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(Inside Science)   How cavemen quietly hunted goats, see?   (insidescience.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, Finger, American Sign Language, Ring finger, Sign language, Language, Little finger, hand stencils of Gargas Cave, hand signs  
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753 clicks; posted to STEM » on 24 Jun 2021 at 3:31 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-06-24 2:02:16 PM  
Cave Paintings May Depict Ice Age Sign Language

So...is it Ovaltine or Burma Shave?
 
2021-06-24 3:37:47 PM  
Goatse pun?  That's a stretch.
 
2021-06-24 3:52:36 PM  
Clearly one of them was just big into metal \m/
 
2021-06-24 4:04:01 PM  
Golf clap, subby
 
2021-06-24 5:02:38 PM  
A modern artist's recreation of prehistoric hand stencils found in caves.

I can see they put a lot of effort into this article.
 
2021-06-24 6:01:07 PM  
Did they just stare at them ??
 
2021-06-24 7:16:33 PM  
Yeah, they did a little more than "hunt" goats.  They domesticated them. Before then goatkind was wild, untamed, the rulers of the more vertical parts of the world.

Now, they're wild, untamed, the rulers of the more vertical parts of the far...   hmm.  *scratches chin*

Maybe we were domesticated by them
 
2021-06-24 7:28:03 PM  

leeksfromchichis: Yeah, they did a little more than "hunt" goats.  They domesticated them. Before then goatkind was wild, untamed, the rulers of the more vertical parts of the world.

Now, they're wild, untamed, the rulers of the more vertical parts of the far...   hmm.  *scratches chin*

Maybe we were domesticated by them


i.imgur.comView Full Size

Subby
 
2021-06-24 7:35:28 PM  
 
2021-06-24 7:36:31 PM  
Ack, wrong thread
 
2021-06-24 11:40:51 PM  
"Cave Paintings May Depict Ice Age Sign Language"
"Ancient stencils of hands with "mutilated" fingers may actually show a type of sign language used for hunting or silent rituals."

Fark user imageView Full Size

Either that or early woodworkers were decorating their business.
 
2021-06-25 10:13:47 PM  
The consensus is that Paleolithic artists who made those hand stencils were often missing the distal portions of their fingers. The debate is whether those fingers were lost to accident, frostbite, or deliberate amputation, and whether any deliberate amputation was done as a religious sacrifice, a punishment, or something else.

The reason there's no debate on whether the artists were actually missing portions of their fingers is because if you bent your finger and then press your hand against a flat surface and blow paint over it, the silhouette of the shortened finger won't be as sharp as the other fingers, because it blocks the paint higher up, and the outline of the hand has a slightly different shape.

Also, in those hand outlines above, the middle one on the bottom row, you literally cannot bend the pinky finger by itself. Try it. If you bend your pinky, your ring finger automatically follows. The ligaments are connected. You can bend your ring finger without bending your pinky, but not the other way around. If you have to do it, you can bend your pinky with your other hand and hold it, but then it's no longer a single handed sign.
 
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