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(No Tech Magazine)   Cartoonishly obsolete technology is more effective than battery powered hearing aids. ...I SAID CARTOONISHLY oh whatever just read this   (notechmagazine.com) divider line
    More: PSA, Audiology, Ear, Sensorineural hearing loss, Sound, Otology, 2nd millennium, hearing aids, Hearing aid  
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1350 clicks; posted to STEM » on 10 Jun 2021 at 2:30 PM (11 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



24 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-06-10 12:10:27 PM  
I think this would clutter up a theater:

4.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size


Modern aids can work much better with proper diagnosis and fitting.
 
2021-06-10 1:26:45 PM  
I suspect a very hide-bound captive market that both massively over-prices and under-delivers because medical mumbo-jumbo and FARK you, that why.

Meanwhile stem cell therapy of hair cell replacement 404 not found because cures aren't allowed.
 
2021-06-10 2:33:29 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-10 2:37:52 PM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2021-06-10 2:47:14 PM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: I suspect a very hide-bound captive market that both massively over-prices and under-delivers because medical mumbo-jumbo and FARK you, that why.

Meanwhile stem cell therapy of hair cell replacement 404 not found because cures aren't allowed.


In spite of Congress asking them about 3 years ago to establish a category of OTC hearing aids, the FDA happily points out, "At this time, there are no products that can claim to address hearing loss that are, or can claim to be OTC hearing aids within the meaning of section 520(q) of the FD&C Act as amended by FDARA."

I've had pretty major hearing loss in one ear since about 3rd grade - probably from nerve or other inner ear damage from childhood ear infections from poor drainage.  It seems like people inevitably want to stand on that side to have a quiet conversation with me in a noisy environment.

Anyway, one category of "weird thing" I've found to be really helpful is (a) auto-level amplifying hunting/shooting headphones and (b) high quality [Bose] active noise cancelling headphones.  (a) actually works best for me but are not as socially acceptable as (b).   With (a) I can crank the volume to max if necessary but it will limit the sound pressure level to prevent hearing damage.
 
2021-06-10 2:56:33 PM  

SansNeural: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: I suspect a very hide-bound captive market that both massively over-prices and under-delivers because medical mumbo-jumbo and FARK you, that why.

Meanwhile stem cell therapy of hair cell replacement 404 not found because cures aren't allowed.

In spite of Congress asking them about 3 years ago to establish a category of OTC hearing aids, the FDA happily points out, "At this time, there are no products that can claim to address hearing loss that are, or can claim to be OTC hearing aids within the meaning of section 520(q) of the FD&C Act as amended by FDARA."

I've had pretty major hearing loss in one ear since about 3rd grade - probably from nerve or other inner ear damage from childhood ear infections from poor drainage.  It seems like people inevitably want to stand on that side to have a quiet conversation with me in a noisy environment.

Anyway, one category of "weird thing" I've found to be really helpful is (a) auto-level amplifying hunting/shooting headphones and (b) high quality [Bose] active noise cancelling headphones.  (a) actually works best for me but are not as socially acceptable as (b).   With (a) I can crank the volume to max if necessary but it will limit the sound pressure level to prevent hearing damage.


Username checks out.
 
2021-06-10 3:07:16 PM  
I'm sort of sad for subby thinking that old = obsolete.  Simple is often better.

With modern materials and manufacturing I'm betting one skilled in the art and sufficiently motivated could create a reasonable looking sound horn attached to a glasses frame that amplified the sound of whatever you were looking at with bone conduction so that it doesn't actually block your ears.

/subby's mom is definitely not obsolete
 
2021-06-10 3:13:27 PM  

SansNeural: In spite of Congress asking them about 3 years ago to establish a category of OTC hearing aids, the FDA happily points out, "At this time, there are no products that can claim to address hearing loss that are, or can claim to be OTC hearing aids within the meaning of section 520(q) of the FD&C Act as amended by FDARA."



There are some issues with OTC aids. One of the worst cases would be just adding gain without limit. You could attain damaging sound levels, making the problem worse.

All aids are custom-fitted to your physical ears. This is a mold process that can't be done safely as a DIY.  Without this mold, sound can leak from the speaker back to the microphone, resulting in feedback. If you have a high-frequency loss, you might not even notice it, but it's still banging away at delicate parts - and everyone around you will notice.

Self-diagnosis is seldom a good idea. Most (all?) states have rules requiring hearing-aid salespeople refer certain issues to a professional.

DIY setting of a broken arm is not advised. The same goes for any medical issue.

/But do look for a reputable dealer - there are some under-trained people out there.
 
2021-06-10 3:20:16 PM  
I don't understand the why of it, but apparently it's very difficult to isolate sounds from an amplified source.  With good hearing, you can stand in a crowded room full of talking people and still focus on the voice in front of you.  This doesn't work nearly as well with hearing aids.

I have to wonder if anyone's played around with making hearing aids more directional, maybe with some intelligence to boost background volume when there's nothing significant coming in from the directional mics.

Or even beyond that, just mount the mics in the frames of a pair of glasses.  By the time you need hearing aids you almost always need glasses anyway.  Then you'd have a nice solid base aimed at whatever is right in front of your face without worrying if a device has shifted in your ear.
 
2021-06-10 3:35:09 PM  
I don't have a hearing aid. Hearing aids require professional fitting and attempt to process sound in a way that the professional thinks would work better for the patient, who just has to get used to it.  And being $4-8,000 poorer.

I have a $150 personal amplifier, which has five levels of boost (I use the lowest level), three choices of noise reduction (again, the lowest level) and (OMG!) has a super-duper impossible to put in a hearing aid, rechargeable battery.

One weird side effect of the noise reduction circuit: I can "hear" ultrasonics, if they are loud enough.  The noise reduction just clicks and shuts off until the noise stops.  Very good for testing dog whistles.
 
2021-06-10 3:43:04 PM  
I might add, after reading some earlier comments, my amp does not have a custom sound-blocking earpiece, in fact the earpiece is designed to allow ambient sound to bypass the amp.  Only sound coming from directly in front gets boosted.  The noise-reduction circuit blocks any feedback.  It's very well-designed and obviously not by an American company.
 
2021-06-10 3:50:15 PM  

natazha: I might add, after reading some earlier comments, my amp does not have a custom sound-blocking earpiece, in fact the earpiece is designed to allow ambient sound to bypass the amp.  Only sound coming from directly in front gets boosted.  The noise-reduction circuit blocks any feedback.  It's very well-designed and obviously not by an American company.


I'm curious - care to share a make and model? I'd like to see that setup.
 
2021-06-10 4:12:56 PM  
Looney Tunes - Now Hear This (1963) Opening Title & Closing [Golden Collection Volume 6]
Youtube Um3HwMmmbc4
 
2021-06-10 4:15:25 PM  
Ignorant Luddites say what? I couldn't do my job without the electronics in my hearing aids, and customizing the frequency response to my hearing-loss curve is just the start.

BTW, not all hearing aids require professional fitting. I wear receiver-in-canal aids with open domes, and it was just a matter of selecting the most comfortable dome.
 
2021-06-10 4:32:50 PM  
pbs.twimg.comView Full Size
 
2021-06-10 4:42:52 PM  

common sense is an oxymoron: customizing the frequency response to my hearing-loss curve is just the start.


Which is another thing I wonder about.  Rather than boosting the volume in the frequency ranges you've lost, I wonder if anyone's ever tried frequency shifting to move to the ranges you have left?

You need 85Hz to 255Hz to hear human voices, but the human ear starts with a sensitivity range from 20Hz to 20kHz.  Sure, the high end's gone, but what about bumping things down a dozen Hz or so?  Everyone might sound weird, but you'd actually hear them.
 
2021-06-10 5:10:10 PM  

Unsung_Hero: common sense is an oxymoron: customizing the frequency response to my hearing-loss curve is just the start.

Which is another thing I wonder about.  Rather than boosting the volume in the frequency ranges you've lost, I wonder if anyone's ever tried frequency shifting to move to the ranges you have left?

You need 85Hz to 255Hz to hear human voices, but the human ear starts with a sensitivity range from 20Hz to 20kHz.  Sure, the high end's gone, but what about bumping things down a dozen Hz or so?  Everyone might sound weird, but you'd actually hear them.


YMMV, but if I only needed 255 Hz to distinguish an S from an F then I wouldn't need hearing aids. I need to hear up to at least 6 KHz to transcribe accurately. As for transposing the higher frequencies, my new ones bump 10-20KHz down an octave, which definitely helps.
 
2021-06-10 5:12:10 PM  

Unsung_Hero: common sense is an oxymoron: customizing the frequency response to my hearing-loss curve is just the start.

Which is another thing I wonder about.  Rather than boosting the volume in the frequency ranges you've lost, I wonder if anyone's ever tried frequency shifting to move to the ranges you have left?

You need 85Hz to 255Hz to hear human voices, but the human ear starts with a sensitivity range from 20Hz to 20kHz.  Sure, the high end's gone, but what about bumping things down a dozen Hz or so?  Everyone might sound weird, but you'd actually hear them.


I have read 'verts for hearing aids that claim to employ DSP for both frequency compensation ("equalizer" style boosting) and dynamic noise reduction.  Of course they claim to be all sorts of wonderful but I haven't yet been inspired to spend my HSA money on a huge deductible to find out just how good.

My "bad" ear has lost low-frequency sensitivity and so far both ears seem to be fine picking up the highs.  I do have difficulty conversing in people-noisy environments, but I've decided that's mostly a processing issue - my brain wants to follow *all* the conversations and other noisy things going on so I wind up following nothing and becoming frustrated.

That last thing was actually a revelation contrary to my thinking since childhood that I was a shy, anti-people person.  Turns out that in loud parties or crowds my brain kind of scrambles and I feel all sorts of anxiety... pretty much all down to how my brain fails to process sound.
 
2021-06-10 5:16:48 PM  

jasonvatch: SansNeural: In spite of Congress asking them about 3 years ago to establish a category of OTC hearing aids, the FDA happily points out, "At this time, there are no products that can claim to address hearing loss that are, or can claim to be OTC hearing aids within the meaning of section 520(q) of the FD&C Act as amended by FDARA."
There are some issues with OTC aids. One of the worst cases would be just adding gain without limit. You could attain damaging sound levels, making the problem worse.
All aids are custom-fitted to your physical ears. This is a mold process that can't be done safely as a DIY.  Without this mold, sound can leak from the speaker back to the microphone, resulting in feedback. If you have a high-frequency loss, you might not even notice it, but it's still banging away at delicate parts - and everyone around you will notice.
Self-diagnosis is seldom a good idea. Most (all?) states have rules requiring hearing-aid salespeople refer certain issues to a professional.
DIY setting of a broken arm is not advised. The same goes for any medical issue.
/But do look for a reputable dealer - there are some under-trained people out there.


They sell them over the internet. And in Wal-Mart. That sounds about as good (ha) as buying braces from TV.
Might work, but there's a reason they use highly-trained professionals.
 
2021-06-10 5:17:32 PM  

common sense is an oxymoron: my new ones bump 10-20KHz down an octave, which definitely helps.


And now I have to get silly, because I'm out of serious things to say on this subject.

Autotune ought to be an option for hearing aids.  Imagine how musical your world could be with everyone talking in the same key.
 
2021-06-10 5:38:05 PM  
The explanation seems simple to me.

If you have a big horn stuck out of your ear, then other people just talk to you louder.

If you wear a hearing aid that they can't see, then they expect you to hear them.
 
2021-06-10 6:59:04 PM  
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2021-06-10 8:18:32 PM  

RogermcAllen: I'm sort of sad for subby thinking that old = obsolete.  Simple is often better.

With modern materials and manufacturing I'm betting one skilled in the art and sufficiently motivated could create a reasonable looking sound horn attached to a glasses frame that amplified the sound of whatever you were looking at with bone conduction so that it doesn't actually block your ears.

/subby's mom is definitely not obsolete


She sure can conduct the bone.
 
2021-06-10 9:36:54 PM  

RogermcAllen: I'm sort of sad for subby thinking that old = obsolete.


common sense is an oxymoron: Ignorant Luddites say what? I couldn't do my job without the electronics in my hearing aids,


muahhhh hahahahahaaaaa

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