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(Delish.com)   Can we have a race to see which space billionaire gives the most?   (delish.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Ad hominem, The Washington Post, Non-profit organization, BBC World Service, Fallacy, World Central Kitchen founder, Jeff Bezos, Earth  
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491 clicks; posted to Food » on 23 Jul 2021 at 7:42 AM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



15 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-07-23 3:36:11 AM  
Public works were all the rage during the gilded age. They all wanted their name on large pieces.
 
2021-07-23 8:01:42 AM  
Sweet write off *high five*
 
2021-07-23 8:03:16 AM  
We can actually just tax them, you know.
 
2021-07-23 8:07:14 AM  
Having to wait for the golden touch of one guy based on random factors is kind of the problem.
 
2021-07-23 9:08:14 AM  

EvilEgg: Public works were all the rage during the gilded age. They all wanted their name on large pieces.


Andrew Carnegie funded the construction of thousands of libraries across the world. Take a few minutes to fantasize about Bezos associating Amazon with books again by doing the same thing. He could fill them with Amazon stock and ask Dolly Parton where they need to be built.

And then the aliens he met while in space could come down and teach us all about unlimited free energy and faster than light space travel and how to convert Qultists back to reality... but I can dream, right?
 
2021-07-23 9:31:46 AM  

EvilEgg: Public works were all the rage during the gilded age. They all wanted their name on large pieces.


They also kept founding "utopias" that were basically just factories with their own towns attached that attempted to trap workers in perpetual debt.  Ford's Portlandia in Brazil and Hershey Pennsylvania both come to mind, but eventually it was just a straight up business model: open a factory/mill outside a city, build basic housing, install a store, and give employees a credit line.  It was all over the textile industry and mining across the south to the point that "mill villages" are neighborhoods in the suburbs.  Most of them have been torn down because it was shotgun shack housing (1-2 bedroom, 1 bath) with basically no yard and it's next to impossible to do anything other the rent slum housing in them.
 
2021-07-23 9:31:59 AM  
I'd rather see a race to tax those leeches at 90% marginal rate.
 
2021-07-23 9:33:25 AM  

mike_d85: EvilEgg: Public works were all the rage during the gilded age. They all wanted their name on large pieces.

They also kept founding "utopias" that were basically just factories with their own towns attached that attempted to trap workers in perpetual debt.  Ford's Portlandia in Brazil and Hershey Pennsylvania both come to mind, but eventually it was just a straight up business model: open a factory/mill outside a city, build basic housing, install a store, and give employees a credit line.  It was all over the textile industry and mining across the south to the point that "mill villages" are neighborhoods in the suburbs.  Most of them have been torn down because it was shotgun shack housing (1-2 bedroom, 1 bath) with basically no yard and it's next to impossible to do anything other the rent slum housing in them.


That's basically what hip Silicon Valley types were trying to do with their full service offices.
 
2021-07-23 9:38:45 AM  

odinsposse: mike_d85: EvilEgg: Public works were all the rage during the gilded age. They all wanted their name on large pieces.

They also kept founding "utopias" that were basically just factories with their own towns attached that attempted to trap workers in perpetual debt.  Ford's Portlandia in Brazil and Hershey Pennsylvania both come to mind, but eventually it was just a straight up business model: open a factory/mill outside a city, build basic housing, install a store, and give employees a credit line.  It was all over the textile industry and mining across the south to the point that "mill villages" are neighborhoods in the suburbs.  Most of them have been torn down because it was shotgun shack housing (1-2 bedroom, 1 bath) with basically no yard and it's next to impossible to do anything other the rent slum housing in them.

That's basically what hip Silicon Valley types were trying to do with their full service offices.


Nope, whole different concept with a similar execution (create "paradise" where you work). The full service offices allow them to extend working hours without the employee realizing it.  They OFFER time off and the regular pay but with all the services being offered in their offices employees never capitalize on them.

The mill villages were more akin to indentured servitude because employees would be trapped in a debt they had no realistic way to pay off without working for the company itself.  They were just isolated enough they couldn't get a job elsewhere and even if they did some contracts wouldn't allow them to quit if they owed the company money (which was eventually outlawed).
 
2021-07-23 12:06:22 PM  
I mean, a billionaire who gives away some money is better than a billionaire who doesn't give away any of it. I'll give him that.

We have lots of museums full of beautiful art because billionaires helped pay to build and fill them. I'll give them credit for that. They could have hoarded all that shiat and kept it to themselves. Andrew Carnegie was, reportedly, a piece of shiat, but Carnegie Hall is a public good that has helped people hear music they probably wouldn't have otherwise.

It doesn't qualify them for sainthood, but it's better than not sharing any of their wealth. At some point, reasonable people realize they can't spend it after they're dead and they don't need more homes or cars or planes.
 
2021-07-23 12:29:05 PM  

Smelly Pirate Hooker: and they don't need more homes or cars or planes.


Well obviously.

Hence the superyacht and living out the Buzz Lightyear fantasy.

I'm sure Bezos was inconsolable after learning, upon acquiring The Expanse, that his favorite character, Jules Pierre Mao, winds up locked in a hole for his crimes against humanity.
 
2021-07-23 12:39:49 PM  

mike_d85: EvilEgg: Public works were all the rage during the gilded age. They all wanted their name on large pieces.

They also kept founding "utopias" that were basically just factories with their own towns attached that attempted to trap workers in perpetual debt.  Ford's Portlandia in Brazil and Hershey Pennsylvania both come to mind, but eventually it was just a straight up business model: open a factory/mill outside a city, build basic housing, install a store, and give employees a credit line.  It was all over the textile industry and mining across the south to the point that "mill villages" are neighborhoods in the suburbs.  Most of them have been torn down because it was shotgun shack housing (1-2 bedroom, 1 bath) with basically no yard and it's next to impossible to do anything other the rent slum housing in them.


Agreed.  We should nuke Reston, VA and Columbia, MD, and start all over again.
 
2021-07-23 4:18:36 PM  

Anoria: EvilEgg: Public works were all the rage during the gilded age. They all wanted their name on large pieces.

Andrew Carnegie funded the construction of thousands of libraries across the world. Take a few minutes to fantasize about Bezos associating Amazon with books again by doing the same thing. He could fill them with Amazon stock and ask Dolly Parton where they need to be built.

And then the aliens he met while in space could come down and teach us all about unlimited free energy and faster than light space travel and how to convert Qultists back to reality... but I can dream, right?


Bill Gates has been amazing at stomping out disease in the 3rd world (where the diseases are).  Pretty much if you took his billions and wondered how you could  do the most good for the ones who need it most you would follow his lead.

Keep pointing out how Bill has the lead on "greatest philanthropist ever" around Bezos if you want him to get on the job.

/hates Microsoft
//hated Bill Gates and his Microsoft with a burning passion
///but he largely caused first world problems of me having to use kludge.  Then desktop Linux came along (if not for everyone) and I was free of DOS/Windows*.  Then Bill retired, and eventually did a similar "heel face turn" to Carnegie.  And my hatred has been dying ever since (but still pops up when I have to use Windows at work or fix my dad's windows machine).
/[bonus slashie] * time to install win10 for games (it shat the bed.  Again.).  But the SteamDeck appears win-free, so looks like they will make another try at games on Linux.  What I have now works great (possibly thanks to using an AMD GPU, didn't consider that at the time), but most of my Steam games that work with Linux are pretty out of date.
 
2021-07-23 7:49:37 PM  
Why Billionaires Won't Save Us | Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj | Netflix
Youtube mS9CFBlLOcg
 
2021-07-24 10:07:37 AM  
That is awesome to hear, and Chef Andrez has done significant work/relief/charity/disaster mitigation, and deserves this for his foundation.

That said... day late, dollar short, Bezos. How about treating your own employees as human and paying them a living wage first? Then you can double down by giving away .1% of your net worth for a tax break...
 
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