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(History Channel)   On this day in history, in 1853, Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into Tokyo Bay, in what was his most famous role until the Friends reunion   (history.com) divider line
    More: Vintage, Japan, Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry, Japanese officials, Japanese government, Treaty of Kanagawa, foreign power, President Millard Fillmore, superior American ships  
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847 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Jul 2021 at 1:50 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-07-08 11:52:46 AM  
Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry, representing the U.S. government, sails into Tokyo Bay, Japan, with a squadron of four vessels. For a time, Japanese officials refused to speak with Perry, but under threat of attack by the superior American ships they accepted letters from President Millard Fillmore, making the United States the first Western nation to establish relations with Japan since it had been declared closed to foreigners two centuries before

And you wonder why no one in the old world trusts us.
 
2021-07-08 12:59:54 PM  

Merltech: Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry, representing the U.S. government, sails into Tokyo Bay, Japan, with a squadron of four vessels. For a time, Japanese officials refused to speak with Perry, but under threat of attack by the superior American ships they accepted letters from President Millard Fillmore, making the United States the first Western nation to establish relations with Japan since it had been declared closed to foreigners two centuries before

And you wonder why no one in the old world trusts us.


Don't need trust when you have guns, so, neener neener.

While I can't condone it, I am still amused by the balls it takes to have the conversation "You're going to be friends and trade with us." "Nah, we're good, thanks." *pulls gunbattleship cannon* "That wasn't a request."
 
2021-07-08 1:55:05 PM  
Could it BE anymore colonialist?
 
2021-07-08 1:55:55 PM  
Arguably, forcing Japan to modernize, accept foreign trade and eliminate the Shogunate put the United States on the path to the Second World War.
 
2021-07-08 1:56:11 PM  
In junior college speech class, I did a presentation on Commodore Matthew Perry and my opening slide had a picture of him alongside a picture of Chandler Bing with a big X across it.

That's all I have to contribute to this discussion.
 
2021-07-08 1:57:42 PM  
Can you see my nipples through this gunboat?
 
2021-07-08 2:01:21 PM  

disaster bastard: In junior college speech class, I did a presentation on Commodore Matthew Perry and my opening slide had a picture of him alongside a picture of Chandler Bing with a big X across it.

That's all I have to contribute to this discussion.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-07-08 2:02:24 PM  

Merltech: Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry, representing the U.S. government, sails into Tokyo Bay, Japan, with a squadron of four vessels. For a time, Japanese officials refused to speak with Perry, but under threat of attack by the superior American ships they accepted letters from President Millard Fillmore, making the United States the first Western nation to establish relations with Japan since it had been declared closed to foreigners two centuries before

And you wonder why no one in the old world trusts us.


Yeah the US is the only people to do this.
 
2021-07-08 2:02:47 PM  

Merltech: Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry, representing the U.S. government, sails into Tokyo Bay, Japan, with a squadron of four vessels. For a time, Japanese officials refused to speak with Perry, but under threat of attack by the superior American ships they accepted letters from President Millard Fillmore, making the United States the first Western nation to establish relations with Japan since it had been declared closed to foreigners two centuries before

And you wonder why no one in the old world trusts us.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-07-08 2:05:04 PM  

iheartscotch: Arguably, forcing Japan to modernize, accept foreign trade and eliminate the Shogunate put the United States on the path to the Second World War.


Then the US forced them to be modern capitalists.
Talk about shooting yourself in the foot.
 
2021-07-08 2:07:13 PM  

iheartscotch: Arguably, forcing Japan to modernize, accept foreign trade and eliminate the Shogunate put the United States on the path to the Second World War.


Also this:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-07-08 2:08:13 PM  

Merltech: Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry, representing the U.S. government, sails into Tokyo Bay, Japan, with a squadron of four vessels. For a time, Japanese officials refused to speak with Perry, but under threat of attack by the superior American ships they accepted letters from President Millard Fillmore, making the United States the first Western nation to establish relations with Japan since it had been declared closed to foreigners two centuries before

And you wonder why no one in the old world trusts us.


Europeans did that in Asia too.  Periodically bombarded their towns with naval artillery as well.
 
2021-07-08 2:09:13 PM  

iheartscotch: Arguably, forcing Japan to modernize, accept foreign trade and eliminate the Shogunate put the United States on the path to the Second World War.


Yeah, but we have PlayStations and anime as a result as well, so I'd say it's a fair trade.
 
2021-07-08 2:12:54 PM  

PirateKing: Could it BE anymore colonialist?


British: Hold my beer.
French: Hold my wine.
Dutch: Hold my.... Slave.
 
2021-07-08 2:15:16 PM  

NM Volunteer: Merltech: Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry, representing the U.S. government, sails into Tokyo Bay, Japan, with a squadron of four vessels. For a time, Japanese officials refused to speak with Perry, but under threat of attack by the superior American ships they accepted letters from President Millard Fillmore, making the United States the first Western nation to establish relations with Japan since it had been declared closed to foreigners two centuries before

And you wonder why no one in the old world trusts us.

Europeans did that in Asia too.  Periodically bombarded their towns with naval artillery as well.


And now we have to deal with Chinese bots brainwashing our hoi polloi.
 
2021-07-08 2:17:49 PM  

Merltech: Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry, representing the U.S. government, sails into Tokyo Bay, Japan, with a squadron of four vessels. For a time, Japanese officials refused to speak with Perry, but under threat of attack by the superior American ships they accepted letters from President Millard Fillmore, making the United States the first Western nation to establish relations with Japan since it had been declared closed to foreigners two centuries before

And you wonder why no one in the old world trusts us.


Millard Fillmore? What kind of name is that?

We have a sour history in both directions but USA and Japan are for better or for worse indelibly linked.
 
2021-07-08 2:18:06 PM  

iheartscotch: Arguably, forcing Japan to modernize, accept foreign trade and eliminate the Shogunate put the United States on the path to the Second World War.


Dan Carlin just wrapped his series around that thesis.
 
2021-07-08 2:20:06 PM  

Merltech: Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry, representing the U.S. government, sails into Tokyo Bay, Japan, with a squadron of four vessels. For a time, Japanese officials refused to speak with Perry, but under threat of attack by the superior American ships they accepted letters from President Millard Fillmore, making the United States the first Western nation to establish relations with Japan since it had been declared closed to foreigners two centuries before

And you wonder why no one in the old world trusts us.


Japan watched all the great western powers carve up China during an ahistorical period of significant decline.  They vowed to not let that happen to them.  They became an imperial power to not become subjugated by one.  And their own monster got away from them.
 
2021-07-08 2:29:19 PM  

mchaboud: PirateKing: Could it BE anymore colonialist?

British: Hold my beer.
French: Hold my wine.
Dutch: Hold my.... Slave.


So wrong ...

Yet so right
 
2021-07-08 2:31:07 PM  
I had a Commodore 64 growing up, but never a Commodore Matt Perry.
 
2021-07-08 2:35:44 PM  

iheartscotch: Arguably, forcing Japan to modernize, accept foreign trade and eliminate the Shogunate put the United States on the path to the Second World War.


Meanwhile, Ross was running up a hill in Georgia shouting, "Hi Yo, Silver!"
 
2021-07-08 2:47:39 PM  
Yeah but we got a lot of cool karate movies out of it.

I mean at this point who can even remember what all the "unpleasantness" was about?
 
2021-07-08 2:49:52 PM  
Open. The country.
STOP having it be closed.
 
2021-07-08 2:57:44 PM  

King Something: Open. The country.
STOP having it be closed.


It's been open since 1854...
 
2021-07-08 2:59:51 PM  
casual disregard:

Fillmore? What kind of name is that?


miro.medium.comView Full Size
 
2021-07-08 3:11:14 PM  
This is an extremely fascinating topic, as it cross-cuts so much of 19th and 20th century history.
In Japan, Commodore Perry and his Black Ships are still taught in Japanese schools as the reason Japan had to open the country and blame him for the collapse of the government and inummerable humiliations. In a take which I find ironic, the arrival of the US probably saved Japan from a similar colonial existance to the rest of Asia at the time. Japan hadn't had direct interactions with any European country since the 16th century, but their last experience with the Portugese and the Spainiards caused them to close off the country completely. Except for a single-digit number of Dutch living on a separate island, Japan was a closed country. By the mid 1800s, Japan was getting the attention of European powers and probably would have gone the way of China if the US hadn't intervened. The US were more interested in getting access to trade with Japan rather than any colonial ambitions. In fact, the US was still at the height of their anti-British, anti-colonial sentiment. They actively helped Japan to understand European diplomacy so they could effectively compete with them. There's an anecdote where the Japanese were trying to deal with the influx of the European powers now seeking trade and favored relations with Japan, similar to the Americans. A Japanese diplomat was sent to deal with the French, but was litterally laughed at. "Your terrible clothes. And do you have special negotiating powers spelled out by your government to enter treaties, as per Section 1904-a Section 5 of International Law? No? Then you're a clown wasting my time." Leaving humiliated, this led Japan to see the critical need to modernize, or they're going to be rolled over by the European powers. Again, the US actively helped with European negotiations, brought them to the US to study politics, science, medicince, and military technology. By the turn of the 20th century Japan had kicked out all the Europeans again, and went on to beat the Red Army. Fun fact: Japan is a founding member of both the League of Nations and the United Nations. One of only a handful of Asian countries.
But even with this US assitance, the Japanese still point to Perry as the real reason for opening up the country and the subsequent ills. Although, to be fair, the US still brings up Pearl Harbor, which hasn't been relevant since the 1950s. To say Japan and the US have a complicated relationship would be an understatement.
 
2021-07-08 3:19:10 PM  
Not as impressive as when Cortez pulled the same trick on a different continent, but still not bad.
 
2021-07-08 3:21:04 PM  

NM Volunteer: Merltech: Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry, representing the U.S. government, sails into Tokyo Bay, Japan, with a squadron of four vessels. For a time, Japanese officials refused to speak with Perry, but under threat of attack by the superior American ships they accepted letters from President Millard Fillmore, making the United States the first Western nation to establish relations with Japan since it had been declared closed to foreigners two centuries before

And you wonder why no one in the old world trusts us.

Europeans did that in Asia too.  Periodically bombarded their towns with naval artillery as well.


Lol, the british went to war with china to force the chinese government to allow them to sell opium to the chinese populace.

"Hey, we are gonna sell dope to your people, and if you give us any shiat about it, we will kill you."
 
2021-07-08 5:38:08 PM  

casual disregard: Merltech: Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry, representing the U.S. government, sails into Tokyo Bay, Japan, with a squadron of four vessels. For a time, Japanese officials refused to speak with Perry, but under threat of attack by the superior American ships they accepted letters from President Millard Fillmore, making the United States the first Western nation to establish relations with Japan since it had been declared closed to foreigners two centuries before

And you wonder why no one in the old world trusts us.

Millard Fillmore? What kind of name is that?

We have a sour history in both directions but USA and Japan are for better or for worse indelibly linked.


He's a cartoon duck that spouts unfunny conservative opinions. Pretty sure he's retired
 
2021-07-08 6:14:58 PM  
djfitz: Fun fact: Japan is a founding member of both the League of Nations and the United Nations. One of only a handful of Asian countries.

Pretty sure Japan was not a founding member of the United Nations as it joined in 1956.
https://www.mofa.go.jp/mofaj/gaiko/jp​_​un/index.html
 
2021-07-08 6:56:18 PM  
I saw a documentary one time about a US soldier that went to Japan and he became a Samurai. He was like the best Samurai that there ever was too.
 
2021-07-08 7:02:06 PM  

djfitz: This is an extremely fascinating topic, as it cross-cuts so much of 19th and 20th century history.
In Japan, Commodore Perry and his Black Ships are still taught in Japanese schools as the reason Japan had to open the country and blame him for the collapse of the government and inummerable humiliations. In a take which I find ironic, the arrival of the US probably saved Japan from a similar colonial existance to the rest of Asia at the time. Japan hadn't had direct interactions with any European country since the 16th century, but their last experience with the Portugese and the Spainiards caused them to close off the country completely. Except for a single-digit number of Dutch living on a separate island, Japan was a closed country. By the mid 1800s, Japan was getting the attention of European powers and probably would have gone the way of China if the US hadn't intervened. The US were more interested in getting access to trade with Japan rather than any colonial ambitions. In fact, the US was still at the height of their anti-British, anti-colonial sentiment. They actively helped Japan to understand European diplomacy so they could effectively compete with them. There's an anecdote where the Japanese were trying to deal with the influx of the European powers now seeking trade and favored relations with Japan, similar to the Americans. A Japanese diplomat was sent to deal with the French, but was litterally laughed at. "Your terrible clothes. And do you have special negotiating powers spelled out by your government to enter treaties, as per Section 1904-a Section 5 of International Law? No? Then you're a clown wasting my time." Leaving humiliated, this led Japan to see the critical need to modernize, or they're going to be rolled over by the European powers. Again, the US actively helped with European negotiations, brought them to the US to study politics, science, medicince, and military technology. By the turn of the 20th century Japan had kicked out all the Eur ...


/welp you stole my thunder
 
2021-07-08 7:15:09 PM  

Clash City Farker: I saw a documentary one time about a US soldier that went to Japan and he became a Samurai. He was like the best Samurai that there ever was too.


Tom cruise  ain't no samurai
 
2021-07-08 8:02:42 PM  

No Catchy Nickname: djfitz: Fun fact: Japan is a founding member of both the League of Nations and the United Nations. One of only a handful of Asian countries.

Pretty sure Japan was not a founding member of the United Nations as it joined in 1956.
https://www.mofa.go.jp/mofaj/gaiko/jp_​un/index.html


Thank you for the correction!
 
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