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(Ars Technica)   July 21, 1961: Gus Grissom flies on America's second space mission, Liberty Bell 7. Enjoy this deep dive into the mission which ended with the spacecraft taking a literal deep dive to Davy Jones' locker   (arstechnica.com) divider line
    More: Awkward, Project Mercury, Gus Grissom, NASA, Mercury Seven, small Mercury capsule, NASA history, history books, America's first human flight  
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252 clicks; posted to STEM » on 21 Jul 2021 at 6:38 AM (11 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-07-21 6:43:54 AM  
"More than half a century later, Grissom's name has faded from memory..."

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When did writers for ArsTechnica reach Cracked or Buzzfeed levels of stupid?
 
2021-07-21 7:16:12 AM  
The Discovery Channel show on finding the Liberty Bell 7 was when I knew that the discovery channel was done as a legitimate educational TV network. Instead of educating the viewer about the spacecraft or technology to find it, the show was mostly bullshiat drama regarding the search the team.
 
2021-07-21 7:46:02 AM  

Dick Gozinya: "More than half a century later, Grissom's name has faded from memory..."

[Fark user image 215x234]

When did writers for ArsTechnica reach Cracked or Buzzfeed levels of stupid?


Unless someone is a space geek or old enough to remember the events, the odds are that they don't know who Gus was. So yes, his name has faded.
 
2021-07-21 8:16:37 AM  
And in the age of New Space companies, it's not just NASA looking to the sea. Due to weight considerations, SpaceX has decided to return its crew Dragon capsule from the International Space Station via the ocean.

I thought that SpaceX wanted to do dry landings and NASA told them "Nope, water landings.  Deal with it"
 
2021-07-21 9:30:08 AM  

Dick Gozinya: "More than half a century later, Grissom's name has faded from memory..."

[Fark user image 215x234]

When did writers for ArsTechnica reach Cracked or Buzzfeed levels of stupid?


For over a decade now, much of the content of these sites has been written by twenty-somethings who assume that if something is new to them personally, it must be new to everybody. It's a kind of infantile mindset; most people grow out of it by about the age of four or five, those that don't go on to become writers for websites.


Hence the old joke:

Gen X: Hey, did you know Paul McCartney was in a band before Wings?

Millennials: Hey, did you know Paul McCartney was in a band?

Gen Z: Who's Paul McCartney?
 
2021-07-21 10:09:56 AM  

scanman61: And in the age of New Space companies, it's not just NASA looking to the sea. Due to weight considerations, SpaceX has decided to return its crew Dragon capsule from the International Space Station via the ocean.

I thought that SpaceX wanted to do dry landings and NASA told them "Nope, water landings.  Deal with it"


Maybe on an upcoming CRS mission, SpaceX can position one of their recovery drone ships and attempt a propulsive landing of the (uncrewed) capsule.  Any concerns NASA has about safety would be made irrelevant if it were done well away from the coast, no one aboard, and after the mission NASA paid for had been accomplished.

Perhaps before attempting a propulsive landing on the drone ship, they could attempt a propulsive landing on the water.

Hell, they could start out doing tests with suborbital flights - they'd only need to fly high enough for the capsule to reach terminal velocity before firing its thrusters.
 
2021-07-21 11:11:14 AM  

scanman61: And in the age of New Space companies, it's not just NASA looking to the sea. Due to weight considerations, SpaceX has decided to return its crew Dragon capsule from the International Space Station via the ocean.

I thought that SpaceX wanted to do dry landings and NASA told them "Nope, water landings.  Deal with it"


You would be correct.  The author has his head up his Ars.
 
2021-07-21 11:21:56 AM  

wage0048: scanman61: And in the age of New Space companies, it's not just NASA looking to the sea. Due to weight considerations, SpaceX has decided to return its crew Dragon capsule from the International Space Station via the ocean.

I thought that SpaceX wanted to do dry landings and NASA told them "Nope, water landings.  Deal with it"

Maybe on an upcoming CRS mission, SpaceX can position one of their recovery drone ships and attempt a propulsive landing of the (uncrewed) capsule.  Any concerns NASA has about safety would be made irrelevant if it were done well away from the coast, no one aboard, and after the mission NASA paid for had been accomplished.

Perhaps before attempting a propulsive landing on the drone ship, they could attempt a propulsive landing on the water.

Hell, they could start out doing tests with suborbital flights - they'd only need to fly high enough for the capsule to reach terminal velocity before firing its thrusters.


At this point, they would have to reengineer the capsule and rewrite the software to enable retropropulsive landings.

Given that the Dragon series is only a temporary stopgap on the way to Starship, that would definitely not be worth the time, effort, and expense.

SpaceX chooses its battles carefully.  Pissing off the government by making a fuss on this is even less helpful while they're dealing with the FAA talking about making them tear down the Starship / Superheavy Orbital Launch Tower in Boca Chica.
 
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