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(YouTube)   Wanna see what it looks like when you pop a 5000A fuse?   (youtube.com) divider line
    More: Amusing  
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1452 clicks; posted to STEM » on 10 Jun 2021 at 2:08 PM (11 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



23 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-06-10 10:29:40 AM  
Approves.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-10 10:50:05 AM  
That guy hasn't posted stuff in years.  I thought he fried himself in some hideous accident.
 
2021-06-10 10:53:31 AM  

markie_farkie: That guy hasn't posted stuff in years.  I thought he fried himself in some hideous accident.


i am so glad that he is back.  the 20,000w light bulb is my fav.
 
2021-06-10 11:11:01 AM  
Hasn't quite got the showmanship of Hydraulic Press Channel.  I mean, the guy's obviously a serious engineer, but the build is pretty boring, and the final fuse pop event is rather underwhelming.
 
2021-06-10 12:07:54 PM  

Mad Scientist: final fuse pop event is rather underwhelming.


Go back and watch some of his other stuff.  Also, he holds the title of being the first person to upload the Brick In Spin Cycle Washing Machine bit, or so he claims.  Others may have done it before YouTube existed, tho..

Some of the pure carnage vids where he pumps 500 volts into a waffle iron or vacuum cleaner, etc are pretty spectacular when they finally self-destruct.
 
2021-06-10 12:13:55 PM  
Years ago I was at the Munich Science Museum's high energy electricity exhibit, and they vaporized a 2 meter long copper rod about as thick as a hotdog with some massive amount of electricity.  Everyone had to wear hearing protection, despite the visitors being on the other side of a massive 2 inch thick tempered glass wall.

It sounded and felt like being directly under a lightning bolt, and living to tell about it.

/end Charged Story, Bro
 
2021-06-10 1:35:34 PM  

markie_farkie: Go back and watch some of his other stuff.


I certainly will.  He's new to me.
 
2021-06-10 2:24:12 PM  
How about a 5 second video instead of an 18 minute one.
 
2021-06-10 2:27:54 PM  

flamark: How about a 5 second video instead of an 18 minute one.


Exactly. I'll be happy with a 2 minute one.
 
2021-06-10 2:28:04 PM  
There was a great surplus place in town when I was in college.  Thousands of square feet, on 4 different floors, of just about anything.  The EE students would go down there to find cool stuff to use in projects.

One time we found a bunch of capacitors rated at 350,000 µF.  One third of a Farad.  Nearly the size of a car battery.  We were used to things in the pico- to micro- range.

We thought about buying 3 of them and hooking them in parallel, just so that we could say we had an entire Farad.

Don't recall the voltage rating, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was pretty low, so it's not like we could have used it to store much energy.
 
2021-06-10 2:58:39 PM  

Mad Scientist: Hasn't quite got the showmanship of Hydraulic Press Channel.  I mean, the guy's obviously a serious engineer, but the build is pretty boring, and the final fuse pop event is rather underwhelming.


You mean the content of the video..? Because hydraulic press dude is pretty unwatchable as far as "showmanship" goes.
 
2021-06-10 3:26:24 PM  
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2021-06-10 3:27:31 PM  
I suspect that's how it looked when my dad was installing a telephone switching system in the 1950s and unthinking laid a heavy duty screwdriver across two bus bars.  Nothing was left but the handle.
 
2021-06-10 3:35:35 PM  

Raoul Eaton: I suspect that's how it looked when my dad was installing a telephone switching system in the 1950s and unthinking laid a heavy duty screwdriver across two bus bars.  Nothing was left but the handle.


Yeah, all the ancient telco crap was 48VDC, so the amperages involved were enormous.  I still remember visiting some smaller central offices in rural CA back in the late 90s, and most of the core switching infrastructure was connected to massive battery banks that were fed by a transformer, so there was always continual power available even if the street power failed, and there was some time in getting a generator fired up.

The main bus panel bars were about as thick as railroad tracks, and the main battery bank feed wires to the bus bar were about twice as thick as a garden hose.

Shorting those out would pass well over 10,000 amps through whatever was there until it melted.
 
2021-06-10 4:11:15 PM  

markie_farkie: Raoul Eaton: I suspect that's how it looked when my dad was installing a telephone switching system in the 1950s and unthinking laid a heavy duty screwdriver across two bus bars.  Nothing was left but the handle.

Yeah, all the ancient telco crap was 48VDC, so the amperages involved were enormous.  I still remember visiting some smaller central offices in rural CA back in the late 90s, and most of the core switching infrastructure was connected to massive battery banks that were fed by a transformer, so there was always continual power available even if the street power failed, and there was some time in getting a generator fired up.

The main bus panel bars were about as thick as railroad tracks, and the main battery bank feed wires to the bus bar were about twice as thick as a garden hose.

Shorting those out would pass well over 10,000 amps through whatever was there until it melted.


As someone who still uses a bunch of Telco gear at 48 VDC, can confirm.  The mains bars are....massive.  And you can hear if you listen carefully if things are nearing failure time.
 
2021-06-10 4:25:26 PM  

FrancoFile: There was a great surplus place in town when I was in college.  Thousands of square feet, on 4 different floors, of just about anything.  The EE students would go down there to find cool stuff to use in projects.

One time we found a bunch of capacitors rated at 350,000 µF.  One third of a Farad.  Nearly the size of a car battery.  We were used to things in the pico- to micro- range.

We thought about buying 3 of them and hooking them in parallel, just so that we could say we had an entire Farad.

Don't recall the voltage rating, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was pretty low, so it's not like we could have used it to store much energy.



I have a 1 Farad electrolytic capacitor.

It's rated for 12V usage.  They're meant to supplement powered subwoofers in cars, where you can't reasonably expect the battery cables deal with the really loud "thumps", so they get used to pick up the slack.

I don't use it for such mundane things of course.   Once I wound a coil of 8 gauge copper wire, placed a cylindrical neodymium magnet in it, and let the 1 F capacitor short it out.

I never found the magnet.  There seemed to be bits of magnet dust around though.

Anyway, since energy in a capacitor goes linearly with capacitance but square with the voltage, higher voltage capacitors tend to be better for destruction.  Unfortunately their ability to kill you goes up just as dramatically.
 
2021-06-10 4:49:54 PM  

Mad Scientist: Hasn't quite got the showmanship of Hydraulic Press Channel.  I mean, the guy's obviously a serious engineer, but the build is pretty boring, and the final fuse pop event is rather underwhelming.


I used to love the Hydraulic Press Channel but now I rarely watch it, and when I do I skip most of the video to get to the good part as if it was a porn movie.
 
2021-06-10 5:01:02 PM  

Deathbymeteor: markie_farkie: Raoul Eaton: I suspect that's how it looked when my dad was installing a telephone switching system in the 1950s and unthinking laid a heavy duty screwdriver across two bus bars.  Nothing was left but the handle.

Yeah, all the ancient telco crap was 48VDC, so the amperages involved were enormous.  I still remember visiting some smaller central offices in rural CA back in the late 90s, and most of the core switching infrastructure was connected to massive battery banks that were fed by a transformer, so there was always continual power available even if the street power failed, and there was some time in getting a generator fired up.

The main bus panel bars were about as thick as railroad tracks, and the main battery bank feed wires to the bus bar were about twice as thick as a garden hose.

Shorting those out would pass well over 10,000 amps through whatever was there until it melted.

As someone who still uses a bunch of Telco gear at 48 VDC, can confirm.  The mains bars are....massive.  And you can hear if you listen carefully if things are nearing failure time.


-48v equipment isn't being moved out of COs any time soon.  Current generation of equipment going in right now is all -48v.  Has to do with NEC waivers - you have to install significantly more fire suppression systems if you don't make all your gear in the telco space of a CO -48v. Would be very costly and ends up decreasing network reliability.  There are isolation requirements if you want 120v platforms - essentially the room with 120v/240v equipment needs to be able to burn out and not take out the telco gear.
 
2021-06-10 5:24:13 PM  
Brilliant way to electrocute yourself.
 
2021-06-10 6:58:13 PM  

MadHatter500: Deathbymeteor: markie_farkie: Raoul Eaton: I suspect that's how it looked when my dad was installing a telephone switching system in the 1950s and unthinking laid a heavy duty screwdriver across two bus bars.  Nothing was left but the handle.

Yeah, all the ancient telco crap was 48VDC, so the amperages involved were enormous.  I still remember visiting some smaller central offices in rural CA back in the late 90s, and most of the core switching infrastructure was connected to massive battery banks that were fed by a transformer, so there was always continual power available even if the street power failed, and there was some time in getting a generator fired up.

The main bus panel bars were about as thick as railroad tracks, and the main battery bank feed wires to the bus bar were about twice as thick as a garden hose.

Shorting those out would pass well over 10,000 amps through whatever was there until it melted.

As someone who still uses a bunch of Telco gear at 48 VDC, can confirm.  The mains bars are....massive.  And you can hear if you listen carefully if things are nearing failure time.

-48v equipment isn't being moved out of COs any time soon.  Current generation of equipment going in right now is all -48v.  Has to do with NEC waivers - you have to install significantly more fire suppression systems if you don't make all your gear in the telco space of a CO -48v. Would be very costly and ends up decreasing network reliability.  There are isolation requirements if you want 120v platforms - essentially the room with 120v/240v equipment needs to be able to burn out and not take out the telco gear.


Oh I know.  Fortunately, the telephony side of our CO's is isolated from the remaining transport gear, so failure would need to be really widespread to cross the gap between them.

Still amuses me when people outside telecom talk about the advances in networks and you realize how much of it still runs on decades old platforms
 
2021-06-10 6:59:19 PM  

CluelessMoron: FrancoFile: There was a great surplus place in town when I was in college.  Thousands of square feet, on 4 different floors, of just about anything.  The EE students would go down there to find cool stuff to use in projects.

One time we found a bunch of capacitors rated at 350,000 µF.  One third of a Farad.  Nearly the size of a car battery.  We were used to things in the pico- to micro- range.

We thought about buying 3 of them and hooking them in parallel, just so that we could say we had an entire Farad.

Don't recall the voltage rating, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was pretty low, so it's not like we could have used it to store much energy.


I have a 1 Farad electrolytic capacitor.

It's rated for 12V usage.  They're meant to supplement powered subwoofers in cars, where you can't reasonably expect the battery cables deal with the really loud "thumps", so they get used to pick up the slack.

I don't use it for such mundane things of course.   Once I wound a coil of 8 gauge copper wire, placed a cylindrical neodymium magnet in it, and let the 1 F capacitor short it out.

I never found the magnet.  There seemed to be bits of magnet dust around though.

Anyway, since energy in a capacitor goes linearly with capacitance but square with the voltage, higher voltage capacitors tend to be better for destruction.  Unfortunately their ability to kill you goes up just as dramatically.


EE prof walks into our 8am 'final project' class carrying a 1 farad cap. He proceeded to ask us for 120V rated diodes and for banana clip leads for plugging into the bus lining our wall. He proceeds to twist together a bridge to charge the cap.

An hour later he unplugs it. Starts looking for something to short it with. Chalkboards were being removed before next semester. He shorts the cap on the aluminum chalk tray.

Blew a chunk off of the tray. He was fun.
 
2021-06-10 7:53:09 PM  
Since another memory came out of nowhere with that prof:

2 other students were working in the lab one day. Unplugged the bandanna clips off of their project, but omitted to pull them out of the bus. Whats the worst that can happen, right? Clips touch each other, flash of light, sparks, trips breaker. Melted the clips together.

Professor was all for learning by failure. Mistakes are fine as long as you learn something. He stays cool and collected after while asking if everyone is alright.

After that he just says 'we don't arc weld in the lab, ok?'
 
2021-06-10 8:01:52 PM  

Raoul Eaton: I suspect that's how it looked when my dad was installing a telephone switching system in the 1950s and unthinking laid a heavy duty screwdriver across two bus bars.  Nothing was left but the handle.


It's still almost all -48v. Each time they sent me to power school the instructor would ask what we hoped to learn. I would always say "What to do to not blow up." (laughs) "No. Seriously."
 
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