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(Some Cyclist Guy)   87 years ago today, French cyclist René Vietto gave up his own chances of winning the 1934 Tour de France by giving up his bicycle to team captain Antonin Magne. Magne won that year's tour. To this day, the French consider Vietto a true hero   (capovelo.com) divider line
    More: Hero, Tour de France, Ren Vietto, year's Tour, debut Tour de France, Mountains Classification, following year, Gino Bartali, Vietto's advantage  
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199 clicks; posted to Sports » on 22 Jul 2021 at 11:50 AM (4 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



23 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
4 days ago  
These are cool pictures of him of the bike exchange to his captain... and him waiting on the side of a mountain for the support team to provide him a new bike and/or wheel.
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Fark user imageView Full Size
 
4 days ago  
And he did it all without the use of any spandex whatsoever.  Simply amazing.
 
4 days ago  
Holy snikeys...he not only gave up his bike, he had to turn around and ride the course backwards to get it to him.

That's what riders do for their team leaders though.
 
4 days ago  
FTFA: "Vietto entered that year's French Grand Tour as a race favorite, who attacked from the second stage to seize leader's jersey in Brussels, only to lose it two days before the finish in a 139 kilometer time trial event from Vannes to Saint-Brieuc."

Fark me! A 139km (86.37 miles) time trial? That's downright sadistic and would never take place in modern times.
 
4 days ago  
Only in France do you surrender and become a national hero.
 
4 days ago  
I remember a metaphor trying to explain to non-cycling people how teams work in bike racing because it looks like an individual sport on the surface.  Think like soccer where you want to get the ball over the line for a goal.  You have all these players with skills to facilitate this.  Your top rider/team captain is the ball.
 
4 days ago  

eddie_irvine: FTFA: "Vietto entered that year's French Grand Tour as a race favorite, who attacked from the second stage to seize leader's jersey in Brussels, only to lose it two days before the finish in a 139 kilometer time trial event from Vannes to Saint-Brieuc."

Fark me! A 139km (86.37 miles) time trial? That's downright sadistic and would never take place in modern times.


Sadism seems to have been a feature of the early tours.  Can't find it now, but I remember seeing a story how the founder wanted it so almost nobody could successfully finish.

The first tour
 
4 days ago  
That would never happen today.   Especially as Racing bikes are usually tuned for the individual rider these days.
 
4 days ago  
i1.wp.comView Full Size


Still blows me away that to this day, the basic design of these bikes is the same. THe frames are the same basic shape, the pedals and gears are still set up the same. Same handlebars and rims. Hell, even the same brakes in some cases, since some pros still prefer the rim brakes over disc brakes. Components have been upgraded, but in many cases are basically the same today. Everything is lighter and stronger, but the base design looks the same. 

external-content.duckduckgo.comView Full Size
 
4 days ago  

Mikey1969: [i1.wp.com image 850x637]

Still blows me away that to this day, the basic design of these bikes is the same. THe frames are the same basic shape, the pedals and gears are still set up the same. Same handlebars and rims. Hell, even the same brakes in some cases, since some pros still prefer the rim brakes over disc brakes. Components have been upgraded, but in many cases are basically the same today. Everything is lighter and stronger, but the base design looks the same.

[external-content.duckduckgo.com image 350x190]


The Forney Museum in Denver has a wall of vintage bicycles showing designs and ideas from the early days.  You can see part of it in the background here:

Fark user imageView Full Size


Among the things there are ones with a drive shaft as opposed to a chain.  Bike that was an up and down pedal action rather than circular.  But despite all of that, aside from the penny-farthing style that you can see here as well, the frames would still mostly be familiar looking.  I guess they figured that one out pretty quick.
 
4 days ago  

Myk-House of El: Mikey1969: [i1.wp.com image 850x637]

Still blows me away that to this day, the basic design of these bikes is the same. THe frames are the same basic shape, the pedals and gears are still set up the same. Same handlebars and rims. Hell, even the same brakes in some cases, since some pros still prefer the rim brakes over disc brakes. Components have been upgraded, but in many cases are basically the same today. Everything is lighter and stronger, but the base design looks the same.

[external-content.duckduckgo.com image 350x190]

The Forney Museum in Denver has a wall of vintage bicycles showing designs and ideas from the early days.  You can see part of it in the background here:

[Fark user image 850x569]

Among the things there are ones with a drive shaft as opposed to a chain.  Bike that was an up and down pedal action rather than circular.  But despite all of that, aside from the penny-farthing style that you can see here as well, the frames would still mostly be familiar looking.  I guess they figured that one out pretty quick.


Recently rode a bike with a bely rather than a chain. It was like pedaling butter, it was so smooth. :-)

But yeah, that's what I was talking about. They found a style that worked, and with some exceptions, that style has stayed almost exactly the same. It's the parts that have improved. It would be interesting to have one of these guys from 1934 pick up one of these carbon fiber frames. I bet a new bike, like the one I pictured, weighs as much (or less) than just the frame from back then.
 
4 days ago  

Mikey1969: [i1.wp.com image 850x637]

Still blows me away that to this day, the basic design of these bikes is the same. THe frames are the same basic shape, the pedals and gears are still set up the same. Same handlebars and rims. Hell, even the same brakes in some cases, since some pros still prefer the rim brakes over disc brakes. Components have been upgraded, but in many cases are basically the same today. Everything is lighter and stronger, but the base design looks the same. 

[external-content.duckduckgo.com image 350x190]


Mostly thanks to dictates from UCI (union cycliste internationale).  Otherwise a recumbent could easily win, although it isn't clear that recumbents would ever make sense for most bicycle use, no matter what the "win on Sunday, sell on Monday" people would say.  If UCI demands we use a 1930s bicycle, who are we to question them?

They only allowed disc brakes a few years ago in the TdF, no matter how long they've been all but mandatory on mountain bikes.

Not sure when they put in a weight limit (expect current racers to include some ballast), but it isn't *that* hard to hit (although you can probably buy a new motorcycle cheaper, easily a good used one).  There was a thread yesterday (or the day before) claiming you couldn't do squat with a 1lb (~500g) motor+battery.  On the contrary, getting a few more hp (745W) during a sprint really matters: plenty of racers are all about that last sprint and simply maintain position in the peloton the rest of the way.
 
4 days ago  

grimlock1972: That would never happen today.   Especially as Racing bikes are usually tuned for the individual rider these days.


And the support car has plenty of spare jokes.
 
4 days ago  

yet_another_wumpus: Mostly thanks to dictates from UCI (union cycliste internationale). Otherwise a recumbent could easily win, although it isn't clear that recumbents would ever make sense for most bicycle use, no matter what the "win on Sunday, sell on Monday" people would say. If UCI demands we use a 1930s bicycle, who are we to question them?

They only allowed disc brakes a few years ago in the TdF, no matter how long they've been all but mandatory on mountain bikes.


Recumbents are still not all that good on big climbs.   I remember several during my 3 Ride the Rockies rides and even my slow ass could pass them up the Rockies.   The power delivery just wouldn't be there.
 
4 days ago  

Mikey1969: [i1.wp.com image 850x637]

Still blows me away that to this day, the basic design of these bikes is the same. THe frames are the same basic shape, the pedals and gears are still set up the same. Same handlebars and rims. Hell, even the same brakes in some cases, since some pros still prefer the rim brakes over disc brakes. Components have been upgraded, but in many cases are basically the same today. Everything is lighter and stronger, but the base design looks the same. 

[external-content.duckduckgo.com image 350x190]


They re not allowed to change the design per regulations.
 
4 days ago  

yet_another_wumpus: Mikey1969: [i1.wp.com image 850x637]

Still blows me away that to this day, the basic design of these bikes is the same. THe frames are the same basic shape, the pedals and gears are still set up the same. Same handlebars and rims. Hell, even the same brakes in some cases, since some pros still prefer the rim brakes over disc brakes. Components have been upgraded, but in many cases are basically the same today. Everything is lighter and stronger, but the base design looks the same. 

[external-content.duckduckgo.com image 350x190]

Mostly thanks to dictates from UCI (union cycliste internationale).  Otherwise a recumbent could easily win, although it isn't clear that recumbents would ever make sense for most bicycle use, no matter what the "win on Sunday, sell on Monday" people would say.  If UCI demands we use a 1930s bicycle, who are we to question them?

They only allowed disc brakes a few years ago in the TdF, no matter how long they've been all but mandatory on mountain bikes.

Not sure when they put in a weight limit (expect current racers to include some ballast), but it isn't *that* hard to hit (although you can probably buy a new motorcycle cheaper, easily a good used one).  There was a thread yesterday (or the day before) claiming you couldn't do squat with a 1lb (~500g) motor+battery.  On the contrary, getting a few more hp (745W) during a sprint really matters: plenty of racers are all about that last sprint and simply maintain position in the peloton the rest of the way.


LOL, no, a recumbent wouln't easily win. In fact, it wouldn't even meet the time cut on the first major mountain stage. This is a trope that a lot of recumbent riders smugly push, that they aren't allowed in bike races because they are an so much faster than an upright. That simply isn't true. Recumbents are really good at one thing: going fast in a straight line on flat ground - and that is it. They handle abysmally, so high-speed turns are out, which in turn means fast descents. As for climbing? They climb even worse than they handle. You can't get up on top of a gear and stomp on the pedals like an upright and you are pedaling against gravity. This video by GCN shows how bad they (don't) turn, and how terribly they go up hill: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lD53Y​i​ygVhA
 
4 days ago  

Ketchuponsteak: Mikey1969: [i1.wp.com image 850x637]

Still blows me away that to this day, the basic design of these bikes is the same. THe frames are the same basic shape, the pedals and gears are still set up the same. Same handlebars and rims. Hell, even the same brakes in some cases, since some pros still prefer the rim brakes over disc brakes. Components have been upgraded, but in many cases are basically the same today. Everything is lighter and stronger, but the base design looks the same. 

[external-content.duckduckgo.com image 350x190]

They re not allowed to change the design per regulations.


They're allowed to do whatever they want for the commercial market.

And the commercial market is is waaaaaaay bigger than the professional market. The professional market really serves as marketing for the commercial market, that's all.

So they can make any changes they want, but it still stays close to the original design.
 
4 days ago  

grimlock1972: That would never happen today.   Especially as Racing bikes are usually tuned for the individual rider these days.


Nope, it happens all the time and I saw several instances of it in this year's Tour. Especially toward the end of a stage when waiting for a team car is unrealistic - a teammate's bike, while not being a perfect fit is a far better option. Other good instances are when it's in the middle of a stage and you temporary swap until the team car can get to you. Michael Rogers won the 2002 TDU on a spectator's bike: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02mCf​0​nyyEk
 
4 days ago  

yet_another_wumpus: Mikey1969: [i1.wp.com image 850x637]

Still blows me away that to this day, the basic design of these bikes is the same. THe frames are the same basic shape, the pedals and gears are still set up the same. Same handlebars and rims. Hell, even the same brakes in some cases, since some pros still prefer the rim brakes over disc brakes. Components have been upgraded, but in many cases are basically the same today. Everything is lighter and stronger, but the base design looks the same. 

[external-content.duckduckgo.com image 350x190]

Mostly thanks to dictates from UCI (union cycliste internationale).  Otherwise a recumbent could easily win, although it isn't clear that recumbents would ever make sense for most bicycle use, no matter what the "win on Sunday, sell on Monday" people would say.  If UCI demands we use a 1930s bicycle, who are we to question them?

They only allowed disc brakes a few years ago in the TdF, no matter how long they've been all but mandatory on mountain bikes.

Not sure when they put in a weight limit (expect current racers to include some ballast), but it isn't *that* hard to hit (although you can probably buy a new motorcycle cheaper, easily a good used one).  There was a thread yesterday (or the day before) claiming you couldn't do squat with a 1lb (~500g) motor+battery.  On the contrary, getting a few more hp (745W) during a sprint really matters: plenty of racers are all about that last sprint and simply maintain position in the peloton the rest of the way.


As I mentioned in another post, the professional market is really just advertising for the commercial market, so they don't really need to be tied to the racing market directly. They could come out with designs that were better than what was allowed if they wanted to, but the base design just works. These bikes are definitely getting crazy light nowadays. i can pick them up here at work, and with the road bikes especially, you can feel that the majority of the weight is now on the back tire, between the rim, the tube, the tire, the hub, and the cassette.

And even THAT is light.
 
4 days ago  

eddie_irvine: grimlock1972: That would never happen today.   Especially as Racing bikes are usually tuned for the individual rider these days.

Nope, it happens all the time and I saw several instances of it in this year's Tour. Especially toward the end of a stage when waiting for a team car is unrealistic - a teammate's bike, while not being a perfect fit is a far better option. Other good instances are when it's in the middle of a stage and you temporary swap until the team car can get to you. Michael Rogers won the 2002 TDU on a spectator's bike: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02mCf0​nyyEk


Not only that, a lot of tuning is saddle and handlebar height. There's more that goes into it, but it's things like rims, tires, shifters, little things. But the biggest fitting issue is those two. Once those are set, someone using a substitute bike could probably get used to it pretty quick. And with these drop saddles, that part is even easier. No, it wouldn't be a perfect fit, but you could make it work for sure.
 
4 days ago  

Mikey1969: Ketchuponsteak: Mikey1969: [i1.wp.com image 850x637]

Still blows me away that to this day, the basic design of these bikes is the same. THe frames are the same basic shape, the pedals and gears are still set up the same. Same handlebars and rims. Hell, even the same brakes in some cases, since some pros still prefer the rim brakes over disc brakes. Components have been upgraded, but in many cases are basically the same today. Everything is lighter and stronger, but the base design looks the same. 

[external-content.duckduckgo.com image 350x190]

They re not allowed to change the design per regulations.

They're allowed to do whatever they want for the commercial market.

And the commercial market is is waaaaaaay bigger than the professional market. The professional market really serves as marketing for the commercial market, that's all.

So they can make any changes they want, but it still stays close to the original design.


The commercial market is bigger, and you're right that it's marketing. But, it's really difficult to find non-UCI compliant designs commercially available. The most recent that I can think of is the DiamondBack Andean, but that was discontinued in 2019  - Google image search it and tell me if you'd like to be caught in a massive crosswind while on it. The UCI has some pretty dumb regs, but the ones surrounding bike design are pretty solid. A traditional diamond-frame is optimally rigid and failure resistant. Tube dimension regs allow for a good balance of weight, aerodynamics, and handling. I ride a lot of miles (I'll tip past 5,000 for the year this evening) and I can't recall ever seeing a bike with a radical (non-UCI compliant) design on the roads.

As for the motor thing - that was discussed ad nauseum. It's a theorhetical concern because the bikes are throughly inspected.
 
4 days ago  

eddie_irvine: Mikey1969: Ketchuponsteak: Mikey1969: [i1.wp.com image 850x637]

Still blows me away that to this day, the basic design of these bikes is the same. THe frames are the same basic shape, the pedals and gears are still set up the same. Same handlebars and rims. Hell, even the same brakes in some cases, since some pros still prefer the rim brakes over disc brakes. Components have been upgraded, but in many cases are basically the same today. Everything is lighter and stronger, but the base design looks the same. 

[external-content.duckduckgo.com image 350x190]

They re not allowed to change the design per regulations.

They're allowed to do whatever they want for the commercial market.

And the commercial market is is waaaaaaay bigger than the professional market. The professional market really serves as marketing for the commercial market, that's all.

So they can make any changes they want, but it still stays close to the original design.

The commercial market is bigger, and you're right that it's marketing. But, it's really difficult to find non-UCI compliant designs commercially available. The most recent that I can think of is the DiamondBack Andean, but that was discontinued in 2019  - Google image search it and tell me if you'd like to be caught in a massive crosswind while on it. The UCI has some pretty dumb regs, but the ones surrounding bike design are pretty solid. A traditional diamond-frame is optimally rigid and failure resistant. Tube dimension regs allow for a good balance of weight, aerodynamics, and handling. I ride a lot of miles (I'll tip past 5,000 for the year this evening) and I can't recall ever seeing a bike with a radical (non-UCI compliant) design on the roads.

As for the motor thing - that was discussed ad nauseum. It's a theorhetical concern because the bikes are throughly inspected.


Wow, yeah, that looks like a giant airfoil. Specialized tried it on their Shiv, but even that's not as bad...

external-content.duckduckgo.comView Full Size
 
4 days ago  

Mikey1969: Ketchuponsteak: Mikey1969: [i1.wp.com image 850x637]

Still blows me away that to this day, the basic design of these bikes is the same. THe frames are the same basic shape, the pedals and gears are still set up the same. Same handlebars and rims. Hell, even the same brakes in some cases, since some pros still prefer the rim brakes over disc brakes. Components have been upgraded, but in many cases are basically the same today. Everything is lighter and stronger, but the base design looks the same. 

[external-content.duckduckgo.com image 350x190]

They re not allowed to change the design per regulations.

They're allowed to do whatever they want for the commercial market.

And the commercial market is is waaaaaaay bigger than the professional market. The professional market really serves as marketing for the commercial market, that's all.

So they can make any changes they want, but it still stays close to the original design.


So you can use your commercial bike in races.

There's inclined bikes though.
 
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