Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(CNN)   Ship's captain dies at sea and the crew is lost about what to do with the body. There is absolutely no precedent for this. No one has any idea of what to do with a body that needs a proper burial. A burial at sea. It's as if the concept doesn't exist   (cnn.com) divider line
    More: Amusing, Evergreen Marine, Italia Marittima, Cargo ship, Ship transport, cargo ships, Capurro's body, According to Jim, Ship  
•       •       •

2962 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Jun 2021 at 3:05 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



37 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-06-20 3:23:01 AM  
Sew him or her up in a tarpaulin and weight it down with a cannonball

Summon the ship's company, mumble an appropriate prayer, then over the side.

Issue a rum ration.
 
2021-06-20 3:30:22 AM  
Tilt the plank right down the side,
Put him on it, make him slide.
 
2021-06-20 3:32:15 AM  
Unless it was an expected death or an autopsy can be performed aboard ship (like with a US Navy ship), maritime law is generally to preserve the body in refrigeration for authorities at the port to examine.

They don't just bury crewmembers at sea without following the law. That would make the death seem...criminal.
 
2021-06-20 3:32:21 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-20 3:38:28 AM  
Unless MV Ital Libera is very old, she'll have at least 2 freezers for the crews' food. Book 2 states the food stuffs shall be moved from the smaller freezer which becomes a morgue freezer unless the body is either off-loaded at a port or to another ship ASAP for transfer back home, local burial or be buried at Sea in International Water.

Further, the 2nd in Command automatically becomes Captain unless the home office sends orders denying that at least temporary promotion, but in that case, the Company must designate by a new captain by name and start moving the new skipper to the ship immediately. A ship without a licensed captain is considered to be a ship not under command and therefore a hazard to Navigation, in which case it is to make for the nearest port, enter the port or roads during daylight hours in clement weather and anchor as directed to await orders from the Harbormaster.

Couldn't be simpler or more commonsensical.  In the Navy, we did radio drills in these pubs at least 2x/yr. Always got a giggle with "leaky penis" code in the Medical Section of Pub 1. These pubs were more for Merchantmen but we had to know them, or at least be familiar with them so we could communicate with a merchant ship where the crew did not speak English or a language we had on board. (Once had a Cajun-speaking Seaman from East Texas trying to communicate with the gibberish pseudo-French spoken on a Haitian ship. That was a long, funny night.)

/S/ USN (Ret.)
 
2021-06-20 3:49:26 AM  
A drop of Nelson's Blood wouldn't do us any harm.
 
2021-06-20 3:53:28 AM  
Capurro's wife, Mollard, says she reached out to the ship's owner, Italia Marittima -- a division of Taiwan's Evergreen Marine Corporation. Evergreen Marine also owns Ever Given, the container ship that famously became trapped in the Suez Canal in March.

Looks like I picked a bad year to start shipping glue
 
2021-06-20 3:54:29 AM  
As captain of the ship, Capurro was also the designated medical officer so there was nobody else to help.

Ah, cost saving measures.
 
2021-06-20 3:55:01 AM  

hardinparamedic: Unless it was an expected death or an autopsy can be performed aboard ship (like with a US Navy ship), maritime law is generally to preserve the body in refrigeration for authorities at the port to examine.

They don't just bury crewmembers at sea without following the law. That would make the death seem...criminal.


What I was going to say. Legal shiat storm would be what they would face if they tried burial at sea. Depending on which country they were flying under *cough* America *cough* the police would brow beat the cree members until one of them "confessed" it was murder.

Even without corrupt cops wanting a quick and easy closed case, the crew would be in for a world of hurt.
 
2021-06-20 4:32:36 AM  
Burial At Sea of Soviet Submariners from Hughes Glomar Explorer - September 4, 1974
Youtube TOypyBdVZhU
 
2021-06-20 4:34:59 AM  

Bootleg: As captain of the ship, Capurro was also the designated medical officer so there was nobody else to help.

Ah, cost saving measures.


It's a crew of 20 people.  Normally one of the other officers is designated the medical officer, but I guess nobody else have the certification

thatboyoverthere: What I was going to say. Legal shiat storm would be what they would face if they tried burial at sea. Depending on which country they were flying under *cough* America *cough* the police would brow beat the cree members until one of them "confessed" it was murder.

Even without corrupt cops wanting a quick and easy closed case, the crew would be in for a world of hurt.


Oh shut the fark up.  The anti-American swipe is pointless and utterly incorrect.  I know in Fark it's customary to just jump to the worst impossible conclusion, but no, an American-flag ship is not going to get arrested and have the police force someone to confess to murdering a documented case of illness.  The "legal shiat" has nothing to do with "oh, they'll assume it was murder!".  It's because in general nations don't want corpses being dumped into their waters.  The only time it's legal to dump a whole corpse overboard is if you're deep into international waters (like middle of the ocean deep) and you don't have any other way to preserve the body.  Otherwise, nope.  You can't put a body over the side in any other circumstance.  Even the common burials at sea that you can choose to have done are of cremated ashes.
 
2021-06-20 4:41:40 AM  

hardinparamedic: They don't just bury crewmembers at sea without following the law. That would make the death seem...criminal.


Nah, it's nothing like that.  It's a combination of the environmental laws I already mentioned, and that no sailor actually wants to be buried at sea without a funeral for their families.  They all want to rest at home, or at least visit home one last time.  It's a courtesy thing for your shipmate.
 
2021-06-20 4:45:33 AM  

hardinparamedic: Unless it was an expected death or an autopsy can be performed aboard ship (like with a US Navy ship), maritime law is generally to preserve the body in refrigeration for authorities at the port to examine.

They don't just bury crewmembers at sea without following the law. That would make the death seem...criminal.


Yeah this.  Burial at sea isn't really a thing anymore, unless you specifically request it.  Burial at sea was a remnant of the days of sail, before refrigeration, when you were weeks or months away from port, and the body wasn't going to keep.

It was also used a lot in WW2, but only because there was no realistic way of diverting a ship, or fleet of ships, following combat, when they still had a vital mission to perform.
 
2021-06-20 4:49:29 AM  
S11E12 - Perks of the International Waters
Youtube yIy5aZBHs-A
 
2021-06-20 5:14:00 AM  

Lurk Who's Talking: (Once had a Cajun-speaking Seaman from East Texas trying to communicate with the gibberish pseudo-French spoken on a Haitian ship. That was a long, funny night.)


Yeoman at my reserve base talked about a mayday assist on the Indian Ocean that involved talking to merchie crew in gutter Arabic, and they'd talk to their captain in Greek, who would radio the ship's owner in some language they never figured out - and back down the chain to talk back.  They figured that was pretty bad, until they realized the ship's engineers had really thin Arabic that wasn't up to serious technicalities, and spoke Russian mostly which no one else on either ship did.  They did however find a merchantman crew guy that could read and write Russian (but not speak it) so he could listen to the Navy guys yammering at him in Arabic, write it down in Cyrillic, and pass that along to the engineers - they normally just tended to their knitting and didn't socialize much with the rest of the crew.  They eventually got the thing limping off to Djibouti, but 2 days before that they finally realized the merchie's Filipino cook spoke English and could talk to the crew  - he'd just been below decks doing his job, didn't know he was needed.  Merchie crew guys didn't know he spoke English, and no one thought to ask the cook.  Kinda ship that had 6 different sets of papers, and crew from all over the world and quite possibly from other worlds too.  Gods know how they got anything at all done on an ongoing basis with the communication problems alone.

/Yeoman dude had a copy of the report
//'cause apparently no one wanted to believe him at first when he'd tell that one
///sad part was he said it wasn't the worst story like that he'd heard
 
2021-06-20 7:15:13 AM  
A shipmate attended a burial at sea back in the late 80's; a formal request by a Master Chief that had served 30 years.

They loaded the coffin on board in port along with several family members;  went way out. After a brief service, the coffin was slid off the side of the ship and out and into the ocean.... and then it all went to shiat.

I don't know the whys: the coffin was supposedly prepped - whether that means weighted, holes drilled to flood, a combination of the two -  it was supposed to sink, yet floated happily beside the ship.

My friend said, the Skipper waited 15 minutes then ordered the .50 cal be brought up and loaded; they strafed the casket until it went down.

/This was traumatic for the family.
//Hell, my relatives would have fought to see who got to pull the trigger: How many chances do you get to fire a .50 cal automatic?
///Bear in mind: the Captain was required to sink: leaving stuff floating is bad.  My ship (more than once) strafed a container that had washed overboard during a storm.
 
2021-06-20 7:55:56 AM  
azquotes.comView Full Size
 
2021-06-20 8:12:37 AM  

Tired_of_the_BS: A shipmate attended a burial at sea back in the late 80's; a formal request by a Master Chief that had served 30 years.

They loaded the coffin on board in port along with several family members;  went way out. After a brief service, the coffin was slid off the side of the ship and out and into the ocean.... and then it all went to shiat.

I don't know the whys: the coffin was supposedly prepped - whether that means weighted, holes drilled to flood, a combination of the two -  it was supposed to sink, yet floated happily beside the ship.

My friend said, the Skipper waited 15 minutes then ordered the .50 cal be brought up and loaded; they strafed the casket until it went down.

/This was traumatic for the family.
//Hell, my relatives would have fought to see who got to pull the trigger: How many chances do you get to fire a .50 cal automatic?
///Bear in mind: the Captain was required to sink: leaving stuff floating is bad.  My ship (more than once) strafed a container that had washed overboard during a storm.


Hell, I'd want my casket to be shot with a 50 cal.

"Even death itself couldn't keep him down. We had to double tap that asshole."
 
2021-06-20 8:43:09 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-20 8:48:27 AM  
Can I be fired out of a Torepedo tube? Or a Trident silo?
 
2021-06-20 9:18:54 AM  
6 weeks in a storage room...

Note they didn't say temperature and humidity controlledstorage room...

isuspect the coroner wouldn't want to do an autopsy even if he could and that anyone entering that storage room now would try to breath through their mouth.
 
2021-06-20 9:32:25 AM  

acouvis: 6 weeks in a storage room...

Note they didn't say temperature and humidity controlledstorage room...

isuspect the coroner wouldn't want to do an autopsy even if he could and that anyone entering that storage room now would try to breath through their mouth.


Can you do an autopsy on seeping flan?
 
2021-06-20 9:34:03 AM  

Lurk Who's Talking: (Once had a Cajun-speaking Seaman from East Texas trying to communicate with the gibberish pseudo-French spoken on a Haitian ship.)

/S/ USN (Ret.)


0_o
 
2021-06-20 9:36:10 AM  
Burial at sea seems likefar too much shoveling forme
 
2021-06-20 10:19:35 AM  
Can you put him in a life boat and launch it?
 
2021-06-20 10:33:52 AM  

KarmicDisaster: Can you put him in a life boat and launch it?


None of the other crew is certified to shoot the flaming arrow.
images-wixmp-ed30a86b8c4ca887773594c2.wixmp.comView Full Size
 
2021-06-20 10:41:31 AM  

hardinparamedic: Unless it was an expected death or an autopsy can be performed aboard ship (like with a US Navy ship), maritime law is generally to preserve the body in refrigeration for authorities at the port to examine.

They don't just bury crewmembers at sea without following the law. That would make the death seem...criminal.


Yup.  You don't just do a burial at sea without a doctor being involved.

acouvis: 6 weeks in a storage room...

Note they didn't say temperature and humidity controlledstorage room...

isuspect the coroner wouldn't want to do an autopsy even if he could and that anyone entering that storage room now would try to breath through their mouth.


I would expect they would be using some sort of air supply.
 
2021-06-20 10:48:12 AM  

Fancy_Bear: Sew him or her up in a tarpaulin and weight it down with a cannonball

Summon the ship's company, mumble an appropriate prayer, then over the side.

Issue a rum ration.


The ship goes down with the captain?
 
2021-06-20 11:26:40 AM  
Most modern ships have things called freezers. Sure it might make getting the ice cream a bit awkward.
 
2021-06-20 11:32:00 AM  

NEDM: Bootleg: As captain of the ship, Capurro was also the designated medical officer so there was nobody else to help.

Ah, cost saving measures.

It's a crew of 20 people.  Normally one of the other officers is designated the medical officer, but I guess nobody else have the certification


I meant more why aren't there two designated medical officers. It's not like calling 911 is an option for the ship, right? If the medical officer is critically injured, what happens then?
 
2021-06-20 11:35:24 AM  

Lurk Who's Talking: Unless MV Ital Libera is very old, she'll have at least 2 freezers for the crews' food. Book 2 states the food stuffs shall be moved from the smaller freezer which becomes a morgue freezer unless the body is either off-loaded at a port or to another ship ASAP for transfer back home, local burial or be buried at Sea in International Water.

Further, the 2nd in Command automatically becomes Captain unless the home office sends orders denying that at least temporary promotion, but in that case, the Company must designate by a new captain by name and start moving the new skipper to the ship immediately. A ship without a licensed captain is considered to be a ship not under command and therefore a hazard to Navigation, in which case it is to make for the nearest port, enter the port or roads during daylight hours in clement weather and anchor as directed to await orders from the Harbormaster.

Couldn't be simpler or more commonsensical.  In the Navy, we did radio drills in these pubs at least 2x/yr. Always got a giggle with "leaky penis" code in the Medical Section of Pub 1. These pubs were more for Merchantmen but we had to know them, or at least be familiar with them so we could communicate with a merchant ship where the crew did not speak English or a language we had on board. (Once had a Cajun-speaking Seaman from East Texas trying to communicate with the gibberish pseudo-French spoken on a Haitian ship. That was a long, funny night.)

/S/ USN (Ret.)


A Ship without a captain isn't NUC, that's insane. If someone competent to drive the ship is on the bridge and the ship can maneuver it isn't NUC. The RoR don't give two shiats about the command structure of a ship.

Granted a lot of lazy jackholes love to fly NUC when they're just drifting, but that's not right. NUC specifically exists as a "JESUS CHRIST WE CAN'T CONTROL THE SHIP GET OUT OF THE WAY"

/USN SWO, just got out 2 years ago.
//Having to fly NUC because you lost steering as the OOD is not fun.
 
2021-06-20 11:36:33 AM  

Bootleg: NEDM: Bootleg: As captain of the ship, Capurro was also the designated medical officer so there was nobody else to help.

Ah, cost saving measures.

It's a crew of 20 people.  Normally one of the other officers is designated the medical officer, but I guess nobody else have the certification

I meant more why aren't there two designated medical officers. It's not like calling 911 is an option for the ship, right? If the medical officer is critically injured, what happens then?


Because that costs money, commercial ships are usually a master class in penny pinching.
 
2021-06-20 11:39:28 AM  

Theeng: Bootleg: NEDM: Bootleg: As captain of the ship, Capurro was also the designated medical officer so there was nobody else to help.

Ah, cost saving measures.

It's a crew of 20 people.  Normally one of the other officers is designated the medical officer, but I guess nobody else have the certification

I meant more why aren't there two designated medical officers. It's not like calling 911 is an option for the ship, right? If the medical officer is critically injured, what happens then?

Because that costs money, commercial ships are usually a master class in penny pinching.


Hence, my initial thought, namely "Ah, cost saving measures."
 
2021-06-20 12:51:49 PM  

Bootleg: Theeng: Bootleg: NEDM: Bootleg: As captain of the ship, Capurro was also the designated medical officer so there was nobody else to help.

Ah, cost saving measures.

It's a crew of 20 people.  Normally one of the other officers is designated the medical officer, but I guess nobody else have the certification

I meant more why aren't there two designated medical officers. It's not like calling 911 is an option for the ship, right? If the medical officer is critically injured, what happens then?

Because that costs money, commercial ships are usually a master class in penny pinching.

Hence, my initial thought, namely "Ah, cost saving measures."


I somehow missed that, my bad.
 
2021-06-20 5:57:31 PM  

Tired_of_the_BS: A shipmate attended a burial at sea back in the late 80's; a formal request by a Master Chief that had served 30 years.

They loaded the coffin on board in port along with several family members;  went way out. After a brief service, the coffin was slid off the side of the ship and out and into the ocean.... and then it all went to shiat.

I don't know the whys: the coffin was supposedly prepped - whether that means weighted, holes drilled to flood, a combination of the two -  it was supposed to sink, yet floated happily beside the ship.

My friend said, the Skipper waited 15 minutes then ordered the .50 cal be brought up and loaded; they strafed the casket until it went down.

/This was traumatic for the family.
//Hell, my relatives would have fought to see who got to pull the trigger: How many chances do you get to fire a .50 cal automatic?
///Bear in mind: the Captain was required to sink: leaving stuff floating is bad.  My ship (more than once) strafed a container that had washed overboard during a storm.


Story of the year.
Go Navy!
 
2021-06-20 9:07:59 PM  

arkansized: Tired_of_the_BS: A shipmate attended a burial at sea back in the late 80's; a formal request by a Master Chief that had served 30 years.

They loaded the coffin on board in port along with several family members;  went way out. After a brief service, the coffin was slid off the side of the ship and out and into the ocean.... and then it all went to shiat.

I don't know the whys: the coffin was supposedly prepped - whether that means weighted, holes drilled to flood, a combination of the two -  it was supposed to sink, yet floated happily beside the ship.

My friend said, the Skipper waited 15 minutes then ordered the .50 cal be brought up and loaded; they strafed the casket until it went down.

/This was traumatic for the family.
//Hell, my relatives would have fought to see who got to pull the trigger: How many chances do you get to fire a .50 cal automatic?
///Bear in mind: the Captain was required to sink: leaving stuff floating is bad.  My ship (more than once) strafed a container that had washed overboard during a storm.

Story of the year.
Go Navy!


It used to be, a floating coffin (or corpse) was proof positive that the floater was either murdered or cursed and attempting to come back from the dead to exact vengeance on his murderer. Hence the story that Blackbeard swam three times around his ship after being beheaded. Also why so much effort was expended to sink the corpse, at least until the ship could get clear of the area.
 
2021-06-20 10:52:05 PM  

Gyrfalcon: Hence the story that Blackbeard swam three times around his ship after being beheaded.


I do remember that story. Superstition is a maritime tradition too.
 
Displayed 37 of 37 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.