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(ZDNet)   Microsoft to Linus Torvalds: I wanna have your abortion   (zdnet.com) divider line
    More: Unlikely, Red Hat, MS-Linux, Fedora, Linux distribution, needs of cloud, RPM Package Manager, Red Hat Linux, Debian  
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1461 clicks; posted to STEM » on 16 Jul 2021 at 2:10 PM (44 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



Voting Results (Funniest)
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2021-07-16 1:53:08 PM  
12 votes:
MSsystemd
 
2021-07-16 2:31:08 PM  
8 votes:

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: MSsystemd


images-wixmp-ed30a86b8c4ca887773594c2.wixmp.comView Full Size


AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!

You bastard, I will not be able to sleep tonight as my brain tries and fails to process the mindf*ck that MSSystemD would be.
 
2021-07-16 2:59:04 PM  
8 votes:
i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2021-07-16 3:34:57 PM  
5 votes:
Say hi to Microsoft's own Linux: CBL-Mariner

No. And you can't make me.
 
2021-07-16 4:26:10 PM  
5 votes:
Linux_yes has been suspiciously absent in these threads. And this is the second in two days.

Either he's died or that guy is Linux_yes.

Quick, someone do a ctrl-f in the article for 'Librem'
 
2021-07-16 2:01:07 PM  
4 votes:
Still couldn't refuse the passive-biatchy final sentence just because, could you Stevie?

So, if you want a secure, stable Linux for your edge computing or container needs, I suggest -- in all seriousness -- you give CBL-Mariner a try. While I continue to have my doubts about Windows as a serious operating system, Microsoft did a fine job of creating a solid Linux. Who would have guessed!
 
2021-07-16 2:58:06 PM  
2 votes:
Oh, and (FTFA):
"Microsoft did a fine job of creating a solid Linux. Who would have guessed!"

Bit late to the party, aren't they? But then...combining "Microsoft" and "solid" must have taken a while...
 
2021-07-16 2:10:38 PM  
1 vote:
One more time with feeling, listen to yours truly and Linus Torvalds, Microsoft is no longer Linux's enemy. The enemy of AWS and Google? You bet. But, Linux no.

I think I'll continue to try to avoid MS as best I can. They've proven countless times they cannot be trusted.
 
2021-07-16 2:55:25 PM  
1 vote:
I think I'll stick with Linux Mint, if it's all the same to you.

My experience with Microsoft product quality has not been...encouraging.
 
2021-07-16 3:39:37 PM  
1 vote:
I haven't been a programmer in ages so this complaint may be waaay out-of-date, but every unix-based system I ever tried all had a slight lag between hitting a key and seeing the output on the screen. No matter what nice level I tried. No commercial  OS aimed at paying users would have a market with that. Toward the end of my career, in my office I had 3 or 4 scavenged PCs each running a variety of unix and my official dedicated work PC. I quit futzing around with unix when nothing I did mattered to the interface response time.
 
2021-07-16 6:39:25 PM  
1 vote:

yakmans_dad: I haven't been a programmer in ages so this complaint may be waaay out-of-date, but every unix-based system I ever tried all had a slight lag between hitting a key and seeing the output on the screen. No matter what nice level I tried. No commercial  OS aimed at paying users would have a market with that. Toward the end of my career, in my office I had 3 or 4 scavenged PCs each running a variety of unix and my official dedicated work PC. I quit futzing around with unix when nothing I did mattered to the interface response time.


They have GUIs now. Clicks instead of keys...mostly.
And the performance is equal to what you get on a Windows machine. Perhaps even better, because Linux is built by nerds, for nerds.
 
2021-07-16 8:52:41 PM  
1 vote:

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: MSsystemd


Being Microsoft, I'd expect it to be called something like "IntelliActiveDirectSystemdX"

/Or does SystemD come with systemd-bluescreend?
 
2021-07-17 6:25:54 AM  
1 vote:

Flowery Twats: They have GUIs now. Clicks instead of keys...mostly.
And the performance is equal to what you get on a Windows machine. Perhaps even better, because Linux is built by nerds, for nerds.


As someone who's been trying out Linux for the first time in about a decade, "built by nerds, for nerds" still seems to be its biggest problem.

For the most part, I've been seriously unimpressed.  Yes, the GUI interface is far more polished than I recall, and I would have to assume that the available software has both increased and improved.  Performance also seems to be snappier than Windows.  I've installed three different variations (Ubuntu, Zorin, and now Mint) on an old Asus Vivomini that was previously running Windows 8.x, and it runs faster with Linux while taking up far less disk space than Windows (and each version of Linux installed in a matter of minutes).  That's pretty much the extent of the pros.

The cons?  Well, when you Google how to do something, I typically found plenty of pages with the answer, but they still frequently say something like, "It's simple.  Open a terminal window and then type in...", and that something is a long, cryptic command.  Now, I'm not averse to typing in commands.  I've been on computers since the DOS 2.x days, and even now spend a good chunk of my work days in a Win 10 command prompt because, for some things, I find it much easier to do stuff that way.  When I write little programs that only I'll use, I still write them as command prompt versions instead of setting up forms and buttons, simply because it's faster.  But if one of the goals of Linux is to be a free desktop OS that everyone can use, as I've seen people say many times, they really need to make almost everything doable from within the GUI.  Expecting the average computer user, which these days is a Windows user, to learn a bunch of Linux commands when they don't have to learn DOS commands in Windows, will always keep Linux as a second-rate OS.

The reason why I setup a Linux machine is because my firm will eventually force me into Win 11, even though I work remotely 100% of the time (I'm on Win 10 for that reason, my old Win 7 machine was locked out of the network).  I've seen the previews of Win 11 and really have no desire for that.  I setup the Linux machine and installed OpenConnect, since I use Cisco AnyConnect on my Windows machine for VPNing to my firm.  Once it was installed, it was nowhere to be found.  No shortcut on the desktop (as Cisco does), no entry in the software menu (as Cisco does in the Start Menu).  I had to Google how to use OpenConnect and found that you have to go into Settings, look for the Network configuration, hit the "+" button to setup a new connection, and then configure your AnyConnect VPN.  That, quite frankly, is bullsh*t.  Assuming, of course, that the people who develop the various versions of Linux (and its applications) ever want Linux to be known as something other than "built by nerds, for nerds."

Now, I have no doubt I'll figure out all of this.  I've figured out every other thing I've ever needed to do on a PC for more than 30 years, long before the days when you could Google for help.  As I stated at the top, though, I'm seriously unimpressed.
 
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