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(Internet Archive)   So what would a 2.2 MB disk look like in 1962?   (archive.org) divider line
    More: Vintage, planned power outage, Mainframe computer, random access storage, Free Download, Univac, Internet Archive, computers, services  
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1497 clicks; posted to STEM » on 18 Jun 2021 at 6:55 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-06-17 10:28:51 PM  
The first hard drive I ever bought was a 20 mb drive like this and it was for an 8086 someone gave me. I learned so much with that computer.
Fark user imageView Full Size

Then 286, 386,486 and then Pentium etc.
 
2021-06-17 11:01:36 PM  
My parents had a Kaypro 10 with a 10 MB hard drive. It came partitioned into Drives A: and B: Also had a 300 baud modem but that may have been purchased separately.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-17 11:39:56 PM  

Farkenhostile: The first hard drive I ever bought was a 20 mb drive like this and it was for an 8086 someone gave me. I learned so much with that computer.
[Fark user image 850x478]
Then 286, 386,486 and then Pentium etc.


Waitasec...

...  Is that a CMI drive?

One of the infamous CMI ST-506 full height 20 MB drives as used in the first IBM ATs?

The drives that made *every possible* design mistake, so that if you crossed your eyes at it, it would crash and take all your data with it?

Can't be sure without seeing the back, but from as good a comparison as I can make, I'm now thinking, Nope, not a CMI.
 
2021-06-17 11:53:58 PM  

Farkenhostile: The first hard drive I ever bought was a 20 mb drive like this and it was for an 8086 someone gave me. I learned so much with that computer.
[Fark user image 850x478]
Then 286, 386,486 and then Pentium etc.


Hard drives were unimaginable luxury.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-18 12:09:23 AM  
Imagine going back in time and handing them one of these
Fark user imageView Full Size

and telling them that they were holding the equivalent of 455,000 of those disks, and it costs $40
 
2021-06-18 1:10:26 AM  

Lighting: Imagine going back in time and handing them one of these
[Fark user image 175x136]
and telling them that they were holding the equivalent of 455,000 of those disks, and it costs $40


bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.comView Full Size
 
2021-06-18 2:44:43 AM  

Farkenhostile: The first hard drive I ever bought was a 20 mb drive like this and it was for an 8086 someone gave me. I learned so much with that computer.
[Fark user image 850x478]
Then 286, 386,486 and then Pentium etc.


I had a 86 meg drive that was about the same size.  I had to turn it on before the computer because the power surge would trip the circuit breaker.   It was a ST-506 drive that hooked to a SASI controller that was used as a prototype for an early SCSI interface.
 
2021-06-18 2:52:05 AM  

Farkenhostile: The first hard drive I ever bought was a 20 mb drive like this and it was for an 8086 someone gave me. I learned so much with that computer.
[Fark user image image 850x478]
Then 286, 386,486 and then Pentium etc.


ST-251-1?  31 years later and I can still remember the model number and exactly where I bought it.
 
2021-06-18 3:28:25 AM  

DON.MAC: Farkenhostile: The first hard drive I ever bought was a 20 mb drive like this and it was for an 8086 someone gave me. I learned so much with that computer.
[Fark user image 850x478]
Then 286, 386,486 and then Pentium etc.

I had a 86 meg drive that was about the same size.  I had to turn it on before the computer because the power surge would trip the circuit breaker.   It was a ST-506 drive that hooked to a SASI controller that was used as a prototype for an early SCSI interface.


SASI?

Now, *there's* a name I haven't heard in a long time.  A *very* long time.
 
2021-06-18 3:29:58 AM  
Never worked on one of those, but I did work with a Univac back in 1965. That looked more like this...


Fastrand drum. Stored more angular momentum than data.

d3ecqbn6etsqar.cloudfront.netView Full Size


I can't find a pic of the disc drives, but we did nightly disc backups and would attach fault reports to any drives with pools of hydraulic fluid in them. Some nights, we had to make a judgement call as to which drive was least dangerous, and just avert our eyes and use it.
 
2021-06-18 7:30:41 AM  

Farkenhostile: The first hard drive I ever bought was a 20 mb drive like this and it was for an 8086 someone gave me. I learned so much with that computer.
[Fark user image 850x478]
Then 286, 386,486 and then Pentium etc.


The first hard drive I ever bought was a 20 mb drive (exactly) like THAT and it was for the brand new $3000 IBM PC AT 8086 we had at the office in 1986
 
2021-06-18 7:33:04 AM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Farkenhostile: The first hard drive I ever bought was a 20 mb drive like this and it was for an 8086 someone gave me. I learned so much with that computer.
[Fark user image 850x478]
Then 286, 386,486 and then Pentium etc.

Waitasec...

...  Is that a CMI drive?

One of the infamous CMI ST-506 full height 20 MB drives as used in the first IBM ATs?

The drives that made *every possible* design mistake, so that if you crossed your eyes at it, it would crash and take all your data with it?

Can't be sure without seeing the back, but from as good a comparison as I can make, I'm now thinking, Nope, not a CMI.


Wasn't the IBM one the "Winchester" drive?
 
2021-06-18 7:40:45 AM  
This is the bad boy I started out with. In today's terms it'd just hold a single MP3 - but couldn't, as it was divided into four volumes. Its soothing turbine sound acted as white-noise as I gently rested, knowing the BBS was in full swing.
trs-80.comView Full Size
 
2021-06-18 7:41:40 AM  

fustanella: This is the bad boy I started out with. In today's terms it'd just hold a single MP3 - but couldn't, as it was divided into four volumes. Its soothing turbine sound acted as white-noise as I gently rested, knowing the BBS was in full swing.
[trs-80.com image 800x458]


There's no banana for scale. That's the size of a full tower PC, landscape mode. :)
 
2021-06-18 7:48:26 AM  

enry: Farkenhostile: The first hard drive I ever bought was a 20 mb drive like this and it was for an 8086 someone gave me. I learned so much with that computer.
[Fark user image image 850x478]
Then 286, 386,486 and then Pentium etc.

ST-251-1?  31 years later and I can still remember the model number and exactly where I bought it.


OMG! So can I, it was an ST-225
 
2021-06-18 7:57:01 AM  
in 1963 they were 9" platters
 
2021-06-18 8:07:04 AM  
I worked in product evaluation and support at Computerland HQ during this time. Almost every week some amazing product would come out. I still remember the whole tech staff staring in disbelief at the 5MB shoebox sized drive for the Apple III. lol
 
2021-06-18 8:10:15 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size



no-one knows....it's in there, somewhere.
 
2021-06-18 8:12:49 AM  

Lighting: Imagine going back in time and handing them one of these
[Fark user image image 175x136]
and telling them that they were holding the equivalent of 455,000 of those disks, and it costs $40


upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size

"Cartons of punched cards stored in a United States National Archives Records Service facility in 1959. Each carton could hold 2,000 cards."

According to the site that I can't locate at the moment, what's visible in that picture represents about 4GB of data.
 
2021-06-18 8:32:12 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: Lighting: Imagine going back in time and handing them one of these
[Fark user image image 175x136]
and telling them that they were holding the equivalent of 455,000 of those disks, and it costs $40

[upload.wikimedia.org image 850x671]
"Cartons of punched cards stored in a United States National Archives Records Service facility in 1959. Each carton could hold 2,000 cards."

According to the site that I can't locate at the moment, what's visible in that picture represents about 4GB of data.


Ah, here we go:

"There are about 20 rows of pallets visible, each row is 15 pallets wide, pallets are stacked two high (at least). Each pallet contains 45 boxes of punched cards. Standard card boxes contained 2000 cards. Each card held up to 80 characters, for a total of about 4.3 billion characters of data in this storage facility - about the same as a 4GB flash drive.
 
2021-06-18 8:37:32 AM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: DON.MAC: Farkenhostile: The first hard drive I ever bought was a 20 mb drive like this and it was for an 8086 someone gave me. I learned so much with that computer.
[Fark user image 850x478]
Then 286, 386,486 and then Pentium etc.

I had a 86 meg drive that was about the same size.  I had to turn it on before the computer because the power surge would trip the circuit breaker.   It was a ST-506 drive that hooked to a SASI controller that was used as a prototype for an early SCSI interface.

SASI?

Now, *there's* a name I haven't heard in a long time.  A *very* long time.


Same here. My first computer (a Wyse 286) had an MFM controller - that's obscure enough for most these days. I've only seen two or three SASI controllers total, and I doubt any of them worked when I saw them.
 
2021-06-18 8:59:39 AM  

Gordon Bennett: Farkenhostile: The first hard drive I ever bought was a 20 mb drive like this and it was for an 8086 someone gave me. I learned so much with that computer.
[Fark user image 850x478]
Then 286, 386,486 and then Pentium etc.

Hard drives were unimaginable luxury.

[Fark user image 850x555]


Magnetic storage?  We used to dream of magnetic storage!
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2021-06-18 9:00:20 AM  

fustanella: This is the bad boy I started out with. In today's terms it'd just hold a single MP3 - but couldn't, as it was divided into four volumes. Its soothing turbine sound acted as white-noise as I gently rested, knowing the BBS was in full swing.
[trs-80.com image 800x458]


Talking about turbine sounds:

brutman.comView Full Size

Good ole Bernoulli disk drives.
 
2021-06-18 9:01:56 AM  
Stringy-floppy will make a comeback.

classic-computers.org.nzView Full Size
 
2021-06-18 9:03:55 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: ArcadianRefugee: Lighting: Imagine going back in time and handing them one of these
[Fark user image image 175x136]
and telling them that they were holding the equivalent of 455,000 of those disks, and it costs $40

[upload.wikimedia.org image 850x671]
"Cartons of punched cards stored in a United States National Archives Records Service facility in 1959. Each carton could hold 2,000 cards."

According to the site that I can't locate at the moment, what's visible in that picture represents about 4GB of data.

Ah, here we go:

"There are about 20 rows of pallets visible, each row is 15 pallets wide, pallets are stacked two high (at least). Each pallet contains 45 boxes of punched cards. Standard card boxes contained 2000 cards. Each card held up to 80 characters, for a total of about 4.3 billion characters of data in this storage facility - about the same as a 4GB flash drive.


Excellent find!  I can't even imagine the cost should someone want to try to access that data.  "Bring your checkbook."
 
2021-06-18 9:11:41 AM  
Early 90s memory of an external SCSI hard drive with the then unheard of capacity of one gigabyte.  It was the size of a cinder block.
 
2021-06-18 9:29:27 AM  

Hate Tank: Early 90s memory of an external SCSI hard drive with the then unheard of capacity of one gigabyte.  It was the size of a cinder block.


I remember when they installed those at the USFS Atlanta office. They were bringing them into the office the same day that it was take your kid to work day, so I spent less time at my dad's desk and more time watching them connect them to the computers, and was wondering if my old ass computers could do something similar.

/Had a Tandy 1000 and a 286 at the time.
 
2021-06-18 9:38:28 AM  

Lighting: Imagine going back in time and handing them one of these
[Fark user image 175x136]
and telling them that they were holding the equivalent of 455,000 of those disks, and it costs $40


Where can you find a 1TB microSD for $40?  The one I have cost several hundred dollars.
 
2021-06-18 10:19:16 AM  

mjbok: Lighting: Imagine going back in time and handing them one of these
[Fark user image 175x136]
and telling them that they were holding the equivalent of 455,000 of those disks, and it costs $40

Where can you find a 1TB microSD for $40?  The one I have cost several hundred dollars.


1962 dollars? $40 then would be about $350 now.
 
2021-06-18 10:22:16 AM  
There was a 6 mb Corvis hard drive with a VCR tape drive for about $5,000 and network cards for an Apple ][ cost about $400 each in about 1983.  for i =1 to 65000;print chr(peek(i); next in proper basic would show you the users and their passwords. Passwords on the network were limited to 2 characters. That network was a RS422 like 1mb shared network.  The Lantastic cards a few years latter were nearly the same price and were only twice as fast in theory.
 
2021-06-18 10:29:51 AM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Farkenhostile: The first hard drive I ever bought was a 20 mb drive like this and it was for an 8086 someone gave me. I learned so much with that computer.
[Fark user image 850x478]
Then 286, 386,486 and then Pentium etc.

Waitasec...

...  Is that a CMI drive?

One of the infamous CMI ST-506 full height 20 MB drives as used in the first IBM ATs?

The drives that made *every possible* design mistake, so that if you crossed your eyes at it, it would crash and take all your data with it?

Can't be sure without seeing the back, but from as good a comparison as I can make, I'm now thinking, Nope, not a CMI.


I was just looking for a random MFM drive so people could see how big it was pretty much
 
2021-06-18 10:59:01 AM  

Ambitwistor: 1962 dollars? $40 then would be about $350 now.


Didn't account for inflation.  It does end up being about correct.
 
2021-06-18 11:28:14 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-18 1:06:36 PM  
In all fairness, programs were much smaller in code back then so a lot of programs could still fit on a circa 1962 floppy. Programmers keep clogging up ever-expanding disc space with loads of bloatcode in the attempt to look more smart.
 
2021-06-18 1:08:56 PM  

GreatGlavinsGhost: Lighting: Imagine going back in time and handing them one of these
[Fark user image 175x136]
and telling them that they were holding the equivalent of 455,000 of those disks, and it costs $40

[bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com image 600x396]


I want that mural on my wall in my Powerball Mansion. What's the source?
 
2021-06-18 1:14:58 PM  
NVM. I found it.
 
2021-06-18 1:42:56 PM  

fustanella: This is the bad boy I started out with. In today's terms it'd just hold a single MP3 - but couldn't, as it was divided into four volumes. Its soothing turbine sound acted as white-noise as I gently rested, knowing the BBS was in full swing.
[trs-80.com image 800x458]


If it'll work with a Model I and 3 and 4, then why won't it work with a model 2? What was so different about a model 2?
 
2021-06-18 2:08:38 PM  
I remember going to the Tandy store with my parents to buy a whopping 100MB drive for our Packard Bell. Once installed, it was partitioned off into 5 20MB partitions.

The Packard Bell was a replacement for our Apple IIe, which replaced the VIC-20 which had the optional cassette tape storage module attached.
 
2021-06-18 3:41:37 PM  

AAAAGGGGHHHH: GreatGlavinsGhost: Lighting: Imagine going back in time and handing them one of these
[Fark user image 175x136]
and telling them that they were holding the equivalent of 455,000 of those disks, and it costs $40

[bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com image 600x396]

I want that mural on my wall in my Powerball Mansion. What's the source?


Parks & Rec

Every Single PARKS & RECREATION Mural | Comedy Bites
Youtube Nrp0YejsCoE
 
2021-06-18 3:42:30 PM  
I started with this piece of crap. 40MB Hardcard ISA in a 286
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-18 5:12:35 PM  

ISO15693: Stringy-floppy will make a comeback.

[classic-computers.org.nz image 850x1161]


I wasted so much time with those before the belowmentioned hard drive. Utter shiate. I don't remember one lasting more than a month.
 
2021-06-18 5:15:26 PM  

AAAAGGGGHHHH: GreatGlavinsGhost: Lighting: Imagine going back in time and handing them one of these
[Fark user image 175x136]
and telling them that they were holding the equivalent of 455,000 of those disks, and it costs $40

[bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com image 600x396]

I want that mural on my wall in my Powerball Mansion. What's the source?


Actually, this is a better link.
 
2021-06-18 5:16:07 PM  

MetaDeth: fustanella: This is the bad boy I started out with. In today's terms it'd just hold a single MP3 - but couldn't, as it was divided into four volumes. Its soothing turbine sound acted as white-noise as I gently rested, knowing the BBS was in full swing.
[trs-80.com image 800x458]

If it'll work with a Model I and 3 and 4, then why won't it work with a model 2? What was so different about a model 2?


Different architecture. The II was the "business" machine with 8" floppy drives, whereas the I/III/4 were directly compatible with 5.25" ones. To your point, a different OS and more like an S-100, if memory serves.
 
2021-06-18 8:39:58 PM  

brainlordmesomorph: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Farkenhostile: The first hard drive I ever bought was a 20 mb drive like this and it was for an 8086 someone gave me. I learned so much with that computer.
[Fark user image 850x478]
Then 286, 386,486 and then Pentium etc.

Waitasec...

...  Is that a CMI drive?

One of the infamous CMI ST-506 full height 20 MB drives as used in the first IBM ATs?

The drives that made *every possible* design mistake, so that if you crossed your eyes at it, it would crash and take all your data with it?

Can't be sure without seeing the back, but from as good a comparison as I can make, I'm now thinking, Nope, not a CMI.

Wasn't the IBM one the "Winchester" drive?


The IBM "Winchester" was from an era long before PCs.  It was one of those huge washing-machine-sized floor-standing units.  It picked up the 'Winchester' monicker as a nickname because it had 30 MB fixed storage and 30 MB removable storage - abbreviated '30/30'.

Once ST-506 hard drives along the lines we would recognize started to appear - like the one pictured here - they were still occasionally called 'Winchester' disks, but that usage didn't last long.
 
2021-06-19 12:01:15 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: According to the site that I can't locate at the moment, what's visible in that picture represents about 4GB of data.


The real question is how many kilobytes/day you can read back from that.
 
2021-06-19 10:39:59 AM  

mjbok: Ambitwistor: 1962 dollars? $40 then would be about $350 now.

Didn't account for inflation.  It does end up being about correct.



Except, its $40 now, you need to divide to get to 1962 dollars.
 
2021-06-19 4:48:10 PM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2021-06-19 4:54:19 PM  

Hate Tank: Early 90s memory of an external SCSI hard drive with the then unheard of capacity of one gigabyte.  It was the size of a cinder block.


I have about half a dozen of those, right now. I was going to sell them on Ebay, but I never got around to it.

DON.MAC: I had a 86 meg drive that was about the same size.  I had to turn it on before the computer because the power surge would trip the circuit breaker.   It was a ST-506 drive that hooked to a SASI controller that was used as a prototype for an early SCSI interface.


I actually have an early 68000-based machine sitting in a box, somewhere. It has a 10MB, 5.25" inch, half height hard drive, and there's a SASI to MFM card mounted on top. The manufacturer is "WDC". I'm not sure if that's Western Digital or Western Design Center (the current manufacturers of the 65C02). I haven't booted it in a while, but last time I checked, it was still working.
 
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