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(Twitter)   A decade ago, the U.S. launched almost nothing of the world's commercial space launches. So what fraction did it launch in 2020? Oh my   (twitter.com) divider line
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1260 clicks; posted to STEM » on 10 Jun 2021 at 9:26 PM (4 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



14 Comments     (+0 »)
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5 days ago  
Original Tweet:

 
4 days ago  
This is where I poke my head in and say that with this kind of demand and interest rates this low and 50 trillion or whatever in investment capital floating around and accumulating in NFTs and bitcoin, maybe somebody should pony up for some other launch mode.

I know a space elevator will not work.. yet... but there are other technologies that require a lot of initial capital, but eventually more than pay for themselves. Chemical rockets are... nice for pay as you go... but the long-term economies could be better.

Time to start thinking big.
 
4 days ago  
There were a lot of people 10 years ago that had serious doubts about the commercial space program and the ability of SpaceX and others to be successful. Their doubt at the time were not unreasonable. I think if they were just trying to be the most profitable company they could they would not have succeeded. But having a loftier goal then just LEO helps.

The cancelation of the shuttle program, (albeit necessary) was such a dark time and a major step back in our capabilities. Falcon 9 is a fantastic rocket but it was always meant as a stepping stone to something greater. We are on the cusp of a fully re-useable heavy lift rocket with StarShip and SuperHeavy. Even if it never carries people it will be transformative technology.

I am glad that all those doubts 10 years ago proved to be unfounded and I cannot wait to see what the future holds.
 
4 days ago  
Ariana was pretty much shuttered last year in French Guyana
 
4 days ago  

khitsicker: There were a lot of people 10 years ago that had serious doubts about the commercial space program and the ability of SpaceX and others to be successful. Their doubt at the time were not unreasonable. I think if they were just trying to be the most profitable company they could they would not have succeeded. But having a loftier goal then just LEO helps.

The cancelation of the shuttle program, (albeit necessary) was such a dark time and a major step back in our capabilities. Falcon 9 is a fantastic rocket but it was always meant as a stepping stone to something greater. We are on the cusp of a fully re-useable heavy lift rocket with StarShip and SuperHeavy. Even if it never carries people it will be transformative technology.

I am glad that all those doubts 10 years ago proved to be unfounded and I cannot wait to see what the future holds.


It is a nice feeling, isn't it? Between Trump and COVID19 and financial follies, I have been pretty disappointed in humanity recently. It would be really nice to achieve something uplifting and pretty big.... for all mankind...

The baby steps are great and they are satisfying, but I wonder how the world would react to another GIANT LEAP or even having a decades long project to look forward to. The ISS is getting older already. Keeping it going as a life raft or fueling station for bigger things is a chance we should not squander.

We should move along to the next big thing.
 
4 days ago  
A little competition in the market does wonders.  ULA sat there fat dumb and happy with their sole source national security contracts.  Then SpaceX came in and ate their lunch.
 
4 days ago  

khitsicker: There were a lot of people 10 years ago that had serious doubts about the commercial space program and the ability of SpaceX and others to be successful. Their doubt at the time were not unreasonable. I think if they were just trying to be the most profitable company they could they would not have succeeded. But having a loftier goal then just LEO helps.

The cancelation of the shuttle program, (albeit necessary) was such a dark time and a major step back in our capabilities. Falcon 9 is a fantastic rocket but it was always meant as a stepping stone to something greater. We are on the cusp of a fully re-useable heavy lift rocket with StarShip and SuperHeavy. Even if it never carries people it will be transformative technology.

I am glad that all those doubts 10 years ago proved to be unfounded and I cannot wait to see what the future holds.


Well Said.
 
4 days ago  
Enough satellites orbiting Earf should shade us enough to cancel out global warming.
 
4 days ago  

2fardownthread: This is where I poke my head in and say that with this kind of demand and interest rates this low and 50 trillion or whatever in investment capital floating around and accumulating in NFTs and bitcoin, maybe somebody should pony up for some other launch mode.

I know a space elevator will not work.. yet... but there are other technologies that require a lot of initial capital, but eventually more than pay for themselves. Chemical rockets are... nice for pay as you go... but the long-term economies could be better.

Time to start thinking big.


I think we need a great competition again to really drive our push towards the stars. Without the Cold War, we'd never have the space race because there wasn't a consensus that we should even bother exploring space.

Hopefully the new round of increased sci-fi interest in media (gaming is seeing a massive resurgence in space games that I haven't seen since the 90s, star wars/trek and the Expanse has reinvigorated the sci-fi genre in movies and tv) will spur on another generation of wild eyed youngsters who want to explore the stars like I did as a kid reading sci-fi and playing space games, as did my dad when he was a kid during the early days of the Space Race.

/I'm an engineer now working on new tech
//My dad became an earth science teacher and taught his students both an intro into the mysteries of the universe, but also about the mysteries about earth.
///*Hums TOS theme*
 
4 days ago  

Original: Original Tweet:

SciGuySpace: New data from @BryceSpaceTech: U.S. rockets launched three-quarters of all commercial missions in 2020. Even if you subtract Starlink missions, it's still two-thirds. A decade ago, before the Falcon 9, the number was effectively zero. Electron helps too. https://t.co/KfpN78XrEn


Nothing like free government money to get things rolling again
 
4 days ago  

2fardownthread: This is where I poke my head in and say that with this kind of demand and interest rates this low and 50 trillion or whatever in investment capital floating around and accumulating in NFTs and bitcoin, maybe somebody should pony up for some other launch mode.

I know a space elevator will not work.. yet... but there are other technologies that require a lot of initial capital, but eventually more than pay for themselves. Chemical rockets are... nice for pay as you go... but the long-term economies could be better.

Time to start thinking big.


Why use private money when there is plenty of free government money??
 
4 days ago  

khitsicker: There were a lot of people 10 years ago that had serious doubts about the commercial space program and the ability of SpaceX and others to be successful. Their doubt at the time were not unreasonable. I think if they were just trying to be the most profitable company they could they would not have succeeded. But having a loftier goal then just LEO helps.

The cancelation of the shuttle program, (albeit necessary) was such a dark time and a major step back in our capabilities. Falcon 9 is a fantastic rocket but it was always meant as a stepping stone to something greater. We are on the cusp of a fully re-useable heavy lift rocket with StarShip and SuperHeavy. Even if it never carries people it will be transformative technology.

I am glad that all those doubts 10 years ago proved to be unfounded and I cannot wait to see what the future holds.


The future holds more free government money for space and more free capital gains money for space company stock owners.

While the nations democracy and middle class fades away....
 
4 days ago  
Damn you, capitalism and competition.
 
4 days ago  
Said it before, and I'll say it again.  One of the best ways we can become a competitive nation again:  Give the entire US military a 10% haircut.  Split it evenly between the Dept of Education, NSF and NASA.
 
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