Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Live Science)   Half of Americans think that Earth has been visited by intelligent aliens, which might explain why they haven't been back   (livescience.com) divider line
    More: Unlikely, Unidentified flying object, Extraterrestrial life, imminent release of a U.S. intelligence report, Green fireballs, UFO sightings, Flying saucer, Pew Research Center, intelligent life  
•       •       •

241 clicks; posted to STEM » on 02 Jul 2021 at 2:05 PM (22 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



54 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2021-07-02 1:58:47 PM  
'Let's get out here and come back in 100 years when they're all dead... we'll fix the atmosphere and I'll live in what was called,'Carmel''
 
2021-07-02 2:09:53 PM  
IF(big mega if) they ever came here, the most likely reason they didn't make contact is probably the same reason that when i go hiking if meet a racoon i don't try to learn to speak racoon so i can try to explain to him why i came for a hike.
 
2021-07-02 2:15:51 PM  
I am 100% sure we have been visited by pig ignorant aliens.  Intelligent ones?  Not so sure.
 
2021-07-02 2:36:19 PM  
I only have 2 thoughts on this topic. 1) Is the extraterrestrial life? Absolutely. It would be foolish to think otherwise, the Universe is just so vast. Do I think any are intelligent? No idea. 2) Are UAP's extraterrestrial? My guess is no. My guess is also not another nation having such superior tech. It would leak somehow. I don't know what the phenomenon is....and we may never know. It's definately something though. It exists and is not smoke and mirrors.
If it IS aliens (I like the raccoon metaphore).
I'd like to know, just out of curiosity.....but really? If it's not an "Independence Day" scenario? I don't that I really care that much.
 
2021-07-02 2:44:57 PM  

bluewave69: IF(big mega if) they ever came here, the most likely reason they didn't make contact is probably the same reason that when i go hiking if meet a racoon i don't try to learn to speak racoon so i can try to explain to him why i came for a hike.


That would be true if space was fun and interesting and full of cool things to do, like your hike.

But it's not. Space is vast and empty and boring and dark and it takes way too long to get anywhere. The most interesting thing life could possibly find in space is other life.

Because they didn't come all this way to check out the hills.
 
2021-07-02 2:48:05 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-07-02 2:50:42 PM  
Timeless relevance
Steve Vai - Little Green Men
Youtube TjHR-SI7Bv0
 
2021-07-02 3:02:36 PM  

bluewave69: IF(big mega if) they ever came here, the most likely reason they didn't make contact is probably the same reason that when i go hiking if meet a racoon i don't try to learn to speak racoon so i can try to explain to him why i came for a hike.


On mars humans are the aliens
 
2021-07-02 3:03:14 PM  

Saiga410: I am 100% sure we have been visited by pig ignorant aliens.  Intelligent ones?  Not so sure.


Settle down Adolf
 
2021-07-02 3:04:33 PM  

Aviron: I only have 2 thoughts on this topic. 1) Is the extraterrestrial life? Absolutely. It would be foolish to think otherwise, the Universe is just so vast. Do I think any are intelligent? No idea. 2) Are UAP's extraterrestrial? My guess is no. My guess is also not another nation having such superior tech. It would leak somehow. I don't know what the phenomenon is....and we may never know. It's definately something though. It exists and is not smoke and mirrors.
If it IS aliens (I like the raccoon metaphore).
I'd like to know, just out of curiosity.....but really? If it's not an "Independence Day" scenario? I don't that I really care that much.


Occums razor
 
2021-07-02 3:06:15 PM  

Ishkur: bluewave69: IF(big mega if) they ever came here, the most likely reason they didn't make contact is probably the same reason that when i go hiking if meet a racoon i don't try to learn to speak racoon so i can try to explain to him why i came for a hike.

That would be true if space was fun and interesting and full of cool things to do, like your hike.

But it's not. Space is vast and empty and boring and dark and it takes way too long to get anywhere. The most interesting thing life could possibly find in space is other life.

Because they didn't come all this way to check out the hills.


And we dont know wht their travel capabilities are.

Humans are not the end all and be all of Physics
 
2021-07-02 3:06:37 PM  

Linux_Yes: bluewave69: IF(big mega if) they ever came here, the most likely reason they didn't make contact is probably the same reason that when i go hiking if meet a racoon i don't try to learn to speak racoon so i can try to explain to him why i came for a hike.

On mars humans are the aliens


I mean, are we really aliens if we build the only inhabitants?
 
2021-07-02 3:08:14 PM  

bluewave69: IF(big mega if) they ever came here, the most likely reason they didn't make contact is probably the same reason that when i go hiking if meet a racoon i don't try to learn to speak racoon so i can try to explain to him why i came for a hike.


I think they are here to sneak some of our music.
 
2021-07-02 3:10:04 PM  
Dude dips a tea cup into the pacific ocean and holds it up....look!  No fish!
 
2021-07-02 3:28:01 PM  

Linux_Yes: Aviron: I only have 2 thoughts on this topic. 1) Is the extraterrestrial life? Absolutely. It would be foolish to think otherwise, the Universe is just so vast. Do I think any are intelligent? No idea. 2) Are UAP's extraterrestrial? My guess is no. My guess is also not another nation having such superior tech. It would leak somehow. I don't know what the phenomenon is....and we may never know. It's definately something though. It exists and is not smoke and mirrors.
If it IS aliens (I like the raccoon metaphore).
I'd like to know, just out of curiosity.....but really? If it's not an "Independence Day" scenario? I don't that I really care that much.

Occums razor


Exactly this.On both counts.
 
2021-07-02 3:29:46 PM  
Wait until they discover we have a small talent for war
 
2021-07-02 4:01:30 PM  

DerAppie: Linux_Yes: bluewave69: IF(big mega if) they ever came here, the most likely reason they didn't make contact is probably the same reason that when i go hiking if meet a racoon i don't try to learn to speak racoon so i can try to explain to him why i came for a hike.

On mars humans are the aliens

I mean, are we really aliens if we build the only inhabitants?


No chance of that, Earth-wanker.
 
2021-07-02 4:18:13 PM  

tfresh: 'Let's get out here and come back in 100 years when they're all dead... we'll fix the atmosphere and I'll live in what was called,'Carmel''


Which do you mean? Carmel-by-the-sea or Carmel-in-the-valley?
 
2021-07-02 4:19:39 PM  
With our current knowledge of the way the universe works, we know that the closest planet(s) to us which are capable of life are so far away that the laws of physics make it impossible to travel between the two points in anyones' live times. At least in reasonable terms. Now knowing this and going on to the next point which is that we and they know that there is no way anyone can know if the respective environments are friendly to the other type of lifeform. With the great distances and timespans involved it is unlikely that anyone is going to take the risks and expenses with such low odds of survival or even the ability of being able to relay the info back you their respective home base.
 
2021-07-02 4:21:01 PM  
Alien life - and probably intelligent alien life - certainly exists. The odds are just too great for it with how effin' big the universe is (and there's supposedly strong scientific arguments for other universes existing; I won't even pretend to understand them). I know how difficult crossing space likely is, but naysayers have thought things impossible many, many, many times before.

Anyway, super tired of the cynical "why would they care about Earth" arguments, especially since they typically come from people who acknowledge how exceedingly rare life must be in the universe. They would be absolutely fascinated by all of the life here, something we take horribly for granted, because they just passed thousands of lightyears of farking Less-Than-Kansas.
 
2021-07-02 4:25:25 PM  
They only come once and a while to store or fetch grain from their silos.
 
2021-07-02 4:34:47 PM  

bluewave69: IF(big mega if) they ever came here, the most likely reason they didn't make contact is probably the same reason that when i go hiking if meet a racoon i don't try to learn to speak racoon so i can try to explain to him why i came for a hike.


That is probably the most sublime reasoning of human-potential alien interaction ever put to words. I am stealing this.
 
2021-07-02 5:50:07 PM  

Wobambo: Alien life - and probably intelligent alien life - certainly exists. The odds are just too great for it with how effin' big the universe is (and there's supposedly strong scientific arguments for other universes existing; I won't even pretend to understand them). I know how difficult crossing space likely is, but naysayers have thought things impossible many, many, many times before.


It's not impossible so much as implausible: such a project would take centuries to come to fruition and have no material return for anyone, ever. People just don't do that, not in numbers great enough to muster the resources for such a project.

Anyway, super tired of the cynical "why would they care about Earth" arguments, especially since they typically come from people who acknowledge how exceedingly rare life must be in the universe. They would be absolutely fascinated by all of the life here, something we take horribly for granted, because they just passed thousands of lightyears of farking Less-Than-Kansas.

That, OTOH, exemplifies the other half of the problem: the assumption that other tool-making sapients universally think the way that a certain subset of humanity does. It's quite plausible that many sapient species take one look at the thousands of light-years of nothing at all and decide fark that, we're staying here where there's free life support.
 
2021-07-02 5:52:01 PM  
Ah, the famous American optimism.

True, it would be sad to think there had never been any intelligent life here at all.
 
2021-07-02 5:52:28 PM  
The Earth. It's where we keep our stuff.
 
2021-07-02 6:47:16 PM  

nemisonic: tfresh: 'Let's get out here and come back in 100 years when they're all dead... we'll fix the atmosphere and I'll live in what was called,'Carmel''

Which do you mean? Carmel-by-the-sea or Carmel-in-the-valley?


Carmel by the Sea of course.
 
2021-07-02 7:11:00 PM  

UndeadPoetsSociety: Wobambo: Alien life - and probably intelligent alien life - certainly exists. The odds are just too great for it with how effin' big the universe is (and there's supposedly strong scientific arguments for other universes existing; I won't even pretend to understand them). I know how difficult crossing space likely is, but naysayers have thought things impossible many, many, many times before.

It's not impossible so much as implausible: such a project would take centuries to come to fruition and have no material return for anyone, ever. People just don't do that, not in numbers great enough to muster the resources for such a project.

Anyway, super tired of the cynical "why would they care about Earth" arguments, especially since they typically come from people who acknowledge how exceedingly rare life must be in the universe. They would be absolutely fascinated by all of the life here, something we take horribly for granted, because they just passed thousands of lightyears of farking Less-Than-Kansas.

That, OTOH, exemplifies the other half of the problem: the assumption that other tool-making sapients universally think the way that a certain subset of humanity does. It's quite plausible that many sapient species take one look at the thousands of light-years of nothing at all and decide fark that, we're staying here where there's free life support.


Yeah, we are talking about doing what is impossible for us right now, escaping to Mars. I think it is funny you people think that aliens would be so different from what the basis of life is, to seek change.
 
2021-07-02 7:16:24 PM  

Fano: Wait until they discover we have a small talent for war


They already know this. They seem to cluster around nuclear arsenals and have documented interfered with launch panels in both US and Russia.
 
2021-07-02 9:23:43 PM  
The Lizard People never stopped infiltrating the government.
There are Nordics everywhere.
The Greys are all gone.
Some birds are real, but not all of them.
And the transmissions being received from 30 light years away just keep repeating, "trump, trump, trump". What could it mean?
 
2021-07-02 10:11:06 PM  

foxtail: With our current knowledge of the way the universe works, we know that the closest planet(s) to us which are capable of life are so far away that the laws of physics make it impossible to travel between the two points in anyones' live times.


What? Europa is right there and is almost certainly got chemistry interesting enough to be called "life". Ditto on Jupiter, honestly. And that's just prosaic, mostly Earth-like life, with cells and DNA and boring shiat like that. I'm of the mind that the universe is positively littered with life. Like, we've demonstrated conditions in which patterns in plasma self replicate, which lays the groundwork for life on the Sun! But none of this life is terribly like us. And... that's kinda great?

Like, hey, even if I'm wrong, we're looking at three possible futures for alien contact. First, there aren't any within spitting distance. Entirely possible, probable even, but definitely disappointing. Worse, though, we meet aliens and they are like us. We can find useful bases of communication. Cultural exchange. They have rubber foreheads and weird alien religions, and oh god, that's the worst outcome I can possibly imagine. How dull.

But the third option is that alien life is so alien that we have to debate whether or not it's even alive. And that's exciting! That opens up so many possibilities, and there are so many places where you could find that kind of life. Not only that, it's probable- the entire universe is built on entropy gradients. It's the core of thermodynamics. Life is, at its core, turbulence in that flow. Order flows to disorder, but life can make that flow turbulent, chaotic, seemingly in reverse, at points. Interesting things happen at interfaces, and once you define life in terms of entropic turbulence a lot of things start looking like life.
 
2021-07-03 6:36:09 AM  
The first question would be, have we been detected yet? Imagine trying to spot one of our tiny GPS satellites and such from light years away. The biggest thing we have up there is the ISS, and on "trying to find it with a telescope from many light years away" scale, that wouldn't even register.

The second question would be, would they make contact if they knew we were here? When there's several tech levels of difference, there's a serious risk of creating something akin to a cargo cult. There's a good chance aliens, especially of the peaceful, friendly variety, would have "don't make contact until they reach this level of advancement" rules.

Of course, as we start to colonize, and ultimately terraform Mars, we're going to turn a red planet green. That is waaaaaaay more likely to be noticed, and may well be the gold standard for "ok, they're advanced enough".
 
2021-07-03 7:21:06 AM  

trerro: The first question would be, have we been detected yet?


The question is backwards. We haven't done anything detectable at any meaningful range. The light bubble of radio transmissions is, if we're being generous, 100ly in radius. Practically, the signal falls beyond the background noise well before that, as those early radio transmissions weren't terribly powerful. But that means the Earth has a theoretically detectable volume of 4 million cubic light years. The volume of the galaxy is roughly 26 trillion cubic light years. There's no reason to even look in this direction. The better question is the one Fermi asked: why haven't we detected anyone else? It's a law of probabilities- if civilizations last long enough to colonize the stars, then if you randomly encounter a civilization, it's most likely in that "conquering the stars" phase of its existence.

trerro: Of course, as we start to colonize, and ultimately terraform Mars, we're going to turn a red planet green.


This is never going to happen. There's no real point. Mars is marginally more habitable than space itself, and it's never going to retain much atmosphere- the idea that we could free up gasses frozen in the ice caps to fill the atmosphere is science fiction. There's not enough, and there's also not enough energy to do it, it wouldn't be self-sustaining even if it were. Plus, there's nothing there. There's nothing useful on Mars. Like, you couldn't build a useful factory out of the shiat you find on Mars. Asteroid colonies are where it's at. Rich metallic resources, rich organic resources, no meaningful escape velocity, making it cheap and easy to ship materials from asteroids to Earth or other destinations. You'll need to seal your atmosphere, but that's fine. Tunnel out Ceres, pressurize it, and then go mining.

Mars is the absolute worst place for humans to colonize. Io makes more sense, because there's at least useful resources on Io.
 
2021-07-03 7:46:02 AM  

trerro: That is waaaaaaay more likely to be noticed,


Also, a terraformed Mars wouldn't be particularly noticeable either, especially as we'd be doing it on long time scales. There'd be no sudden shift in chemistry, and thus no easy indication that anything other than a natural process caused the shift. By the same token, the fact that we're Venus-forming the Earth would go equally unnoticed.
 
2021-07-03 8:52:51 AM  

Fano: Wait until they discover we have a small talent for war


Planet of the apes
 
2021-07-03 8:54:30 AM  

foxtail: With our current knowledge of the way the universe works, we know that the closest planet(s) to us which are capable of life are so far away that the laws of physics make it impossible to travel between the two points in anyones' live times. At least in reasonable terms. Now knowing this and going on to the next point which is that we and they know that there is no way anyone can know if the respective environments are friendly to the other type of lifeform. With the great distances and timespans involved it is unlikely that anyone is going to take the risks and expenses with such low odds of survival or even the ability of being able to relay the info back you their respective home base.


As long as the space aliens follow mans laws of physics there wont be any problems!
 
2021-07-03 8:55:28 AM  

Wobambo: Alien life - and probably intelligent alien life - certainly exists. The odds are just too great for it with how effin' big the universe is (and there's supposedly strong scientific arguments for other universes existing; I won't even pretend to understand them). I know how difficult crossing space likely is, but naysayers have thought things impossible many, many, many times before.

Anyway, super tired of the cynical "why would they care about Earth" arguments, especially since they typically come from people who acknowledge how exceedingly rare life must be in the universe. They would be absolutely fascinated by all of the life here, something we take horribly for granted, because they just passed thousands of lightyears of farking Less-Than-Kansas.


We are fascinated by mars...
 
2021-07-03 9:00:03 AM  
Given what humans can now do with telescopes I am starting to wonder if there's an alien astronomer out there, maybe within 100 light years, wondering why the composition of our atmosphere has these strange and unnatural compounds in it.

But actually physically visiting?  Nope.  You don't cross light years of the void with all the difficulty, risk, and investment that requires just to butcher cows and molest the anuses of some hillbillies and then turn around and go home.
 
2021-07-03 9:21:20 AM  

t3knomanser: trerro: The first question would be, have we been detected yet?

The question is backwards. We haven't done anything detectable at any meaningful range. The light bubble of radio transmissions is, if we're being generous, 100ly in radius. Practically, the signal falls beyond the background noise well before that, as those early radio transmissions weren't terribly powerful. But that means the Earth has a theoretically detectable volume of 4 million cubic light years. The volume of the galaxy is roughly 26 trillion cubic light years. There's no reason to even look in this direction. The better question is the one Fermi asked: why haven't we detected anyone else? It's a law of probabilities- if civilizations last long enough to colonize the stars, then if you randomly encounter a civilization, it's most likely in that "conquering the stars" phase of its existence.

trerro: Of course, as we start to colonize, and ultimately terraform Mars, we're going to turn a red planet green.

This is never going to happen. There's no real point. Mars is marginally more habitable than space itself, and it's never going to retain much atmosphere- the idea that we could free up gasses frozen in the ice caps to fill the atmosphere is science fiction. There's not enough, and there's also not enough energy to do it, it wouldn't be self-sustaining even if it were. Plus, there's nothing there. There's nothing useful on Mars. Like, you couldn't build a useful factory out of the shiat you find on Mars. Asteroid colonies are where it's at. Rich metallic resources, rich organic resources, no meaningful escape velocity, making it cheap and easy to ship materials from asteroids to Earth or other destinations. You'll need to seal your atmosphere, but that's fine. Tunnel out Ceres, pressurize it, and then go mining.

Mars is the absolute worst place for humans to colonize. Io makes more sense, because there's at least useful resources on Io.


We wont take care of earth so why colonize mars??
 
2021-07-03 9:58:43 AM  

Linux_Yes: Ishkur: bluewave69: IF(big mega if) they ever came here, the most likely reason they didn't make contact is probably the same reason that when i go hiking if meet a racoon i don't try to learn to speak racoon so i can try to explain to him why i came for a hike.

That would be true if space was fun and interesting and full of cool things to do, like your hike.

But it's not. Space is vast and empty and boring and dark and it takes way too long to get anywhere. The most interesting thing life could possibly find in space is other life.

Because they didn't come all this way to check out the hills.

And we dont know wht their travel capabilities are.

Humans are not the end all and be all of Physics


Humans have great imaginations...
 
2021-07-03 11:58:00 AM  
Alien life almost certainly exists on other planets. But they're too far away for us to ever cross paths.
 
2021-07-03 12:12:43 PM  

RabidRythmDivas: Alien life almost certainly exists on other planets. But they're too far away for us to ever cross paths.


:(  Yeah.  I think we'll be lucky to be able to see something through a telescope someday and say, "well, that spectrographic analysis almost certainly means there is life... unless there's some novel natural process going on we haven't seen before".

The distances involve make communication too expensive, the time delay makes it pointless.  Going for a physical visit is right out.

On the other hand, every 50,000 years or so on average the Sun encounters another star that gets significantly closer than 1 ly in distance.  Maybe some day one will pass by that has 'people' orbiting it and we can strike up a conversation for a while.  But probably not, and I certainly won't be around to see that if it happens.
 
2021-07-03 2:42:37 PM  

Linux_Yes: Wobambo: Alien life - and probably intelligent alien life - certainly exists. The odds are just too great for it with how effin' big the universe is (and there's supposedly strong scientific arguments for other universes existing; I won't even pretend to understand them). I know how difficult crossing space likely is, but naysayers have thought things impossible many, many, many times before.

Anyway, super tired of the cynical "why would they care about Earth" arguments, especially since they typically come from people who acknowledge how exceedingly rare life must be in the universe. They would be absolutely fascinated by all of the life here, something we take horribly for granted, because they just passed thousands of lightyears of farking Less-Than-Kansas.

We are fascinated by mars...


Yeah, the nearest neighbor. And people haven't really been fascinated by it in a while.
 
2021-07-03 9:53:07 PM  

Linux_Yes: Ishkur: bluewave69: IF(big mega if) they ever came here, the most likely reason they didn't make contact is probably the same reason that when i go hiking if meet a racoon i don't try to learn to speak racoon so i can try to explain to him why i came for a hike.

That would be true if space was fun and interesting and full of cool things to do, like your hike.

But it's not. Space is vast and empty and boring and dark and it takes way too long to get anywhere. The most interesting thing life could possibly find in space is other life.

Because they didn't come all this way to check out the hills.

And we dont know wht their travel capabilities are.

Humans are not the end all and be all of Physics


This shiat, RIGHT HERE!

Just because we can't currently do something, it doesn't mean that it can't be done. And as far as us being uninteresting goes, the ETs wouldn't know this until they came here anyway. And it's not like we haven't observed primitive tribes ourselves, trying not to interfere...

I don't know if we've ever seen aliens on this planet, but it's pretty ignorant/narcissistic to think that we're the only race capable of traveling in space.
 
2021-07-03 9:56:14 PM  

t3knomanser: foxtail: With our current knowledge of the way the universe works, we know that the closest planet(s) to us which are capable of life are so far away that the laws of physics make it impossible to travel between the two points in anyones' live times.

What? Europa is right there and is almost certainly got chemistry interesting enough to be called "life". Ditto on Jupiter, honestly. And that's just prosaic, mostly Earth-like life, with cells and DNA and boring shiat like that. I'm of the mind that the universe is positively littered with life. Like, we've demonstrated conditions in which patterns in plasma self replicate, which lays the groundwork for life on the Sun! But none of this life is terribly like us. And... that's kinda great?

Like, hey, even if I'm wrong, we're looking at three possible futures for alien contact. First, there aren't any within spitting distance. Entirely possible, probable even, but definitely disappointing. Worse, though, we meet aliens and they are like us. We can find useful bases of communication. Cultural exchange. They have rubber foreheads and weird alien religions, and oh god, that's the worst outcome I can possibly imagine. How dull.

But the third option is that alien life is so alien that we have to debate whether or not it's even alive. And that's exciting! That opens up so many possibilities, and there are so many places where you could find that kind of life. Not only that, it's probable- the entire universe is built on entropy gradients. It's the core of thermodynamics. Life is, at its core, turbulence in that flow. Order flows to disorder, but life can make that flow turbulent, chaotic, seemingly in reverse, at points. Interesting things happen at interfaces, and once you define life in terms of entropic turbulence a lot of things start looking like life.


But didn't the aliens tell us to leave Europa alone?
 
2021-07-03 9:58:49 PM  

trerro: The first question would be, have we been detected yet? Imagine trying to spot one of our tiny GPS satellites and such from light years away. The biggest thing we have up there is the ISS, and on "trying to find it with a telescope from many light years away" scale, that wouldn't even register.

The second question would be, would they make contact if they knew we were here? When there's several tech levels of difference, there's a serious risk of creating something akin to a cargo cult. There's a good chance aliens, especially of the peaceful, friendly variety, would have "don't make contact until they reach this level of advancement" rules.

Of course, as we start to colonize, and ultimately terraform Mars, we're going to turn a red planet green. That is waaaaaaay more likely to be noticed, and may well be the gold standard for "ok, they're advanced enough".


They don't need to spot our satellites, we've been broadcasting radio waves for over a hundred years now. That's the same thing we're looking for from other planets. The old movie trope about aliens learning about Earth by studying old TV shows is actually not entirely dumb, it's the biggest signal of what/who we are that we've sent out from the planet.
 
2021-07-03 10:03:56 PM  

t3knomanser: trerro: The first question would be, have we been detected yet?

The question is backwards. We haven't done anything detectable at any meaningful range. The light bubble of radio transmissions is, if we're being generous, 100ly in radius. Practically, the signal falls beyond the background noise well before that, as those early radio transmissions weren't terribly powerful. But that means the Earth has a theoretically detectable volume of 4 million cubic light years. The volume of the galaxy is roughly 26 trillion cubic light years. There's no reason to even look in this direction. The better question is the one Fermi asked: why haven't we detected anyone else? It's a law of probabilities- if civilizations last long enough to colonize the stars, then if you randomly encounter a civilization, it's most likely in that "conquering the stars" phase of its existence.

trerro: Of course, as we start to colonize, and ultimately terraform Mars, we're going to turn a red planet green.

This is never going to happen. There's no real point. Mars is marginally more habitable than space itself, and it's never going to retain much atmosphere- the idea that we could free up gasses frozen in the ice caps to fill the atmosphere is science fiction. There's not enough, and there's also not enough energy to do it, it wouldn't be self-sustaining even if it were. Plus, there's nothing there. There's nothing useful on Mars. Like, you couldn't build a useful factory out of the shiat you find on Mars. Asteroid colonies are where it's at. Rich metallic resources, rich organic resources, no meaningful escape velocity, making it cheap and easy to ship materials from asteroids to Earth or other destinations. You'll need to seal your atmosphere, but that's fine. Tunnel out Ceres, pressurize it, and then go mining.

Mars is the absolute worst place for humans to colonize. Io makes more sense, because there's at least useful resources on Io.


We need to start with the moon. 90% of the fuel and weight of a rocket is used to get it away from the Earth's atmosphere and it's gravity well. You can set up facilities on the moon to build ships that can travel to anywhere in the solar system you want. The damn things can be made from balsa wood and tissue paper once the planet Earth is out of the equation. Plus, you can't pollute an ecosystem that doesn't exist. Same with water and the atmosphere.

We can build real spaceships if we aren't trying to build them on Earth. Same with Mars, it can be a way station for deeper hops. But we aren't really getting anywhere with our current plan.
 
2021-07-03 10:07:39 PM  

Unsung_Hero: Given what humans can now do with telescopes I am starting to wonder if there's an alien astronomer out there, maybe within 100 light years, wondering why the composition of our atmosphere has these strange and unnatural compounds in it.

But actually physically visiting?  Nope.  You don't cross light years of the void with all the difficulty, risk, and investment that requires just to butcher cows and molest the anuses of some hillbillies and then turn around and go home.


Who ever said that they went home? Once again, someone is giving human attributes to creatures who aren't human and aren't from Earth. They may have long lifespans and see 50 years as we would see a month. This could just be an exploratory expedition that is still completing their mission. Hell, it could be a Star Trek scenario where they're just cruising space looking for signs of life, with no concrete plan beforehand.
 
2021-07-03 10:12:25 PM  

Mikey1969: You can set up facilities on the moon to build ships that can travel to anywhere in the solar system you want.


The moon is definitely better than Mars having a much smaller gravity well. Which is also why Mars makes no sense as a "way station". Mars is hard to get to, just from orbital mechanics. And again, big gravity well. Better off just skipping Mars and going straight for Ceres.
 
2021-07-04 1:33:32 AM  

Mikey1969: Linux_Yes: Ishkur: bluewave69: IF(big mega if) they ever came here, the most likely reason they didn't make contact is probably the same reason that when i go hiking if meet a racoon i don't try to learn to speak racoon so i can try to explain to him why i came for a hike.

That would be true if space was fun and interesting and full of cool things to do, like your hike.

But it's not. Space is vast and empty and boring and dark and it takes way too long to get anywhere. The most interesting thing life could possibly find in space is other life.

Because they didn't come all this way to check out the hills.

And we dont know wht their travel capabilities are.

Humans are not the end all and be all of Physics

This shiat, RIGHT HERE!

Just because we can't currently do something, it doesn't mean that it can't be done. And as far as us being uninteresting goes, the ETs wouldn't know this until they came here anyway. And it's not like we haven't observed primitive tribes ourselves, trying not to interfere...

I don't know if we've ever seen aliens on this planet, but it's pretty ignorant/narcissistic to think that we're the only race capable of traveling in space.


The TV advertisers told murcans they r the shiat and murcans fell for it.  From day one we r told how amazing we r and that everything circles around us.

How pathetic.

Hey murcans, these objects fly around ur nukes and in ur airspace with impunity and u cant do shiat abt it.

U like apples murca??

How do u like them apples??
 
2021-07-04 1:35:30 AM  

t3knomanser: Mikey1969: You can set up facilities on the moon to build ships that can travel to anywhere in the solar system you want.

The moon is definitely better than Mars having a much smaller gravity well. Which is also why Mars makes no sense as a "way station". Mars is hard to get to, just from orbital mechanics. And again, big gravity well. Better off just skipping Mars and going straight for Ceres.


I dont know ...

I kinda like uranus.


((::
 
Displayed 50 of 54 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.