 50s and I wasn't all that thrilled with it until I found the Lodge. The seasoning was kinda rough but after a few uses it got really good   Scrambled eggs? Done. Potato and ham hash?  Here you are! Pizza? Yum!
 
2021-08-01 8:19:11 AM  
Came to see Lodge at number one, and I wasn't disappointed. My husband swears by Lodge. It is the best.
 
2021-08-01 8:20:34 AM  
Griswold, about 16", from the turn of last century. It was my mother's and her mother's before.

I cook with it every day. Works just fine with vegetarian cooking -the need for bacon grease is a myth. I have to keep it oiled, but it doesn't rust.
 
2021-08-01 8:29:16 AM  
We manage to cook without skillets.  And we cook a lot. Big fans of the Maillard effect but now concerned by excessive acrylamide   production so the skillets are mothballed.
 
2021-08-01 8:40:19 AM  

Breaker Moran: We manage to cook without skillets.  And we cook a lot. Big fans of the Maillard effect but now concerned by excessive acrylamide   production so the skillets are mothballed.


That reminds me. I need to get some duck breasts. They're really fatty...but the best way to cook them is slowly at first skin side down to render a lot of fat out with a cast iron skillet. Then save the fat and finish them up in a oven in the same skillet.
But to me it's vital to brown them first in skillet because with duck you really want the mallard effect.
 
2021-08-01 8:48:34 AM  

optikeye: Breaker Moran: We manage to cook without skillets.  And we cook a lot. Big fans of the Maillard effect but now concerned by excessive acrylamide   production so the skillets are mothballed.

That reminds me. I need to get some duck breasts. They're really fatty...but the best way to cook them is slowly at first skin side down to render a lot of fat out with a cast iron skillet. Then save the fat and finish them up in a oven in the same skillet.
But to me it's vital to brown them first in skillet because with duck you really want the mallard effect.


Also Mallard effects:

Mallards are seasonally monogamous.

They also gang rape.

The males have corkscrew penises.

Bon appetit.
 
2021-08-01 8:50:22 AM  

optikeye: Breaker Moran: We manage to cook without skillets.  And we cook a lot. Big fans of the Maillard effect but now concerned by excessive acrylamide   production so the skillets are mothballed.

That reminds me. I need to get some duck breasts. They're really fatty...but the best way to cook them is slowly at first skin side down to render a lot of fat out with a cast iron skillet. Then save the fat and finish them up in a oven in the same skillet.
But to me it's vital to brown them first in skillet because with duck you really want the mallard effect.


Oh, look at you. Eating quackers like you own the place.
 
2021-08-01 8:52:09 AM  

yohohogreengiant: The males have corkscrew penises.


That would make a nice hors d'oeuvre plate with hummingbird tongues and badger noses.
 
2021-08-01 8:55:12 AM  
The 75-yr old one my Gammie left me
 
2021-08-01 9:05:04 AM  
My lodge is great, also have a couple I got from Costco which also do just fine.  I think the best thing to do is to re-season them as soon. As you buy them.  Put them the oven on self clean for an hour, clean them off then then start coating with flaxseed oil and bake, rinse and repeat several times.
 
2021-08-01 9:15:45 AM  

gopher321: Don't know about 'best', but my Lodge skillet is great


I have two of them (won them both at the National Cornbread Festival) and recommend them highly.
 
2021-08-01 9:26:43 AM  
the one that is at least 100 years old that went from grandma, to dad, to me.

took years to get the burnt fried taste off, she was a shiatty cook.
 
2021-08-01 9:44:29 AM  
Is it just me, or does anyone else find the 12 inch to be too big for the heating elements and you get uneven temps?

Or do I just need to leave it longer to come up to temp?
 
2021-08-01 10:02:21 AM  

Breaker Moran: We manage to cook without skillets.  And we cook a lot. Big fans of the Maillard effect but now concerned by excessive acrylamide   production so the skillets are mothballed.


No disrespect, but that sounds like not a good reason not to enjoy some good food in moderation. Dietary acrylamide is not related to the risk of most common cancers.: https://onlinelibrary.wiley​.com/doi/pd​f/10.1002/ijc.29339
 
2021-08-01 10:06:59 AM  
The best cast iron pans are the ones that you find at estate or garage sales that have been used for generations.

I currently have a Lodge pan but the best was an antique (I have absolutely no idea what brand it was)  that had been seasoned to the point that it was no-stick.  (I lost it in a move, which fills me with a deep sadness to this day.)
 
2021-08-01 10:41:03 AM  
The Wagnerware #8 I picked up at a garage sale for $5.
 
2021-08-01 10:45:52 AM  
One of my graduation gifts to Thing1 was a bunch of Lodge cookware including various skillets, lids, bread pans, pie plates, a Dutch oven, and a hibachi. He likes to cook and I wanted him to have something that will last forever. I use my grandmother's skillets from the Great Depression.
 
2021-08-01 10:51:32 AM  

Gubbo: Is it just me, or does anyone else find the 12 inch to be too big for the heating elements and you get uneven temps?

Or do I just need to leave it longer to come up to temp?


I put some fat in the skillet and bring it up on low for a few minutes before cooking. I get pretty even temps that way.
 
2021-08-01 10:59:59 AM  
Subby, and team Lodge here. The inexpensive set of Rachel Ray anodized pots, pans/skillets S.O. has are fine for what they are. But serious cooking, both indoors and out -- I'm all about cast iron.

After picking up a really old (circa 60's or 70's) Lodge grill pan from a garage sale for maybe 10$ -- I was sold. Camp dutch oven for campfire stew, as well as a deep rimmed pan for frying fish/chicken/etc. Smaller pan for eggs/bacon/etc.

A semi-deep dish pizza is amazing in cast iron. (Not starting a pizza war; just sayin')
 
2021-08-01 11:03:52 AM  

Notabunny: One of my graduation gifts to Thing1 was a bunch of Lodge cookware including various skillets, lids, bread pans, pie plates, a Dutch oven, and a hibachi. He likes to cook and I wanted him to have something that will last forever. I use my grandmother's skillets from the Great Depression.


That is awesome, and will last a lifetime or more. I couldn't think of a more practical and useful gift to give to someone than good cookware. I sure hope you showed/told Thing1 how to care for it. I had a roomie that tried to put my first cast iron grill (as referenced above) in the dishwasher, and I had a mild heart attack before he hit 'Start' on the load.
 
2021-08-01 11:04:57 AM  
For some applications you need more than 12 inches though

images.squarespace-cdn.comView Full Size
 
2021-08-01 11:22:22 AM  
Anyone tried the Lodge "chef's collection" mentioned in the article? Is it appreciably better than their regular line?
 
2021-08-01 11:22:56 AM  
The lodge stuff is decent, especially for its price range, but I kind of find the whole fascination with cast iron a bit overrated. Carbon steel pans are more versatile.

Disclaimer: my overrated claim does not include enameled dutch ovens. They're awesome.
 
2021-08-01 11:25:25 AM  
Don't have a skillet (glass top stove). I do have a Lodge griddle that I use on the grill.

Made breakfast this morning on the grill:
Hash brown patty, Glier's Goetta, Omelette.

Seems that I am the only one in my neighborhood that cooks breakfast on a grill? (yes I made pancakes and even french toast on that cast iron griddle on the grill).
One day I should get a skillet and try cooking with it on the grill...
 
2021-08-01 11:26:45 AM  

Gubbo: Is it just me, or does anyone else find the 12 inch to be too big for the heating elements and you get uneven temps?

Or do I just need to leave it longer to come up to temp?


I find the 10" skillet to be perfect for most tasks. It is definitely easier to get cornbread out of a 10" skillet. For bigger tasks I jump up to the big daddy 14" skillet. You will also want to get a 14" canning kettle, just for the lid. Big daddy is the American wok, you fry/brown in the hot spot in the center, and slide stuff to the edges to keep it hot. You can fry up some bacon in the hot spot, shove it the side, fry up some hash browns in the grease, shove the hash browns to the side, and then fry up some eggs, all in one pan. Perfect for fried rice, or breakfast skillets. The secret to perfect hash browns is half and half bacon grease and canola oil (to raise the smoke point), par-boiling, and oven frying them in the oven at 400F -425F in Big Daddy. Doubles as a pizza stone and roasting pan. Also great over a charcoal fire for even heat.
 
2021-08-01 11:38:15 AM  

Gubbo: Is it just me, or does anyone else find the 12 inch to be too big for the heating elements and you get uneven temps?

Or do I just need to leave it longer to come up to temp?


Propane it's God's gas Billy
 
2021-08-01 11:38:18 AM  

Psychopompous: Gubbo: Is it just me, or does anyone else find the 12 inch to be too big for the heating elements and you get uneven temps?

Or do I just need to leave it longer to come up to temp?

I find the 10" skillet to be perfect for most tasks. It is definitely easier to get cornbread out of a 10" skillet. For bigger tasks I jump up to the big daddy 14" skillet. You will also want to get a 14" canning kettle, just for the lid. Big daddy is the American wok, you fry/brown in the hot spot in the center, and slide stuff to the edges to keep it hot. You can fry up some bacon in the hot spot, shove it the side, fry up some hash browns in the grease, shove the hash browns to the side, and then fry up some eggs, all in one pan. Perfect for fried rice, or breakfast skillets. The secret to perfect hash browns is half and half bacon grease and canola oil (to raise the smoke point), par-boiling, and oven frying them in the oven at 400F -425F in Big Daddy. Doubles as a pizza stone and roasting pan. Also great over a charcoal fire for even heat.


Just to be pedantic: mixing the fats doesn't actually raise the smoke point. All of the things in the bacon grease that will smoke will still smoke at the same temperature.

Also, while I love cast iron skillets and Dutch ovens, I vastly prefer a carbon steel wok. The weight and rapid response to heat (or lack of it) makes carbon steel ideal for most anything I use a wok for.
 
2021-08-01 11:46:35 AM  

blodyholy: Notabunny: One of my graduation gifts to Thing1 was a bunch of Lodge cookware including various skillets, lids, bread pans, pie plates, a Dutch oven, and a hibachi. He likes to cook and I wanted him to have something that will last forever. I use my grandmother's skillets from the Great Depression.

That is awesome, and will last a lifetime or more. I couldn't think of a more practical and useful gift to give to someone than good cookware. I sure hope you showed/told Thing1 how to care for it. I had a roomie that tried to put my first cast iron grill (as referenced above) in the dishwasher, and I had a mild heart attack before he hit 'Start' on the load.


https://www.reddit.com/r/castiron/com​m​ents/b8dqqo/santa_clarita_diet_so_on_p​oint/
 
2021-08-01 11:47:44 AM  

gopher321: Don't know about 'best', but my Lodge skillet is great - I stopped buying disposable non-stick skillets and just use that one.

Had to get rid of the Lodge pebbling myself though and re-season it.


I had been frustrated with the way my Lodge was causing food to stick, and figuring I had nothing to lose, I sanded that pebbling off to a mirror smooth surface, and re-seasoned in on my grill.

It's like a whole new pan!   NOW it works like everyone kept saying it should.
 
2021-08-01 11:53:15 AM  

Terminal Accessory: gopher321: Don't know about 'best', but my Lodge skillet is great - I stopped buying disposable non-stick skillets and just use that one.

Had to get rid of the Lodge pebbling myself though and re-season it.

I had been frustrated with the way my Lodge was causing food to stick, and figuring I had nothing to lose, I sanded that pebbling off to a mirror smooth surface, and re-seasoned in on my grill.

It's like a whole new pan!   NOW it works like everyone kept saying it should.


I did this for a friend. If you're doing pan fry and saute, it really makes a huge difference to mirror finish and season well.

I could shave with my reflection when my mom handed down mine.
 
2021-08-01 11:53:45 AM  
I've got a handful of 100+ year old Griswolds, a shat-ton of Lodge (a source of frequent spirited discussions with Ms. Gough), and a three-year old Smithey.  The latter was a replacement for one of those old Griswolds that we use at the cottage.  Apparently some as-yet-undetermined member of the family thermally shocked that Griswold enough to crack it, the investigation is on going.  I would have replaced it with a new Lodge pan,  but time was of the essence, so I couldn't I grind, sand, and polish as I typically do with new Lodge pans.  The Smithey may seem expensive, but it is finished to a much higher level than Lodge.

I do have one of the Lodge Chef Collection pans.  It's very handy, but does require some additional arm strength to toss veggies, etc.  compared to used a carbon steel pan.
 
2021-08-01 11:55:26 AM  
We have 4 Lodge pans. 2 12" skillets. A small skillet for frying a single egg or a grilled cheese sandwich. And an enamel covered Dutch Oven for my bread baking. We bought Lodge for their price and durability: they'll be around when Keith Richards does his cockroach fry-up when the world ends. At the time we bought them -- a million years ago for the skillets -- I didn't know there was a choice. I have no interest in comparing them to others, but I'm sure that iron doesn't suddenly change properties from vendor to vendor.
 
2021-08-01 11:59:05 AM  

phlegmjay: Psychopompous: Gubbo: Is it just me, or does anyone else find the 12 inch to be too big for the heating elements and you get uneven temps?

Or do I just need to leave it longer to come up to temp?

I find the 10" skillet to be perfect for most tasks. It is definitely easier to get cornbread out of a 10" skillet. For bigger tasks I jump up to the big daddy 14" skillet. You will also want to get a 14" canning kettle, just for the lid. Big daddy is the American wok, you fry/brown in the hot spot in the center, and slide stuff to the edges to keep it hot. You can fry up some bacon in the hot spot, shove it the side, fry up some hash browns in the grease, shove the hash browns to the side, and then fry up some eggs, all in one pan. Perfect for fried rice, or breakfast skillets. The secret to perfect hash browns is half and half bacon grease and canola oil (to raise the smoke point), par-boiling, and oven frying them in the oven at 400F -425F in Big Daddy. Doubles as a pizza stone and roasting pan. Also great over a charcoal fire for even heat.

Just to be pedantic: mixing the fats doesn't actually raise the smoke point. All of the things in the bacon grease that will smoke will still smoke at the same temperature.

Also, while I love cast iron skillets and Dutch ovens, I vastly prefer a carbon steel wok. The weight and rapid response to heat (or lack of it) makes carbon steel ideal for most anything I use a wok for.


Having tried using pure bacon grease in the oven, I noticed a visible reduction in smoke from the oven when adding some veg. oil.

I do love a lively Fark Food Tab cast iron thread.

They make the Politics Tab seem like a church social by comparison.
 
2021-08-01 11:59:44 AM  
Article is absolutely useless without discussing gas vs. electric.  It doesn't even say how they tested.  This probably means they used gas, which pretty much negates any conclusion for the unwashed masses who are stuck with electric coils.
 
2021-08-01 12:02:06 PM  

Psychopompous: phlegmjay: Psychopompous: Gubbo: Is it just me, or does anyone else find the 12 inch to be too big for the heating elements and you get uneven temps?

Or do I just need to leave it longer to come up to temp?

I find the 10" skillet to be perfect for most tasks. It is definitely easier to get cornbread out of a 10" skillet. For bigger tasks I jump up to the big daddy 14" skillet. You will also want to get a 14" canning kettle, just for the lid. Big daddy is the American wok, you fry/brown in the hot spot in the center, and slide stuff to the edges to keep it hot. You can fry up some bacon in the hot spot, shove it the side, fry up some hash browns in the grease, shove the hash browns to the side, and then fry up some eggs, all in one pan. Perfect for fried rice, or breakfast skillets. The secret to perfect hash browns is half and half bacon grease and canola oil (to raise the smoke point), par-boiling, and oven frying them in the oven at 400F -425F in Big Daddy. Doubles as a pizza stone and roasting pan. Also great over a charcoal fire for even heat.

Just to be pedantic: mixing the fats doesn't actually raise the smoke point. All of the things in the bacon grease that will smoke will still smoke at the same temperature.

Also, while I love cast iron skillets and Dutch ovens, I vastly prefer a carbon steel wok. The weight and rapid response to heat (or lack of it) makes carbon steel ideal for most anything I use a wok for.

Having tried using pure bacon grease in the oven, I noticed a visible reduction in smoke from the oven when adding some veg. oil.

I do love a lively Fark Food Tab cast iron thread.

They make the Politics Tab seem like a church social by comparison.


I have to think you're seeing a reduction in smoke because you're using a reduced amount of bacon grease.
 
2021-08-01 12:03:37 PM  

Gough: I've got a handful of 100+ year old Griswolds, a shat-ton of Lodge (a source of frequent spirited discussions with Ms. Gough), and a three-year old Smithey.  The latter was a replacement for one of those old Griswolds that we use at the cottage.  Apparently some as-yet-undetermined member of the family thermally shocked that Griswold enough to crack it, the investigation is on going.  I would have replaced it with a new Lodge pan,  but time was of the essence, so I couldn't I grind, sand, and polish as I typically do with new Lodge pans.  The Smithey may seem expensive, but it is finished to a much higher level than Lodge.

I do have one of the Lodge Chef Collection pans.  It's very handy, but does require some additional arm strength to toss veggies, etc.  compared to used a carbon steel pan.


I've wanted to do this to my lodge pans, but I am not handy and have few tools. But I do have neighbors with tools I can borrow. What process and tools do you use to smooth out your pans?
 
2021-08-01 12:16:14 PM  

phlegmjay: Gough: I've got a handful of 100+ year old Griswolds, a shat-ton of Lodge (a source of frequent spirited discussions with Ms. Gough), and a three-year old Smithey.  The latter was a replacement for one of those old Griswolds that we use at the cottage.  Apparently some as-yet-undetermined member of the family thermally shocked that Griswold enough to crack it, the investigation is on going.  I would have replaced it with a new Lodge pan,  but time was of the essence, so I couldn't I grind, sand, and polish as I typically do with new Lodge pans.  The Smithey may seem expensive, but it is finished to a much higher level than Lodge.

I do have one of the Lodge Chef Collection pans.  It's very handy, but does require some additional arm strength to toss veggies, etc.  compared to used a carbon steel pan.

I've wanted to do this to my lodge pans, but I am not handy and have few tools. But I do have neighbors with tools I can borrow. What process and tools do you use to smooth out your pans?


Palm sander (electric unless you hate yourself and want to do it by hand), a bunch of grits of sandpaper, and a lot of time, in my experience.

I've a Lodge griddle with that damn pebbling, and while it's good for a lot of things I really do need to sand that pebbling out and get it a really good cure.

My daily user skillets are a 9 inch mystery brand and an 8 inch Wagner, each a gift from one of my grandmothers and each nearing 100 years old. I have a Lodge 8 inch round griddle that I've refinished that's nice, but the skillets have cures that are unbeatable.
 
2021-08-01 12:22:24 PM  

Sword and Shield: phlegmjay: Gough: I've got a handful of 100+ year old Griswolds, a shat-ton of Lodge (a source of frequent spirited discussions with Ms. Gough), and a three-year old Smithey.  The latter was a replacement for one of those old Griswolds that we use at the cottage.  Apparently some as-yet-undetermined member of the family thermally shocked that Griswold enough to crack it, the investigation is on going.  I would have replaced it with a new Lodge pan,  but time was of the essence, so I couldn't I grind, sand, and polish as I typically do with new Lodge pans.  The Smithey may seem expensive, but it is finished to a much higher level than Lodge.

I do have one of the Lodge Chef Collection pans.  It's very handy, but does require some additional arm strength to toss veggies, etc.  compared to used a carbon steel pan.

I've wanted to do this to my lodge pans, but I am not handy and have few tools. But I do have neighbors with tools I can borrow. What process and tools do you use to smooth out your pans?

Palm sander (electric unless you hate yourself and want to do it by hand), a bunch of grits of sandpaper, and a lot of time, in my experience.

I've a Lodge griddle with that damn pebbling, and while it's good for a lot of things I really do need to sand that pebbling out and get it a really good cure.

My daily user skillets are a 9 inch mystery brand and an 8 inch Wagner, each a gift from one of my grandmothers and each nearing 100 years old. I have a Lodge 8 inch round griddle that I've refinished that's nice, but the skillets have cures that are unbeatable.


If you are an overachiever, get on down towards 800 grit and then go at it with a buffing wheel and compound.

That's overkill, but you'll feel accomplished.

And you'll need a shower.
 
2021-08-01 12:23:48 PM  
It boggles my mind that the "best" skillet made today requires sanding.

Can a manufacturer really not create the finished product?
 
2021-08-01 12:27:42 PM  

Smackledorfer: It boggles my mind that the "best" skillet made today requires sanding.

Can a manufacturer really not create the finished product?


Their theory is (since the pebbling is actually intentionally applied) is that it reduces sticking, and for some cooking that is true, especially meats. However, I find a good glassy finish and cure does better.
 
2021-08-01 12:29:59 PM  

RoLleRKoaSTeR: Don't have a skillet (glass top stove).


Same issue. I use this. No, it's not CI, but it is pretty good for everything you'd use it that for. Is now my go-to. Yes, I went cheap. To see if it was worth it.

I have not baked in it. It's 2021. And I have bakeware for that. I have a cast iron muffin pan that I love except for the work-out, cool-down, and cleaning parts. Will occasionally use it for corn muffins.
 
2021-08-01 12:31:58 PM  

Psychopompous: They make the Politics Tab seem like a church social by comparison.


No. The gourmets here at least know how to use a microwave. Proudly. The farks in the Poltab don't even vote.
 
2021-08-01 12:35:53 PM  

phlegmjay: Gough: I've got a handful of 100+ year old Griswolds, a shat-ton of Lodge (a source of frequent spirited discussions with Ms. Gough), and a three-year old Smithey.  The latter was a replacement for one of those old Griswolds that we use at the cottage.  Apparently some as-yet-undetermined member of the family thermally shocked that Griswold enough to crack it, the investigation is on going.  I would have replaced it with a new Lodge pan,  but time was of the essence, so I couldn't I grind, sand, and polish as I typically do with new Lodge pans.  The Smithey may seem expensive, but it is finished to a much higher level than Lodge.

I do have one of the Lodge Chef Collection pans.  It's very handy, but does require some additional arm strength to toss veggies, etc.  compared to used a carbon steel pan.

I've wanted to do this to my lodge pans, but I am not handy and have few tools. But I do have neighbors with tools I can borrow. What process and tools do you use to smooth out your pans?


Much live with covid, wear a mask. You don't want to breathe in all that dust
 
2021-08-01 12:38:37 PM  

Breaker Moran: We manage to cook without skillets.  And we cook a lot. Big fans of the Maillard effect but now concerned by excessive acrylamide   production so the skillets are mothballed.


You just need to chocolate cover your mothballs [Joe Walsh]
Joe Walsh brain worms whose line is it anyway
Youtube w1mG0feiEc0
 
2021-08-01 12:38:55 PM  
The Finex I won in a drawing a few years ago. But honestly, it isn't that much better than the no-name I picked up at a garage sale years back.
 
2021-08-01 1:00:21 PM  

Joey Jo Jo Jr Shabadu: The lodge stuff is decent, especially for its price range, but I kind of find the whole fascination with cast iron a bit overrated. Carbon steel pans are more versatile.

Disclaimer: my overrated claim does not include enameled dutch ovens. They're awesome.


Induction cooktop and carbon steel cookware.
 
2021-08-01 1:02:47 PM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2021-08-01 1:05:23 PM  

Smackledorfer: It boggles my mind that the "best" skillet made today requires sanding.

Can a manufacturer really not create the finished product?


It's not actually necessary. Though I want to sand/grind them smooth, my lodge pans are great as is (they're pretty thoroughly seasoned). Even new from the store and before extra seasoning, they're perfectly usable for anything other than eggs and a few other things that will stick and are delicate.
 
2021-08-01 1:06:04 PM  

RoLleRKoaSTeR: Don't have a skillet (glass top stove). I do have a Lodge griddle that I use on the grill.

Made breakfast this morning on the grill:
Hash brown patty, Glier's Goetta, Omelette.

Seems that I am the only one in my neighborhood that cooks breakfast on a grill? (yes I made pancakes and even french toast on that cast iron griddle on the grill).
One day I should get a skillet and try cooking with it on the grill...


I use a 14" lodge and 10" Dutch oven on my glass top. Haven't had issues.
 
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