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(Bothell-Kenmore Reporter)   The top ten percent of gasoline-using drivers are 'superusers' who use a third of all the gas, study finds, as researchers hope to find some way to sudo switch_to_electric   (bothell-reporter.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Internal combustion engine, Automobile, Vehicle, Electric vehicle, Gasoline Superusers, Electric vehicles, electric vehicles, Household income in the United States  
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2109 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Jul 2021 at 9:08 PM (13 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-07-21 6:50:54 PM  
We have plenty of gas and never ran low, much less ran out. Also plenty of water, and we don't have to buy it from anyone else. We don't have wildfires, either, and our flooding never causes mudslides.

But y'all just couldn't stand to live in something called a flyover state, right?

[NelsonHaHa.jpg]

*smugly buffs her nails*
 
2021-07-21 8:33:31 PM  
"Getting gasoline superusers into [electric vehicles] as quickly as possible is critical to hitting our climate goals because they consume a third of U.S. gasoline," said Matthew Metz, the lead author of the report and founder and co-executive director of Coltura.

I used to be a "gasoline superuser" - my office was 99 miles from my house. Electric cars will not be a cheap enough option for people who need to travel long distances on a daily basis, even in a best case scenario where they get a full eight hours of charging while they are at work. Tesla's supercharger network is concentrated in some cities but largely ignores rural areas. I'd imagine the other class of super users are traveling salesmen or traveling support types that drive an extensive amount of miles per day.

The people the study talks about are the hardest people to get into electric cars because they are most likely to live in areas that don't have the infrastructure for it or the income to support the premium on the cars. Yeah, you'll save money on gas, but a used Model3 still costs $45K and you have to find all that money up front. It's never going to replace a $3000 shiatbox with a small I4 and a 10 gallon gas tank.
 
2021-07-21 9:13:36 PM  

Cafe Threads: We have plenty of gas and never ran low, much less ran out. Also plenty of water, and we don't have to buy it from anyone else. We don't have wildfires, either, and our flooding never causes mudslides.

But y'all just couldn't stand to live in something called a flyover state, right?

[NelsonHaHa.jpg]

*smugly buffs her nails*


Yet
 
2021-07-21 9:13:56 PM  
There's a Brothel Reporter?  Hawt damn.
 
2021-07-21 9:14:56 PM  

WickerNipple: There's a Brothel Reporter?  Hawt damn.


Yeah, but they have to review the bad ones, too.
 
2021-07-21 9:15:50 PM  
You can't fix transportation carbon emissions without fixing land use so more people can afford to live closer to where they work.

You can't fix land use so more people can afford to live closer to where they work without turning NIMBY boomers into lamp shades.

Good luck with that.
 
2021-07-21 9:17:07 PM  
Many Bothells died to bring us this information.
 
2021-07-21 9:19:54 PM  
So you're saying that Bubba Thibideaux in Buttfark, Louisiana driving a Ferd Fteenthousand is using more gas than 10 people?

I'm shocked! Shocked!
/Well, not that shocked
 
2021-07-21 9:20:34 PM  

Lsherm: "Getting gasoline superusers into [electric vehicles] as quickly as possible is critical to hitting our climate goals because they consume a third of U.S. gasoline," said Matthew Metz, the lead author of the report and founder and co-executive director of Coltura.

I used to be a "gasoline superuser" - my office was 99 miles from my house. Electric cars will not be a cheap enough option for people who need to travel long distances on a daily basis, even in a best case scenario where they get a full eight hours of charging while they are at work. Tesla's supercharger network is concentrated in some cities but largely ignores rural areas. I'd imagine the other class of super users are traveling salesmen or traveling support types that drive an extensive amount of miles per day.

The people the study talks about are the hardest people to get into electric cars because they are most likely to live in areas that don't have the infrastructure for it or the income to support the premium on the cars. Yeah, you'll save money on gas, but a used Model3 still costs $45K and you have to find all that money up front. It's never going to replace a $3000 shiatbox with a small I4 and a 10 gallon gas tank.


A Model 3 will charge from empty to full in 8.5 hours with a 7.5 kW charger. If you are driving 300+ miles each way to and from work, you can easily charge to full at work and overnight. If you're only driving 99 miles each way, you don't even need to bother with charging at work - just plug it in when you get home just like you do with your cell phone.

As far as cost, Tesla isn't the only option out there.. First dealer that came up on a Google search has a cetified used 2020 Bolt with 8,000 miles for under $25k with all the usual financing options. That one gets you 260 miles per charge so you can definitely do it round trip with your 198 mile commute in one charge but topping off a bit at work would be helpful.

In a couple years as more and more companies are making EVs, you'll get plenty of options to choose from at sticker prices competitive with ICEs with next to no maintenance and vastly cheaper to fuel.
 
2021-07-21 9:21:28 PM  

WalkingSedgwick: You can't fix land use so more people can afford to live closer to where they work without turning NIMBY boomers into lamp shades.


A bold and decisive strategy to seize the moral high ground in the debate over energy options.
 
2021-07-21 9:21:46 PM  
When the U.S. gets a reliable electric grid that can handle this sea change in a car dependent culture, let me know.

Right now, our power grid can't keep people safe in their own homes with the slightest "extremes" in temperature norms.
 
2021-07-21 9:22:02 PM  
Want people to switch to electric cars?
Make them more affordable.
 
2021-07-21 9:23:01 PM  

abhorrent1: Want people to switch to electric cars?
Make them more affordable.


Yep. I looked at electric cars last time around and this was my only deal-breaker.
 
2021-07-21 9:24:04 PM  

Lsherm: I'd imagine the other class of super users are traveling salesmen or traveling support types that drive an extensive amount of miles per day.


Traveling salesmen shouldnt be a thing in 2021.
 
2021-07-21 9:24:51 PM  
Not directly connected, but one of my favorite "factoids" on gasoline is that it was originally a waste product in the production of kerosene.  They used to just dump it, as the too volatile liquid was useless to them, but eventually they figured we should find a use for it so we can make more money.  Hence we eventually ran cars on the stuff.
 
2021-07-21 9:25:32 PM  

SplittingAces: When the U.S. gets a reliable electric grid that can handle this sea change in a car dependent culture, let me know.

Right now, our power grid can't keep people safe in their own homes with the slightest "extremes" in temperature norms.


After a few more years of blackouts during sweltering summer days, I think that most of the US will accept the need to expand generation capacity.

Probably not California, though.
 
2021-07-21 9:25:35 PM  
I have always thought that the first hybrids should have been pick-ups not compacts for a few reasons.
1) compacts are already so efficient that there is little to gain by making them hybrid.  10% more efficiency on a 15mpg truck saves you a lot more gas than 10% more efficiency on a 40mpg car.
2) The boost to low end torque that the electric motor provides would make the truck more responsive when hauling heavy loads.
3) The physical size of trucks makes them a better platform for all the extra hardware that a hybrid drive requires without cramming pieces into every nook and crack of the vehicle.(anyone who's ever worked on a Prius knows what I mean)
 
2021-07-21 9:25:37 PM  
Um....you're going to need /root for THAT shiz.
 
2021-07-21 9:25:56 PM  

Cafe Threads: We have plenty of gas and never ran low, much less ran out. Also plenty of water, and we don't have to buy it from anyone else. We don't have wildfires, either, and our flooding never causes mudslides.

But y'all just couldn't stand to live in something called a flyover state, right?

[NelsonHaHa.jpg]

*smugly buffs her nails*


i.ytimg.comView Full Size
 
2021-07-21 9:27:07 PM  

Lsherm: I used to be a "gasoline superuser" - my office was 99 miles from my house.


Yeah you put yourself in this dumb farking situation
By no means does it make sense to spend 3 hours in a car every day unless your job involves driving
Don't take a job in another city

//Jesus christ america is stupid
 
2021-07-21 9:27:38 PM  

WalkingSedgwick: You can't fix transportation carbon emissions without fixing land use so more people can afford to live closer to where they work


There should be a nationwide plan to stop companies from building in cities, especially downtown and spread the goddamn workplaces around so its not all in the same farking place.

It would cut down traffic, and people could live near their jobs without paying a shiatload of money for housing.

But then the government/city/state would need to control which corporation can build where aka CITY PLANNING and we cant have that because corporations selfish needs (usually just one or a couple of rich white dudes) are more important than the millions of people affected by their decisions.
 
2021-07-21 9:28:09 PM  

abhorrent1: Want people to switch to electric cars?
Make them more affordable.


What counts as affordable?
 
2021-07-21 9:28:20 PM  

meanmutton: As far as cost, Tesla isn't the only option out there.. First dealer that came up on a Google search has a cetified used 2020 Bolt with 8,000 miles for under $25k with all the usual financing options. That one gets you 260 miles per charge so you can definitely do it round trip with your 198 mile commute in one charge but topping off a bit at work would be helpful.


Range models are, naturally, optimistic. Bolt ranges in real life aren't anywhere near 260 miles per charge.

I would not recommend an electric car to someone who needs their car for their job at this point unless they were driving 50 miles a day or less AND they had a place to charge their car while they were at work. Of course, this also ignores people who live in apartment buildings without any charging at home, either.

And $25K is a huge expense for people in rural areas, who are probably driving to population centers so they can make more money. They aren't living 80 miles from work for the hell of it - it's because that's where the real estate drops off. Electric cars are still the domain of the well-off.
 
2021-07-21 9:29:29 PM  
Who are these people? I'm assuming this data set excludes pro long-haul truckers etc. and is limited to personal transportation. Extreme commuters or recreational joyriders?
/I honestly don't like being on the road anymore unless necessary
 
2021-07-21 9:32:54 PM  

Lsherm: "Getting gasoline superusers into [electric vehicles] as quickly as possible is critical to hitting our climate goals because they consume a third of U.S. gasoline," said Matthew Metz, the lead author of the report and founder and co-executive director of Coltura.

I used to be a "gasoline superuser" - my office was 99 miles from my house. Electric cars will not be a cheap enough option for people who need to travel long distances on a daily basis, even in a best case scenario where they get a full eight hours of charging while they are at work. Tesla's supercharger network is concentrated in some cities but largely ignores rural areas. I'd imagine the other class of super users are traveling salesmen or traveling support types that drive an extensive amount of miles per day.

The people the study talks about are the hardest people to get into electric cars because they are most likely to live in areas that don't have the infrastructure for it or the income to support the premium on the cars. Yeah, you'll save money on gas, but a used Model3 still costs $45K and you have to find all that money up front. It's never going to replace a $3000 shiatbox with a small I4 and a 10 gallon gas tank.


/
Yeah let's just gloss over that it really should be against the law to have a long commute.


//
Spent my life knowing a dipshiat that lives in one city and commutes every day into another city to run his business and so do all his family and extended family.
I get it it's nice to have nice little cheap piece of property and build a extremely beautiful house on it and enjoy the lower cost of living of the one like town and make big bucks in the city.
It's all very smart but it's destroying the environment you pieces of shiat
 
2021-07-21 9:33:50 PM  

WalkingSedgwick: You can't fix transportation carbon emissions without fixing land use so more people can afford to live closer to where they work.

You can't fix land use so more people can afford to live closer to where they work without turning NIMBY boomers into lamp shades.

Good luck with that.


What a crock of crap the fact that matter is people live in the rural areas so they can get cheap land to build expensive houses on and enjoy a different text rate and a different property tax assessments and then go work in the city for big bucks and enjoy the difference between cost of living and rate of pay those people are scumbags and need to be stopped
 
2021-07-21 9:35:09 PM  

State_College_Arsonist: SplittingAces: When the U.S. gets a reliable electric grid that can handle this sea change in a car dependent culture, let me know.

Right now, our power grid can't keep people safe in their own homes with the slightest "extremes" in temperature norms.

After a few more years of blackouts during sweltering summer days, I think that most of the US will accept the need to expand generation capacity.

Probably not California, though.


California led the charge when it came deregulation of utilities in the 90s, when it was still a red state. TX went "fark yeah" and doubled down. CA leg has gone "blue" since I moved, but has let this shiat run amok.
 
2021-07-21 9:35:25 PM  

SplittingAces: When the U.S. gets a reliable electric grid that can handle this sea change in a car dependent culture, let me know.

Right now, our power grid can't keep people safe in their own homes with the slightest "extremes" in temperature norms.


That's not a design flaw that's a built-in feature.
Thanks Ronald Reagan
 
2021-07-21 9:35:48 PM  
When we lived in Katy, TX (Houston 'burb), I worked in Tomball (another Houston 'burb), and wife was going to U og H (near downtown) and had 1 car, we put 94k miles on the one car we had in 1 year.
 
2021-07-21 9:36:06 PM  

Sporkabob: Not directly connected, but one of my favorite "factoids" on gasoline is that it was originally a waste product in the production of kerosene.  They used to just dump it, as the too volatile liquid was useless to them, but eventually they figured we should find a use for it so we can make more money.  Hence we eventually ran cars on the stuff.


/
That is also true about whey protein it used to be considered garbage and then somebody figured out you could sell it to idiots
 
2021-07-21 9:36:29 PM  
People who drive the most use the most gas?  This is the hardcore journalism I live for.
 
2021-07-21 9:36:47 PM  

moothemagiccow: Lsherm: I used to be a "gasoline superuser" - my office was 99 miles from my house.

Yeah you put yourself in this dumb farking situation
By no means does it make sense to spend 3 hours in a car every day unless your job involves driving
Don't take a job in another city

//Jesus christ america is stupid


Exactly
 
2021-07-21 9:37:24 PM  

Sporkabob: Not directly connected, but one of my favorite "factoids" on gasoline is that it was originally a waste product in the production of kerosene.  They used to just dump it, as the too volatile liquid was useless to them, but eventually they figured we should find a use for it so we can make more money.  Hence we eventually ran cars on the stuff.


I know this from watching The Men Who Built America. I loved it and totally recommend it.
 
2021-07-21 9:37:40 PM  

berylman: Who are these people? I'm assuming this data set excludes pro long-haul truckers etc. and is limited to personal transportation. Extreme commuters or recreational joyriders?
/I honestly don't like being on the road anymore unless necessary


In the '90s alone I logged 400,000 miles and the vast majority were superfluous and for shiats and giggles because I don't like sitting around the house doing nothing
¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 
2021-07-21 9:38:17 PM  

Lsherm: "Getting gasoline superusers into [electric vehicles] as quickly as possible is critical to hitting our climate goals because they consume a third of U.S. gasoline," said Matthew Metz, the lead author of the report and founder and co-executive director of Coltura.

I used to be a "gasoline superuser" - my office was 99 miles from my house. Electric cars will not be a cheap enough option for people who need to travel long distances on a daily basis, even in a best case scenario where they get a full eight hours of charging while they are at work. Tesla's supercharger network is concentrated in some cities but largely ignores rural areas. I'd imagine the other class of super users are traveling salesmen or traveling support types that drive an extensive amount of miles per day.

The people the study talks about are the hardest people to get into electric cars because they are most likely to live in areas that don't have the infrastructure for it or the income to support the premium on the cars. Yeah, you'll save money on gas, but a used Model3 still costs $45K and you have to find all that money up front. It's never going to replace a $3000 shiatbox with a small I4 and a 10 gallon gas tank.


Same here. My job requires me to visit a half dozen to a dozen disparate homesites a day and I rack up 200-300 miles a day during the week.

In 2019, I did 58,000 miles alone.

As for the article, yeah, the 80/20 rules strikes again.
 
2021-07-21 9:39:04 PM  
I think most Americans are super users of natural resources anyway. I know I'm one and I don't own a car.
/Keep it real. I know I don't need all this shiat, but I'll buy it anyway
 
2021-07-21 9:40:06 PM  

WalkingSedgwick: .. turning NIMBY boomers into lamp shades ..
---


Is this a U.S. expression that only Americans understand ?
 
2021-07-21 9:40:06 PM  
Article said 1000 gallons a year, and I thought there's no way I'm not in that group.

The I did the math and realized Im at 2/2 to less than 1/2 that amount, and it's not like I'm:

1. Easy on the pedal
2. Driving on the highway
3. Live *that* close to work (depending on traffic it can be 20 minutes, or an hour)
4. Driving the most fuel efficient vehicle on the planet (1st generation Toyota Highlander-yeah, it's almost 20years old, but it runs, is in good shape, cheap to maintain, and is extremely reliable)

So, about 8-10 gallons a week.

This led me to the wonder who uses 1000 gallons per year unless you're in sales, or have another job that requires you to travel all over the place.

That being said, this pandemic only has me filling up my car about once every 4 to 6 weeks.
 
2021-07-21 9:40:39 PM  

waxbeans: SplittingAces: When the U.S. gets a reliable electric grid that can handle this sea change in a car dependent culture, let me know.

Right now, our power grid can't keep people safe in their own homes with the slightest "extremes" in temperature norms.

That's not a design flaw that's a built-in feature.
Thanks Ronald Reagan


The deregulation really took hold with Deaukmajian (sp?) and Pete Wilson. CA between 89 and 95 was just a preview of what TX and FL are now.
 
2021-07-21 9:40:57 PM  

meanmutton: Lsherm: "Getting gasoline superusers into [electric vehicles] as quickly as possible is critical to hitting our climate goals because they consume a third of U.S. gasoline," said Matthew Metz, the lead author of the report and founder and co-executive director of Coltura.

I used to be a "gasoline superuser" - my office was 99 miles from my house. Electric cars will not be a cheap enough option for people who need to travel long distances on a daily basis, even in a best case scenario where they get a full eight hours of charging while they are at work. Tesla's supercharger network is concentrated in some cities but largely ignores rural areas. I'd imagine the other class of super users are traveling salesmen or traveling support types that drive an extensive amount of miles per day.

The people the study talks about are the hardest people to get into electric cars because they are most likely to live in areas that don't have the infrastructure for it or the income to support the premium on the cars. Yeah, you'll save money on gas, but a used Model3 still costs $45K and you have to find all that money up front. It's never going to replace a $3000 shiatbox with a small I4 and a 10 gallon gas tank.

A Model 3 will charge from empty to full in 8.5 hours with a 7.5 kW charger. If you are driving 300+ miles each way to and from work, you can easily charge to full at work and overnight. If you're only driving 99 miles each way, you don't even need to bother with charging at work - just plug it in when you get home just like you do with your cell phone.

As far as cost, Tesla isn't the only option out there.. First dealer that came up on a Google search has a cetified used 2020 Bolt with 8,000 miles for under $25k with all the usual financing options. That one gets you 260 miles per charge


Sure -- as long as it still has the new-car fresh-from-the-factory smell, has one <100lbs driver and no passengers or cargo, and you never turn on the A/C or heater, and it's neither cold not hot outside.

Otherwise, "your mileage may vary".

Greatly. But somehow never in your favor.
 
2021-07-21 9:41:32 PM  

waxbeans: /
Yeah let's just gloss over that it really should be against the law to have a long commute.


//
Spent my life knowing a dipshiat that lives in one city and commutes every day into another city to run his business and so do all his family and extended family.
I get it it's nice to have nice little cheap piece of property and build a extremely beautiful house on it and enjoy the lower cost of living of the one like town and make big bucks in the city.
It's all very smart but it's destroying the environment you pieces of shiat


What a pointless thing to get upset about.
 
2021-07-21 9:42:28 PM  
I'm a field technician.
I have a company van.
Technically I live near my work because I'm supposed to be assigned calls not more than 30 minutes from my house.
Reality is I drive around up to 300 Miles a day.
If my company gave me an electric vehicle, I have no way to charge it unless I run an extension cord out to it. They would also have to pay me for the electricity.
I would also have to find somewhere to charge it during the day so I could complete my day and get home.
We just don't have the infrastructure in place.
Every maker of of EVs needs to standardize chargers and get stations out there.
Prices need to drop.
Get the infrastructure in place and make low priced EVs available, I'm there.
 
2021-07-21 9:42:31 PM  

waxbeans: WalkingSedgwick: You can't fix transportation carbon emissions without fixing land use so more people can afford to live closer to where they work.

You can't fix land use so more people can afford to live closer to where they work without turning NIMBY boomers into lamp shades.

Good luck with that.

What a crock of crap the fact that matter is people live in the rural areas so they can get cheap land to build expensive houses on and enjoy a different text rate and a different property tax assessments and then go work in the city for big bucks and enjoy the difference between cost of living and rate of pay those people are scumbags and need to be stopped


You know not everyone wants to live in close enough proximity to hear their neighbor fart, right?

/ymmv, but I'll take my acreage any day over an apartment.
 
2021-07-21 9:42:41 PM  

lolmao500: Lsherm: I'd imagine the other class of super users are traveling salesmen or traveling support types that drive an extensive amount of miles per day.

Traveling salesmen shouldnt be a thing in 2021.


Traveling inspectors?

Like how poultry is contracted out to be raised, but the owner of the chickens sends someone to check up on the various farms to see how their chickens are doing
 
2021-07-21 9:44:40 PM  

Excelsior: meanmutton: Lsherm: "Getting gasoline superusers into [electric vehicles] as quickly as possible is critical to hitting our climate goals because they consume a third of U.S. gasoline," said Matthew Metz, the lead author of the report and founder and co-executive director of Coltura.

I used to be a "gasoline superuser" - my office was 99 miles from my house. Electric cars will not be a cheap enough option for people who need to travel long distances on a daily basis, even in a best case scenario where they get a full eight hours of charging while they are at work. Tesla's supercharger network is concentrated in some cities but largely ignores rural areas. I'd imagine the other class of super users are traveling salesmen or traveling support types that drive an extensive amount of miles per day.

The people the study talks about are the hardest people to get into electric cars because they are most likely to live in areas that don't have the infrastructure for it or the income to support the premium on the cars. Yeah, you'll save money on gas, but a used Model3 still costs $45K and you have to find all that money up front. It's never going to replace a $3000 shiatbox with a small I4 and a 10 gallon gas tank.

A Model 3 will charge from empty to full in 8.5 hours with a 7.5 kW charger. If you are driving 300+ miles each way to and from work, you can easily charge to full at work and overnight. If you're only driving 99 miles each way, you don't even need to bother with charging at work - just plug it in when you get home just like you do with your cell phone.

As far as cost, Tesla isn't the only option out there.. First dealer that came up on a Google search has a cetified used 2020 Bolt with 8,000 miles for under $25k with all the usual financing options. That one gets you 260 miles per charge

Sure -- as long as it still has the new-car fresh-from-the-factory smell, has one <100lbs driver and no passengers or cargo, and you never turn on the A/C or heater, and it's neither cold not hot outside.

Otherwise, "your mileage may vary".

Greatly. But somehow never in your favor.


Also, don't be anywhere winter is. You'll lose half the rated mileage if the temperature is less than freezing.

Tesla couldn't guarantee me the range in Ohio, so I just stuck with my 20 year old Civic with a third of a million miles on it.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 
2021-07-21 9:46:03 PM  
Actually, that 10% uses 33% sounds common to many resources. Medical care, wealth, tobacco and other drugs. For gasoline, you might get the 10% that uses 3% without even more electrics.
 
2021-07-21 9:46:11 PM  
This is the same with every commodity.
 
2021-07-21 9:47:01 PM  

SplittingAces: waxbeans: SplittingAces: When the U.S. gets a reliable electric grid that can handle this sea change in a car dependent culture, let me know.

Right now, our power grid can't keep people safe in their own homes with the slightest "extremes" in temperature norms.

That's not a design flaw that's a built-in feature.
Thanks Ronald Reagan

The deregulation really took hold with Deaukmajian (sp?) and Pete Wilson. CA between 89 and 95 was just a preview of what TX and FL are now.


Sure.
/
But Republicans did in fact pioneer this idea of getting into office and then making the government not function and then running on a platform of saying we need less government because government doesn't work
 
2021-07-21 9:47:23 PM  

waxbeans: Yeah let's just gloss over that it really should be against the law to have a long commute.


White people make minorities live in ever further-out areas to come service them. Good luck with that.
 
2021-07-21 9:48:20 PM  

Abox: waxbeans: /
Yeah let's just gloss over that it really should be against the law to have a long commute.


//
Spent my life knowing a dipshiat that lives in one city and commutes every day into another city to run his business and so do all his family and extended family.
I get it it's nice to have nice little cheap piece of property and build a extremely beautiful house on it and enjoy the lower cost of living of the one like town and make big bucks in the city.
It's all very smart but it's destroying the environment you pieces of shiat

What a pointless thing to get upset about.


??????
Approximately 20 people commuting from one city to another city simply to enjoy the price difference at the expense of the environment!
No. That's exactly the problem.
 
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