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(News 13 Orlando)   Hologram technology allows healthcare students to virtually learn from patients, as it asks them to please state the nature of the medical emergency   (mynews13.com) divider line
    More: Florida, Patient, Education, University, Health care provider, Dr. Lauren Bislick Wilson, Dean, Learning, Professor  
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358 clicks; posted to STEM » on 30 Jul 2021 at 5:20 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-07-30 7:37:27 PM  
On vaguely relevant

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-07-30 7:45:15 PM  
Holodeck Four
Youtube 6lobo3c0NFg
 
2021-07-30 8:52:40 PM  
OK, this is a little confusing. This isn't for the medical person to use to appear in front of the patient, but the other way around? What do these patients have to do to make this work? Is there some kind of camera array that requires a bunch of setup for the patient? That pic jn TFA doesn't seem accurate. A hologram is a 3D image. How are they getting that with the standard digital camera on a tripod in TFA? This is cool, but more details would be nice.
 
2021-07-30 9:28:53 PM  

Mikey1969: OK, this is a little confusing. This isn't for the medical person to use to appear in front of the patient, but the other way around? What do these patients have to do to make this work? Is there some kind of camera array that requires a bunch of setup for the patient? That pic jn TFA doesn't seem accurate. A hologram is a 3D image. How are they getting that with the standard digital camera on a tripod in TFA? This is cool, but more details would be nice.


It's still pretty useless to a doctor. Doctors want to listen with stethoscopes, take blood pressure manually, look in your nose, throat, and other openings. They want to look at that rash up close and see its exact colour. They want to poke at your belly. If it's not something that requires that sort of exam then a phone call is just fine. There's nothing to gain from technology that provides an experience in between those extremes.
 
2021-07-30 11:50:44 PM  

Russ1642: Mikey1969: OK, this is a little confusing. This isn't for the medical person to use to appear in front of the patient, but the other way around? What do these patients have to do to make this work? Is there some kind of camera array that requires a bunch of setup for the patient? That pic jn TFA doesn't seem accurate. A hologram is a 3D image. How are they getting that with the standard digital camera on a tripod in TFA? This is cool, but more details would be nice.

It's still pretty useless to a doctor. Doctors want to listen with stethoscopes, take blood pressure manually, look in your nose, throat, and other openings. They want to look at that rash up close and see its exact colour. They want to poke at your belly. If it's not something that requires that sort of exam then a phone call is just fine. There's nothing to gain from technology that provides an experience in between those extremes.


Depends... I've had decent success with telemedicine, which this is. I supported a hospital's telemedicine system for a year as well. There's a lot you can do with it.

But it also has definite limitations. Things like rashes don't show up well either live on camera or trying to take pics on your phone and send them in.

So it's a mixed bag, but there are a ton of ways that it works, and I can see this working for a teaching situation, BUT, it wouldn't take the place of first hand experience, actually seeing and touching what you'll be working with.

Its like these people who don't think we need zoos anymore because you can just look at a picture of a giraffe online. Same with dissection, virtual does not replace hands on.
 
2021-07-31 6:26:51 AM  

Mikey1969: OK, this is a little confusing. This isn't for the medical person to use to appear in front of the patient, but the other way around? What do these patients have to do to make this work? Is there some kind of camera array that requires a bunch of setup for the patient? That pic jn TFA doesn't seem accurate. A hologram is a 3D image. How are they getting that with the standard digital camera on a tripod in TFA? This is cool, but more details would be nice.


This isn't for doctors to interact with patients. This is to present students with an accurate representation of someone with a disease/disability while learning. I mean, it is in the headline, it is in tfa etc. Nowhere did it say "we're going to use this for real life doctor-patient interactions.
 
2021-07-31 10:14:49 AM  
Star Trek First Contact - EMH (The Doctor)
Youtube qIslsp2WjDs
 
2021-07-31 7:35:04 PM  

DerAppie: Mikey1969: OK, this is a little confusing. This isn't for the medical person to use to appear in front of the patient, but the other way around? What do these patients have to do to make this work? Is there some kind of camera array that requires a bunch of setup for the patient? That pic jn TFA doesn't seem accurate. A hologram is a 3D image. How are they getting that with the standard digital camera on a tripod in TFA? This is cool, but more details would be nice.

This isn't for doctors to interact with patients. This is to present students with an accurate representation of someone with a disease/disability while learning. I mean, it is in the headline, it is in tfa etc. Nowhere did it say "we're going to use this for real life doctor-patient interactions.


Actually, it's 100% for doctor's and students to interface with patients, it's right in TFA.
 
2021-07-31 9:17:51 PM  

Russ1642: Mikey1969: OK, this is a little confusing. This isn't for the medical person to use to appear in front of the patient, but the other way around? What do these patients have to do to make this work? Is there some kind of camera array that requires a bunch of setup for the patient? That pic jn TFA doesn't seem accurate. A hologram is a 3D image. How are they getting that with the standard digital camera on a tripod in TFA? This is cool, but more details would be nice.

It's still pretty useless to a doctor. Doctors want to listen with stethoscopes, take blood pressure manually, look in your nose, throat, and other openings. They want to look at that rash up close and see its exact colour. They want to poke at your belly. If it's not something that requires that sort of exam then a phone call is just fine. There's nothing to gain from technology that provides an experience in between those extremes.


I can't wait until using it for 52 year old low hyperopic astigmat contact lens follow ups.
"These lenses are blurry"

"Good, good. Everything is proceeding as I have foreseen."
 
2021-08-01 3:19:12 AM  

Mikey1969: DerAppie: Mikey1969: OK, this is a little confusing. This isn't for the medical person to use to appear in front of the patient, but the other way around? What do these patients have to do to make this work? Is there some kind of camera array that requires a bunch of setup for the patient? That pic jn TFA doesn't seem accurate. A hologram is a 3D image. How are they getting that with the standard digital camera on a tripod in TFA? This is cool, but more details would be nice.

This isn't for doctors to interact with patients. This is to present students with an accurate representation of someone with a disease/disability while learning. I mean, it is in the headline, it is in tfa etc. Nowhere did it say "we're going to use this for real life doctor-patient interactions.

Actually, it's 100% for doctor's and students to interface with patients, it's right in TFA.


Is that why they are going to "create a library of patient experiences for students to learn from"? To have real world interactions with patients? This is for educational videos. Not for doctors to have live conversations with random patients.

Seriously, quote me the bit where it says doctors are going to remotely consult with patients using this technology.
 
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