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(Some Nerd)   Stephen Wolfram basks in his own combinatorial genius. The rest of us just try to remember the words to Conjunction Junction while we submit Fark headlines   (writings.stephenwolfram.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Lambda calculus, Mathematics, Mathematical logic, Combinatory logic, arithmetic be, Moses Schnfinkel, notion of symbolic functions f, Logic  
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807 clicks; posted to STEM » on 20 Jun 2021 at 9:05 PM (22 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-06-20 9:10:22 PM  
This goes to something schizophrenics generally experience, called apophenia. Dictionary: Apophenia definition is - the tendency to perceive a connection or meaningful pattern between unrelated or random things (such as objects or ideas). This goes so deeply into us schizophrenics that I remember one catatonic schizophrenic I lived with for 6 months in an institution would draw geometric shapes on paper, and then masturbate to them. I have made apophenia real. This is so basic to everything and instinctual I believe it is the basis of our reality. I don't think nature is a Boolean Algebra working on binary bits computer. If it was, then why doesn't this algebra naturally show up in nature? As in why can't we see it at least in our highly complex computing brains?

My Theory of Everything: a computable logic that arises from how connections are made and/or broken over time. This is what I call a "dynamic stateless computer" based on "logic geometry" - a new type of computer that forms logic through dynamic connections, or dynamic geometric logic, or logic through the changing shape of geometry, like a truth table that the truths change and is essentially functional programming, but is computable logic without mathematics, where the changing shape is the only information. I have working models that do many different sophisticated things, including emulating math. The models are on top of a digital computer of course, but the entirety of the logic is performed by one command that allows you to create or rewrite a command to a string of commands, and nothing else. I call this the Logic Geometry Theory. Contact me at john­ph­antom[nospam-﹫-backwards]li­a­m­toh*com or go to github.com/johnphantom/Dynamic-Statel​e​ss-Computer for the models.

I can perform the permutations of this word problem:

You have a combination padlock with four dials on it. Each dial has the numbers 0 through 4 on them. The lock can have as many 0s as dials, and is set to 0000 by default. The lock does not allow you to use any number between 1 and 4 two or more times in the combination. The following combinations are valid: 0123 1234 0103 0010 4031. The following combinations are invalid: 0113 4014 0202 4444. How many possible combinations are there?

Here is the solution:

Fark user imageView Full Size


If scaled to 18 wheels and 18 numbers by changing n (which is 4 above), I can perform the 2,968,971,264,021,448,999 possible permutations each reachable within 18 keystrokes or less.

This can also be solved using Pascal's Triangle that goes back to BC ancient China in a new way, because we didn't have a representation for zero until the 13th century and in the implementation I was counting nothing as something, which is represented by zero in the word problem. The implementation is selecting 4 different grenades' order when buying and throwing, where you essentially place the grenades into the order you want to throw, with empty slots being possible if you do not select all 4 grenades.

I have also built a randomizer that drives a relational database and calculators that can emulate addition/subtraction/multiplication/di​vision.

Here is the solution using algebra I and Pascal's Triangle:

Fark user imageView Full Size


//I do plan to make the complex calculator more complex in less size
 
2021-06-20 9:35:14 PM  

johnphantom: This goes to something schizophrenics generally experience, called apophenia. Dictionary: Apophenia definition is - the tendency to perceive a connection or meaningful pattern between unrelated or random things (such as objects or ideas). This goes so deeply into us schizophrenics that I remember one catatonic schizophrenic I lived with for 6 months in an institution would draw geometric shapes on paper, and then masturbate to them. I have made apophenia real. This is so basic to everything and instinctual I believe it is the basis of our reality. I don't think nature is a Boolean Algebra working on binary bits computer. If it was, then why doesn't this algebra naturally show up in nature? As in why can't we see it at least in our highly complex computing brains?

My Theory of Everything: a computable logic that arises from how connections are made and/or broken over time. This is what I call a "dynamic stateless computer" based on "logic geometry" - a new type of computer that forms logic through dynamic connections, or dynamic geometric logic, or logic through the changing shape of geometry, like a truth table that the truths change and is essentially functional programming, but is computable logic without mathematics, where the changing shape is the only information. I have working models that do many different sophisticated things, including emulating math. The models are on top of a digital computer of course, but the entirety of the logic is performed by one command that allows you to create or rewrite a command to a string of commands, and nothing else. I call this the Logic Geometry Theory. Contact me at johnphantom[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]liamtoh[* image 7x13]com or go to github.com/johnphantom/Dynamic-Statele​ss-Computer for the models.

I can perform the permutations of this word problem:

You have a combination padlock with four dials on it. Each dial has the numbers 0 through 4 on them. The lock can have as many 0s as dials, and is se ...


My old partner definitely experienced apophenia.  One problem is that as a musician he was frequently right about making music theory connections... and that encouraged him to believe that ALL the connections were real.  Holy conspiracy theories, Batman!

I think that he didn't have schizophrenia but had brain damage from lots of meth back in the day.  Even when people quit meth, they keep doing meth-person stuff.  It sucks.
 
2021-06-20 9:49:15 PM  
What's your function?
 
2021-06-20 10:06:56 PM  

rosekolodny: My old partner definitely experienced apophenia.  One problem is that as a musician he was frequently right about making music theory connections... and that encouraged him to believe that ALL the connections were real.  Holy conspiracy theories, Batman!

I think that he didn't have schizophrenia but had brain damage from lots of meth back in the day.  Even when people quit meth, they keep doing meth-person stuff.  It sucks.


Schizophrenia doesn't have to show up to have enhanced brain connections in the areas that cause schizophrenia. Einstein's brain showed signs of schizophrenia, and his son had it.
 
2021-06-20 10:16:10 PM  

johnphantom: This goes to something schizophrenics generally experience, called apophenia. Dictionary: Apophenia definition is - the tendency to perceive a connection or meaningful pattern between unrelated or random things (such as objects or ideas). This goes so deeply into us schizophrenics that I remember one catatonic schizophrenic I lived with for 6 months in an institution would draw geometric shapes on paper, and then masturbate to them. I have made apophenia real. This is so basic to everything and instinctual I believe it is the basis of our reality. I don't think nature is a Boolean Algebra working on binary bits computer. If it was, then why doesn't this algebra naturally show up in nature? As in why can't we see it at least in our highly complex computing brains?

My Theory of Everything: a computable logic that arises from how connections are made and/or broken over time. This is what I call a "dynamic stateless computer" based on "logic geometry" - a new type of computer that forms logic through dynamic connections, or dynamic geometric logic, or logic through the changing shape of geometry, like a truth table that the truths change and is essentially functional programming, but is computable logic without mathematics, where the changing shape is the only information. I have working models that do many different sophisticated things, including emulating math. The models are on top of a digital computer of course, but the entirety of the logic is performed by one command that allows you to create or rewrite a command to a string of commands, and nothing else. I call this the Logic Geometry Theory. Contact me at johnphantomliamtohcom or go to github.com/johnphantom/Dynamic-Statele​ss-Computer for the models.

I can perform the permutations of this word problem:

You have a combination padlock with four dials on it. Each dial has the numbers 0 through 4 on them. The lock can have as many 0s as dials, and is set to 0000 by default. The lock does not allow you to use any number between 1 and 4 two or more times in the combination. The following combinations are valid: 0123 1234 0103 0010 4031. The following combinations are invalid: 0113 4014 0202 4444. How many possible combinations are there?

Here is the solution:

[Fark user image image 492x212]

If scaled to 18 wheels and 18 numbers by changing n (which is 4 above), I can perform the 2,968,971,264,021,448,999 possible permutations each reachable within 18 keystrokes or less.

This can also be solved using Pascal's Triangle that goes back to BC ancient China in a new way, because we didn't have a representation for zero until the 13th century and in the implementation I was counting nothing as something, which is represented by zero in the word problem. The implementation is selecting 4 different grenades' order when buying and throwing, where you essentially place the grenades into the order you want to throw, with empty slots being possible if you do not select all 4 grenades.

I have also built a randomizer that drives a relational database and calculators that can emulate addition/subtraction/multiplication/di​vision.

Here is the solution using algebra I and Pascal's Triangle:

[Fark user image image 708x849]

//I do plan to make the complex calculator more complex in less size


I kept trying to sieve by different letters to see what meme you were trying to do with that wall of text
 
2021-06-20 10:16:49 PM  

johnphantom: rosekolodny: My old partner definitely experienced apophenia.  One problem is that as a musician he was frequently right about making music theory connections... and that encouraged him to believe that ALL the connections were real.  Holy conspiracy theories, Batman!

I think that he didn't have schizophrenia but had brain damage from lots of meth back in the day.  Even when people quit meth, they keep doing meth-person stuff.  It sucks.

Schizophrenia doesn't have to show up to have enhanced brain connections in the areas that cause schizophrenia. Einstein's brain showed signs of schizophrenia, and his son had it.


The weird thing for me is the lack of critical thinking.  The absence of desire to examine the idea and see if it passes the sniff test.

I get that some people are incapable because that's how their brains work.  Other people are probably capable but... they just won't question their own ideas/connections.

Like their brains skip over the vetting process and an IDEA becomes TRUTH without examination.
 
2021-06-20 10:30:38 PM  

johnphantom: This goes to something schizophrenics generally experience, called apophenia.


Or, you know, medicalizing poetry is a red herring. Poets have always done math games in the same way you do. And you're really good at it. You'd have fun hanging out with poets when they really let their creativity and depth of knowledge rip.
 
2021-06-20 10:53:10 PM  
I get that cheesesteak wins in Pennsylvania, but the author of the article has clearly never had my signature sandwich: 6 slices of American cheese and a farkload of ripple chips on a hoagie roll, microwaved for 45 seconds.

I haven't had one in 20 years and I'm still trying to work the last one off, but I stand by my creation.
 
2021-06-20 11:50:10 PM  
This is the absolute wrong thread.
 
2021-06-20 11:55:04 PM  

Cake Hunter: This is the absolute wrong thread.


But now I want cheesesteak.
 
2021-06-21 12:14:07 AM  

Cake Hunter: This is the absolute wrong thread.


Is there ever a wrong thread for cheesesteaks?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-21 1:58:23 AM  
> In the end, combinators are full of computational irreducibility. But they also have layers of computational reducibility, some of which are aligned with the kinds of things mathematics and mathematical logic have been set up to handle. And in this there's a curious resonance with our recent Physics Project.
In our models based on hypergraph rewriting there's also a kind of bedrock of computational irreducibility
. ...

In reading through the whole post I got the feeling that Woofie has no real understanding of this area beyond what you could get from advanced undergraduate classes in the 1970s. After that he was inventing his own stuff and didn't pay any attention to further progress by others.

The New Physics Project seems to be led by Jonathan Gorard,
https://www.wolframphysics.org/people​/​jonathan-gorard/
And from poking around seems to invokve a lot of Category Theory which Woofie doesn't understand.

Here a group is trying to explain things to Woofie  I could only listen to so much before I found it too painful to continue.


Wolfram Physics Project: Category Theory Meets Computational Irreducibility
Youtube zHD-Fy60Ub8
 
2021-06-21 11:53:08 AM  
TFA was written in December, for the 100th anniversary of Schönfinkel's presentation in Göttingen wherein combinators were introduced to the world.  Not sure why it's being posted here now.  But it's a good survey of the history of mathematical logic... until it takes a left turn into crazytown.  Not having read Wolfram's books, I imagine the experience is similar.  Fascinating deep dives into mathematics interspersed with the ravings of a first-year philosophy major on mescaline.  Dude, what if the universe was, like, a big Turing machine?  And we're the tape, man.  We're the tape!

It's mentioned in passing that Church's The Calculi of Lambda-Conversion (1941) made no use of Schönfinkel's S.  And it's worth noting why.  At the time, the S combinator was poorly understood.  Curry's work started with a different combinatory basis, BCWK, based on what he considered the four fundamental combinatory operations: repeating an argument, deleting an argument, swapping two arguments, and swapping parentheses.  It wasn't until 1948, "A Simplification of the Theory of Combinators", that Curry realized the SK basis provided for a simple reduction from lambda terms.  If Schönfinkel's career hadn't been cut tragically short, this insight may have come a decade or more earlier and perhaps combinators would have seen more acceptance early on.  History is a finicky thing.

johnphantom: Contact me at johnphantomliamtohcom or go to github.com/johnphantom/Dynamic-Statele​ss-Computer for the models.


I don't claim to understand what the hell you're talking about, but it looks like you might be interested in the theory of pointer machines.  Seems very similar to what you're proposing.  (And if it is, don't feel bad.  Curry was put off when he first discovered that his theory of combinators wasn't entirely original, but his advisor Oswald Veblen assured him that it meant he was on the right track.)
 
2021-06-21 12:23:45 PM  

Olympic Trolling Judge: johnphantom: Contact me at johnphantomliamtohcom or go to github.com/johnphantom/Dynamic-Statele​ss-Computer for the models.


I don't claim to understand what the hell you're talking about, but it looks like you might be interested in the theory of pointer machines.  Seems very similar to what you're proposing.  (And if it is, don't feel bad.  Curry was put off when he first discovered that his theory of combinators wasn't entirely original, but his advisor Oswald Veblen assured him that it meant he was on the right track.)


Thank you, I appreciate that reference. Cursory look, they are using instructions. I only use one instruction the entirety of the logic is contained in: a computable logic that arises from how connections are made and/or broken over time. That is it. Everything about it. There is nothing more. One command: alias, that creates or rewrites a command to a string of commands, and again, nothing else.
 
2021-06-21 12:54:57 PM  

Olympic Trolling Judge: Not sure why it's being posted here now.  But it's a good survey of the history of mathematical logic...


I found it in a really interesting post on MetaFilter. I expected a more excitedly interesting conversation about it's contents but like, I jsut read Wittgenstein's On Certainty on Friday and edited a book review where I was considering the isolating effects of social media (in the review on a political level, in my "future research" file on the way form matches content way more often than programmers admit). Obviously I was in a different headspace than...everybody?

However, for all this threads shiatting on Wolfram, Comp Sci faculty and AI researchers always sound like first year philosophy students when they talk about abstraction in languages, and when they talk about ethics of AI, that's nota  bugm it is a feature of AI research and it's farking scary to watch as it spreads facile simplifications through law and private sector funding. So, like, suck it up.
 
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