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(USA Today)   Not News: Republicans oppose teaching uncomfortable parts of American history, and would forbid teaching about civil disobedience at all (like the Boston Tea Party or the American Revolution). Article is from 2014, long before we'd heard about CRT   (usatoday.com) divider line
    More: Vintage, Right-wing politics, Conservatism, Political spectrum, United States, Liberalism, Rights, Far right, French Revolution  
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632 clicks; posted to Politics » on 14 Jul 2021 at 4:04 PM (2 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-07-14 2:15:57 PM  
Racism worked so well getting Trump elected I suspect it's why CRT is now being waved around everywhere.
 
2021-07-14 2:23:28 PM  
They want to teach propaganda, not history.
 
2021-07-14 2:32:27 PM  
This is not a new thing. CRT is just the boogeyman.

And it's a war that has been waged for decades. Textbooks have been a sensitive subject since I was in school. Passing muster in Texas, and extraordinarily Conservative review boards, meant companies had access to millions of students. Don't get past the Texas textbook review board? Your SOL for those dollars. This is something that textbook authors and their publishing companies understood and catered to.

And it's NOT an accident that things like civics and critical thinking, and glossing over portions of history that...well, might paint authority and white folks in general in a less than salutatory light  all went out the window.

CRT is just more shrill right now, because it's getting more desperate. The last Census was skewed, and it's why the GOP threw so much effort to support Donnie until the bitter end, because that skewed Census will be the basis for drawing up districts for a decade. The black, brown, red and all the other colors of the rainbow people realize how close they are in parity, if not majority in many districts, then voting could take a turn. Which, we saw this last go around, and is fueling the new voter suppression laws.

The GOP understands the disparity, and that white folks are about to slip under 50% in this country, likely before the end of this decade. And they are terrified of it, because they KNOW that they can only count on a few minority communities for support, and they are shedding white voters--especially women--and that is NOT the demographic whose wrath they want to face. CRT gives an excuse to try to keep understanding out of the education process, and the wrongs that were committed in our names to keep fairly racist bullsh*t alive. From slavery, to the Trail of Tears, to the Chinese Exclusion Act, to Tulsa and a whole LOT of lynchings, to the Internment, the Zoot Suit Riots, and far more. Downplaying or demephasizing even something as bullsh*t as HUAC, is how the GOP has felt that it has protected itself from history, by literally rewriting it. And focusing on school boards for decades now. If the kids don't learn how bullsh*t things have been, how can they make informed decisions? They can't, so they go with feelings. They go with 'their gut' instead of facts. It's an intellectual environment that gives them an edge on those hoity-toity East Coast Elites, and plays in with the Brave Pioneer/Stolid Independent motif that folks like to portray the further you get into the states that used to be territories and who built their own mythos on their founding.

This is just a current battle in a war for classrooms that has been going on since before I got into a teaching program.
 
2021-07-14 4:09:52 PM  
I am sure it was not called "critical race theory" when I was in school, but we learned about slavery and the treatment of slaves and it was fairly obvious that life was unfair/awful/etc for those that were slaves (and even those that weren't) and that black people were treated unfairly in society as a whole.

Is this just simply a "messaging" war or that that rapeublicans don't want kids to learn about the horrid past of the US in general?

/I believe we even watched Glory which would probably be banned by rapepublicans
 
2021-07-14 4:11:45 PM  
no, I'm pretty sure that we had CRTs long before 2004. We were just starting to transition to flat-panel displays around then.
 
2021-07-14 4:11:58 PM  
So the REAL educational institutions that are indoctrinating our kids, are the schools stacked with conservative board members trying to rewrite history and push blatant propaganda.

Again.. everything is projection. Over, and over, and over, and over again.
 
2021-07-14 4:13:35 PM  

OhioUGrad: I am sure it was not called "critical race theory" when I was in school, but we learned about slavery and the treatment of slaves and it was fairly obvious that life was unfair/awful/etc for those that were slaves (and even those that weren't) and that black people were treated unfairly in society as a whole.

Is this just simply a "messaging" war or that that rapeublicans don't want kids to learn about the horrid past of the US in general?

/I believe we even watched Glory which would probably be banned by rapepublicans


That's the thing. They've been teaching all the awful shiat for DECADES, at least. Lots of people like to pile on as if history in the US is only presented as pilgrims and indians on thanksgiving and george washington mythos like it is in farking kindergarten. But now they got a buzzword, and the gullible will buy into any race baiting garbage propagated by conservative media.
 
2021-07-14 4:14:18 PM  

OhioUGrad: I am sure it was not called "critical race theory" when I was in school, but we learned about slavery and the treatment of slaves and it was fairly obvious that life was unfair/awful/etc for those that were slaves (and even those that weren't) and that black people were treated unfairly in society as a whole.

Is this just simply a "messaging" war or that that rapeublicans don't want kids to learn about the horrid past of the US in general?

/I believe we even watched Glory which would probably be banned by rapepublicans


Yes, teaching history often conflicts with the jingoism that they love so much.
 
2021-07-14 4:17:04 PM  
respect for authority and respect for individual rights
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-07-14 4:18:40 PM  

OhioUGrad: I am sure it was not called "critical race theory" when I was in school, but we learned about slavery and the treatment of slaves and it was fairly obvious that life was unfair/awful/etc for those that were slaves (and even those that weren't) and that black people were treated unfairly in society as a whole.

Is this just simply a "messaging" war or that that rapeublicans don't want kids to learn about the horrid past of the US in general?

/I believe we even watched Glory which would probably be banned by rapepublicans


We did, too. Given the demographics of my school district (vast majority Black, by a wide margin), we took that shiat seriously.  8th Grade US history class teacher had us watch Roots, Glory (the movie about the Massachusetts Black Regiment under Colonel Shaw), The Color Purple, and a host of other movies that, for the early-mid 90s didn't pull punches on the black experience in America/American History.

We also spent a lot of time covering MLK and Malcolm X in-depth, the civil rights movement, and so on.  In fact, the same teacher organized a class trip to Boston to walk the Black History trail (i think it's called, it's been a loooooong time) and visit a lot of the black history museums and stuff.

I can tell you that the whole experience was both brutal in terms of not censoring or pulling any punches and showing just how horrible shiat was/still is, and eye-opening as a young white kid getting a crash course in the whole history and experience that they don't really teach anywhere else (at least at the middle school/high school level, IME).

Honestly, I think white kids should definitely be exposed to all of it, and should get a real, honest account of the past as it was, not as it was whitewashed.
 
2021-07-14 4:21:35 PM  
Duh!

The Tea Party is calculated conservative astroturf that deliberately, misleadingly focuses on the tax not that the tax choked out all information sharing in the era. Nope. It was The Stamp Act. The didn't like to name the tax because that would imply that taxes could be good or inspire the evil amongst them to aggressively tax people they don't like to punish them (as The Stamp Act did).

The Tea Party Republicans watered down history into homeopathic anti American tax cut baloney and I could never swallow it.

It's reasonable to destroy the luxury toys of people who break your postal system, this is the Boston Tea Party.

It's not storming the Capitol because Biden would let Liz Warren go after the billionaire bandits that astroturfed The Tea Party.

It should've been ant monds in golf courses, grass killer....you know when Gooest BeachToy and Mon Auld Slump go golfing.

Eh forget it Jake, the counterterrorism laws erase enough all on their own, isn't that enough.
 
2021-07-14 4:27:51 PM  

Safari Ken: OhioUGrad: I am sure it was not called "critical race theory" when I was in school, but we learned about slavery and the treatment of slaves and it was fairly obvious that life was unfair/awful/etc for those that were slaves (and even those that weren't) and that black people were treated unfairly in society as a whole.

Is this just simply a "messaging" war or that that rapeublicans don't want kids to learn about the horrid past of the US in general?

/I believe we even watched Glory which would probably be banned by rapepublicans

Yes, teaching history often conflicts with the jingoism that they love so much.


On the other hand, learning about all of history, and not just the selected parts that play into the Mystique, introduces us to a whole host of brilliant, brave, and intelligent people who did great things, flaws and all.  And, overall, it demonstrates the struggle and the ceaseless hope and desire of those people to things better, to be better, and to grow both as a society and as a nation.

It paints a very clear picture of just how hard those people fought, what they sacrificed, and the absolutely brutal challenges they had to overcome.

It makes me proud that as flawed as they were, even our founding fathers thought enough of the future to try and leave a legacy that favored being that better society and not allowing tyrants to destroy everything.

It makes me hopeful that we as a nation can overcome and embrace the same spirit of defiance and willingness to fight (figuratively and hopefully not literally, but even literally if it comes to that), driving back assholes like Trump and his ilk the same way we threw off the British.

And, it makes me, personally, want to do better and be better to try and live up to the ideals of our forefathers, and what the American Dream could be.

/I'm sleep deprived, so this may or may not be more delusional than I think it is.
//Seriously, though, there's so much good in our history and so much value from seeing, embracing, and learning from the bad, that editing out the parts we don't like is just plain stupid.
 
2021-07-14 4:28:05 PM  
republicans hate non whites.
 
2021-07-14 4:28:39 PM  
2014?  LOL!

Older and more busted:

Lynne Cheney, "The End of History," Wall Street Journal (Oct. 20, 1994)

The general drift of the document becomes apparent when one realizes that not a single one of the 31 standards mentions the Constitution. True, it does come up in the 250 pages of supporting materials. It is even described as "the culmination of the most creative era of constitutionalism in American history" -- but only in the dependent clause of a sentence that has as its main point that students should "ponder the paradox that the Constitution sidetracked the movement to abolish slavery that had taken rise in the revolutionary era."
The authors tend to save their unqualified admiration for people, places and events that are politically correct. The first era, "Three Worlds Meet (Beginnings to 1620)," covers societies in the Americas, Western Europe and West Africa that began to interact significantly after 1450. To understand West Africa, students are encouraged to "analyze the achievements and grandeur of Mansa Musa's court, and the social customs and wealth of the kingdom of Mali."

Such celebratory prose is rare when the document gets to American history itself. In the U.S. context, the kind of wealth that Mansa Musa commanded is not considered a good thing. When the subject of John D. Rockefeller comes up, students are instructed to conduct a trial in which he is accused of "knowingly and willfully participat{ing} in unethical and amoral business practices designed to undermine traditions of fair open competition for personal and private aggrandizement in direct violation of the common welfare."

African and Native American societies, like all societies, had their failings, but one would hardly know it from National Standards. Students are encouraged to consider Aztec "architecture, skills, labor systems, and agriculture." But not the practice of human sacrifice.

Counting how many times different subjects are mentioned in the document yields telling results. One of the most often mentioned subjects, with 19 references, is McCarthy and McCarthyism. The Ku Klux Klan gets its fair share, too, with 17. As for individuals, Harriet Tubman, an African-American who helped rescue slaves by way of the underground railroad, is mentioned six times. Two white males who were contemporaries of Tubman, Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee, get one and zero mentions, respectively. Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein, Jonas Salk and the Wright brothers make no appearance at all.

I have abundant reason to be troubled by the way that the history standards have turned out. When I was chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, I signed a grant that helped enable their development. In 1992, the NEH put $525,000 and the Department of Education $865,000 toward establishing standards for what students should know about both U.S. and world history. The grantee was the National Center for History in the Schools at UCLA, an organization that had produced some fine work, including a highly regarded publication called "Lessons From History" that was also an effort to set standards for the teaching of history. It was this publication, the Center for History said in its application, upon which the government-sponsored standard-setting effort would build.

But a comparison of "Lessons From History" with the National Standards shows only a distant relationship between the two. "Lessons," while rightfully including important Americans, like Sojourner Truth, who have been ignored in the past, also emphasizes major figures like George Washington, who is not only described as our first president but even pictured, as is Robert E. Lee.

"Lessons" emphasizes the individual greatness that has flourished within our political system and in our representative institutions. It refers -- twice -- to "congressional giants" like Henry Clay and Daniel Webster and the "great debates" in which they participated. The National Standards, which mentions Clay once and Webster not at all, gives no hint of their spellbinding oratory. It does, however, suggest that students analyze Pat Buchanan's speech at the 1992 Republican convention [Probably not in the original German. --HOC*]. The only congressional leader I could find actually quoted in the document was Tip O'Neill, calling Ronald Reagan "a cheerleader for selfishness."

What went wrong? One member of the National Council for History Standards (the group that oversaw the drafting of the standards) says that the 1992 presidential election unleashed the forces of political correctness. According to this person, who wishes not to be named, those who were "pursuing the revisionist agenda" no longer bothered to conceal their "great hatred for traditional history." Various political groups, such as African-American organizations and Native American groups, also complained about what they saw as omissions and distortions. As a result, says the council member, "nobody dared to cut the inclusive part," and what got left out was traditional history.

The standards for world history are also soon to be made public. By all accounts, the sessions leading to their development were even more contentious than those that produced U.S. standards. The main battle was over the emphasis that would be given to Western civilization, says a second council member. After the 1992 election, this member reports, the American Historical Association, an academic organization, became particularly aggressive in its opposition to "privileging" the West. The AHA threatened to boycott the proceedings if Western civilization was given any emphasis. From that point on, says the second council member, "the AHA hijacked standards-setting." Several council members fervently protested the diminution of the West, "but," says the second council member, "we were all iced-out."


Mrs. Cheney, who was chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities from May 1986 to January 1993, is a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mlassit​e/discussions261/cheney.html


/Gosh, why is it so darned important for a member of the Party of Lincoln to make sure that school kids learn about Robert E. Lee?

*Okay, I stole that, probably from Molly Ivins.
 
2021-07-14 4:32:22 PM  
African and Native American societies, like all societies, had their failings, but one would hardly know it from National Standards. Students are encouraged to consider Aztec "architecture, skills, labor systems, and agriculture." But not the practice of human sacrifice.


"Only learn about the Disney stuff kids! That way, you are easier to manipulate into believing nazi republicans when they cry that their freedumbz are being attacked!"

Fark these GOP twats with a rusty steak knife
 
2021-07-14 4:33:22 PM  

Purple_Urkle: Duh!

The Tea Party is calculated conservative astroturf that deliberately, misleadingly focuses on the tax not that the tax choked out all information sharing in the era. Nope. It was The Stamp Act. The didn't like to name the tax because that would imply that taxes could be good or inspire the evil amongst them to aggressively tax people they don't like to punish them (as The Stamp Act did).

The Tea Party Republicans watered down history into homeopathic anti American tax cut baloney and I could never swallow it.

It's reasonable to destroy the luxury toys of people who break your postal system, this is the Boston Tea Party.

It's not storming the Capitol because Biden would let Liz Warren go after the billionaire bandits that astroturfed The Tea Party.

It should've been ant monds in golf courses, grass killer....you know when Gooest BeachToy and Mon Auld Slump go golfing.

Eh forget it Jake, the counterterrorism laws erase enough all on their own, isn't that enough.


The TEA party was about as genuine as the 'grass roots' protests here in MI back at the start of COVID, what with all that "Grass roots" funding from the DeVoss foundation, bussed-in assholes, and deliberate shiat-stirring...

I'd be willing to bet good money that if we put enough effort into it, we'd find that most of these groups were also organized at least partly by foreign bad actors and interests that wanted to destabilize the US government.
 
2021-07-14 4:43:03 PM  
I am not sure what great I would get in history with the new rules going forward. I do know the class would be easy and any tests/homework a breeze to complete with the new standards.

Class begins and the teachers starts the lesson on WW2.

Student interrupts the teacher "Teacher, I feel it is wrong to not point out both sides in the so called "Holocaust". Governor Abbot and the Texas legislature want to ensure both sides are presented in a good light. Can you please enlighten us on what the benefits were by the people targeted by the government of Nazi Germany based on their ethnicity, religion, political beliefs, or sexual orientation. What points have conservatives in Texas made for that to be a good thing?"
 
2021-07-14 4:44:09 PM  

HighOnCraic: Lynne Cheney, "The End of History," Wall Street Journal (Oct. 20, 1994)

The general drift of the document becomes apparent when one realizes that not a single one of the 31 standards mentions the Constitution. True, it does come up in the 250 pages of supporting materials. It is even described as "the culmination of the most creative era of constitutionalism in American history" -- but only in the dependent clause of a sentence that has as its main point that students should "ponder the paradox that the Constitution sidetracked the movement to abolish slavery that had taken rise in the revolutionary era."


I forget who it was (my memory says it was a dude named Thomas; not Jefferson) who wrote in 1789ish about the irony of the Constitution establishing "freedom for all" while happily going along with human enslavement.

Suffice to say that it wasn't even a new idea THEN that this great experiment in freedom had some glaring flaws baked in.

// and what, in Dick Cheney's wife's mind, was the Constitution's Article 1 Section 9 all about if not to sidetrack the debate over the legality of human enslavement for another 20 years?
 
2021-07-14 4:49:29 PM  
We had a couple of Fark thread about it at the time.  I'd link them if I could find them.
 
2021-07-14 4:49:58 PM  
Alls I know is that workers were brought here to help the poor white farmers, who treated those workers like family, and better than how they would've been treated had they been afforded rights they couldn't possibly understand.
Alls I know is that FDR brought the braceros so all illegal Mexicans from all over South America are the Democrat Parties fault.
Alls I know is that the Founding Fathers meant for us to have guns to stave off waves of illegals.
Alls I know is that Carter lost Vietnam on purpose and Reagan spent 8 years cleaning up his mess and making America great again.
The Bush boys did the same, minus those lousy Clinton years (so much depression, look it up) where it was all bjs and murdering Ron Brown and Vince Foster to cover up the scandalous Whitewater, which Killary has never fully explained.
Then Obama tried to turn us all socialist. Nice try, Obummer. Trump fixed all that.
 
2021-07-14 4:50:06 PM  

Kit Fister: OhioUGrad: I am sure it was not called "critical race theory" when I was in school, but we learned about slavery and the treatment of slaves and it was fairly obvious that life was unfair/awful/etc for those that were slaves (and even those that weren't) and that black people were treated unfairly in society as a whole.

Is this just simply a "messaging" war or that that rapeublicans don't want kids to learn about the horrid past of the US in general?

/I believe we even watched Glory which would probably be banned by rapepublicans

We did, too. Given the demographics of my school district (vast majority Black, by a wide margin), we took that shiat seriously.  8th Grade US history class teacher had us watch Roots, Glory (the movie about the Massachusetts Black Regiment under Colonel Shaw), The Color Purple, and a host of other movies that, for the early-mid 90s didn't pull punches on the black experience in America/American History.

We also spent a lot of time covering MLK and Malcolm X in-depth, the civil rights movement, and so on.  In fact, the same teacher organized a class trip to Boston to walk the Black History trail (i think it's called, it's been a loooooong time) and visit a lot of the black history museums and stuff.

I can tell you that the whole experience was both brutal in terms of not censoring or pulling any punches and showing just how horrible shiat was/still is, and eye-opening as a young white kid getting a crash course in the whole history and experience that they don't really teach anywhere else (at least at the middle school/high school level, IME).

Honestly, I think white kids should definitely be exposed to all of it, and should get a real, honest account of the past as it was, not as it was whitewashed.


My district (huge majority-white probably 97%) learned it all (though ours didn't go as far as yours did). It was eye-opening and everyone should learn about it in a factually based way.
 
2021-07-14 4:54:47 PM  
So "Critical" as in Critial Thinking skills terrifies the GOP.  They could just legislate that Critical Thinking can damage their voter base and deserves to be taken out of teacher's lists of life skills.  A fine of $5000 per student per instance should be just fine, unless the teachers unions hears about this.
 
2021-07-14 5:02:09 PM  
 
2021-07-14 5:22:06 PM  
The American Revolution was not civil disobedience.

Neither was the Civil War.
 
2021-07-14 5:36:15 PM  

Dr Dreidel: HighOnCraic: Lynne Cheney, "The End of History," Wall Street Journal (Oct. 20, 1994)

The general drift of the document becomes apparent when one realizes that not a single one of the 31 standards mentions the Constitution. True, it does come up in the 250 pages of supporting materials. It is even described as "the culmination of the most creative era of constitutionalism in American history" -- but only in the dependent clause of a sentence that has as its main point that students should "ponder the paradox that the Constitution sidetracked the movement to abolish slavery that had taken rise in the revolutionary era."

I forget who it was (my memory says it was a dude named Thomas; not Jefferson) who wrote in 1789ish about the irony of the Constitution establishing "freedom for all" while happily going along with human enslavement.

Suffice to say that it wasn't even a new idea THEN that this great experiment in freedom had some glaring flaws baked in.

// and what, in Dick Cheney's wife's mind, was the Constitution's Article 1 Section 9 all about if not to sidetrack the debate over the legality of human enslavement for another 20 years?


Even before 1789:

"Slavery is now no where more patiently endured, than in countries once inhabited by the zealots of liberty."

--Samuel Johnson: Idler #11 (June 24, 1758)

"How is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of negroes?"

--Samuel Johnson: Taxation No Tyranny (1775)

"Enough is enough!  I have had it with these motherfarkin' slaves on this motherfarkin' plane!"

--Samuel L. Johnson, 1776, during the time when the Continental Army took over the airports


See also:

Quakers Address the Problem of Slavery
https://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/dis​p​_textbook.cfm?smtID=3&psid=147
 
2021-07-14 5:57:14 PM  
[shrug]

The newer problem is that some people don't just want to eliminate the old mythology, they want to replace it with a new mythology.

Then there are the ones who claim to want to look at history warts and all; but only if the warts have a nice coating of paint. Or the ones who want to magnify all the bad parts of the bad people, but disregard the bad parts of the good people.

If you want to pretend white people are the root source of evil everywhere and reinvent the Myth of the Noble Savage, just admit that's what you're doing and be done with it.
 
2021-07-14 6:11:18 PM  
I'm pitching a 23 minute documentary to OAN and the GOP about how black people in Africa between 1600 and 1800 competed to be allowed on the ships to the new world.  They all wanted to be slaves, little known fact.  And that's why they're so good at sports and music.

//seriously, read "The Bell Curve", it's that stupid.
 
2021-07-14 6:13:08 PM  

Gyrfalcon: [shrug]

The newer problem is that some people don't just want to eliminate the old mythology, they want to replace it with a new mythology.

Then there are the ones who claim to want to look at history warts and all; but only if the warts have a nice coating of paint. Or the ones who want to magnify all the bad parts of the bad people, but disregard the bad parts of the good people.

If you want to pretend white people are the root source of evil everywhere and reinvent the Myth of the Noble Savage, just admit that's what you're doing and be done with it.


Damn.  And I liked you... damn.
 
2021-07-14 6:48:26 PM  

hubiestubert: This is not a new thing. CRT is just the boogeyman.

And it's a war that has been waged for decades. Textbooks have been a sensitive subject since I was in school. Passing muster in Texas, and extraordinarily Conservative review boards, meant companies had access to millions of students. Don't get past the Texas textbook review board? Your SOL for those dollars. This is something that textbook authors and their publishing companies understood and catered to.

And it's NOT an accident that things like civics and critical thinking, and glossing over portions of history that...well, might paint authority and white folks in general in a less than salutatory light  all went out the window.

CRT is just more shrill right now, because it's getting more desperate. The last Census was skewed, and it's why the GOP threw so much effort to support Donnie until the bitter end, because that skewed Census will be the basis for drawing up districts for a decade. The black, brown, red and all the other colors of the rainbow people realize how close they are in parity, if not majority in many districts, then voting could take a turn. Which, we saw this last go around, and is fueling the new voter suppression laws.

The GOP understands the disparity, and that white folks are about to slip under 50% in this country, likely before the end of this decade. And they are terrified of it, because they KNOW that they can only count on a few minority communities for support, and they are shedding white voters--especially women--and that is NOT the demographic whose wrath they want to face. CRT gives an excuse to try to keep understanding out of the education process, and the wrongs that were committed in our names to keep fairly racist bullsh*t alive. From slavery, to the Trail of Tears, to the Chinese Exclusion Act, to Tulsa and a whole LOT of lynchings, to the Internment, the Zoot Suit Riots, and far more. Downplaying or demephasizing even something as bullsh*t as HUAC, is how the GOP has fe ...


I wrote a book on Virginia history as an unpaid intern. You would not believe the amount of sugar-coating that went into that shiat. Basically if someone might find a discussion unpleasant, "they don't need to know that".

The really chilling thing was much of what I wasn't allowed to put in, I was excited about because I was learning it for the first time myself. Nat Turner was a motherfarkin' boss like a real-life Django and I think little black kids should get to hear about him. (I don't know how much to trust mainstream records of his rebellion being bloodthirsty killers of children)
 
2021-07-14 8:51:44 PM  

Subtonic: OhioUGrad: I am sure it was not called "critical race theory" when I was in school, but we learned about slavery and the treatment of slaves and it was fairly obvious that life was unfair/awful/etc for those that were slaves (and even those that weren't) and that black people were treated unfairly in society as a whole.

Is this just simply a "messaging" war or that that rapeublicans don't want kids to learn about the horrid past of the US in general?

/I believe we even watched Glory which would probably be banned by rapepublicans

That's the thing. They've been teaching all the awful shiat for DECADES, at least. Lots of people like to pile on as if history in the US is only presented as pilgrims and indians on thanksgiving and george washington mythos like it is in farking kindergarten. But now they got a buzzword, and the gullible will buy into any race baiting garbage propagated by conservative media.


Well, it's Republicans...they never learned a thing beyond first grade or so, and they never read anything more advanced than children's books.
 
2021-07-14 9:00:36 PM  

Aquapope: Gyrfalcon: [shrug]

The newer problem is that some people don't just want to eliminate the old mythology, they want to replace it with a new mythology.

Then there are the ones who claim to want to look at history warts and all; but only if the warts have a nice coating of paint. Or the ones who want to magnify all the bad parts of the bad people, but disregard the bad parts of the good people.

If you want to pretend white people are the root source of evil everywhere and reinvent the Myth of the Noble Savage, just admit that's what you're doing and be done with it.

Damn.  And I liked you... damn.


I swear I've noticed a fair number of old accounts that have posted not-infrequently over the years I've been here saying... uncharacteristic things over the past couple weeks.
 
2021-07-14 11:20:38 PM  
Hey, Union busting is a fun chapter. Workers killed for daring to work for 8 hour days and higher wages. Good stuff - kill the poor and other poor Americans will stop asking. We'll see what happens when we DON'T teach kids to think for themselves and tell them the US was always nice.
 
2021-07-15 4:52:13 AM  

IAmRight: Aquapope: Gyrfalcon: [shrug]

The newer problem is that some people don't just want to eliminate the old mythology, they want to replace it with a new mythology.

Then there are the ones who claim to want to look at history warts and all; but only if the warts have a nice coating of paint. Or the ones who want to magnify all the bad parts of the bad people, but disregard the bad parts of the good people.

If you want to pretend white people are the root source of evil everywhere and reinvent the Myth of the Noble Savage, just admit that's what you're doing and be done with it.

Damn.  And I liked you... damn.

I swear I've noticed a fair number of old accounts that have posted not-infrequently over the years I've been here saying... uncharacteristic things over the past couple weeks.


I've noticed that too and it doesn't just seem to go one way. A couple of long-time farkheads have started talking like they are decent people. I suspect trickery.
 
2021-07-15 7:16:39 AM  

Bandito King: IAmRight: Aquapope: Gyrfalcon: [shrug]

The newer problem is that some people don't just want to eliminate the old mythology, they want to replace it with a new mythology.

Then there are the ones who claim to want to look at history warts and all; but only if the warts have a nice coating of paint. Or the ones who want to magnify all the bad parts of the bad people, but disregard the bad parts of the good people.

If you want to pretend white people are the root source of evil everywhere and reinvent the Myth of the Noble Savage, just admit that's what you're doing and be done with it.

Damn.  And I liked you... damn.

I swear I've noticed a fair number of old accounts that have posted not-infrequently over the years I've been here saying... uncharacteristic things over the past couple weeks.

I've noticed that too and it doesn't just seem to go one way. A couple of long-time farkheads have started talking like they are decent people. I suspect trickery.


uncharacteristic things.

/what do I win?
 
2021-07-15 7:22:55 AM  

IAmRight: Aquapope: Gyrfalcon: [shrug]

The newer problem is that some people don't just want to eliminate the old mythology, they want to replace it with a new mythology.

Then there are the ones who claim to want to look at history warts and all; but only if the warts have a nice coating of paint. Or the ones who want to magnify all the bad parts of the bad people, but disregard the bad parts of the good people.

If you want to pretend white people are the root source of evil everywhere and reinvent the Myth of the Noble Savage, just admit that's what you're doing and be done with it.

Damn.  And I liked you... damn.

I swear I've noticed a fair number of old accounts that have posted not-infrequently over the years I've been here saying... uncharacteristic things over the past couple weeks.


people change, and so do the average accepted social positions. What was hardly out of place 10 years ago can now get you labeled as a fark head, or problematic, or whatever the word of the day is to describe someone who doesn't fit the current mold of socially acceptable. *shrug*

Social media and forums of all stripes only add to it because of the general amplification effect and tendency towards more outrageous/shiatty behavior that comes with anonymity and lack of real consequences.

so, yeah, nothing really surprises me around here anymore, things just always fit the overall trend of pseudo-tribal warfare that's always been, amplified.
 
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