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(Eat This Not That)   The thing you're not doing right today? Making pizza. Fark: you're messing it up 20 different ways. If you want to take advice from a site that says 00 flour is both high in gluten and low in protein   (eatthis.com) divider line
    More: Asinine, Baking, Pizza, pizza lovers, Chef Stephanie Harris-Uyidicautions, Bread, pizza dough, Executive Chef, favorite pizza joint  
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423 clicks; posted to Food » on 10 Jun 2021 at 3:25 AM (5 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



48 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
5 days ago  
Every time I see an Eat This Not That website linked that I'm tempted to click on I throw another premixed spice down the disposal instead.
 
5 days ago  
The only one of those I'd agree with is preheating the oven.  The rest (including the baking stone) is preference.  You'll still get pizza.
 
5 days ago  
My first try:

Fark user imageView Full Size

cheap phone camera
 
5 days ago  
I made Detroit pizza for the first time recently.  I didn't buy a special pan, I did in a 9x13 baking pan.  I used regular flour.  I used Monterey Jack instead of Brick cheese, because we can't get Brick here.  I put cheap-ass locally IGA-available pepperoni on it, and also the cheap-ass mozzarella (IGA brand)

Best. F*cking. Pizza. I. EVAR. Made.  And I don't generally like deep dish pizza.

tl, dr ; While you can mess up pizza, it's not rocket science. Don't overthink it.
 
5 days ago  
Just buy Chicago style over New York style.
 
5 days ago  
The thing I'm not doing right is not driving to the author's house and beating them until candy comes out.
 
5 days ago  

Ragin' Asian: The thing I'm not doing right is not driving to the author's house and beating them until candy comes out.


Username checks out.
 
5 days ago  

AsparagusFTW: Just buy Chicago style over New York style.


If I wanted casserole, I'd make a casserole.
 
5 days ago  
The thing you're not doing right today? Making pizza. Fark: you're messing it up 20 different ways. If you want to take advice from a site that says 00 flour is both high in gluten and low in protein Greenlighting Fark submissions

ETNT delenda est.
 
5 days ago  
That article fails in so many ways.

I use Puck's dough recipe. Oven at 500. Seven minutes on a cast iron skillet. A minute or so then on the stove top to crisp up the crust like Pepe's.
 
5 days ago  

AsparagusFTW: Just buy Chicago style over New York style.


wanna-joke.comView Full Size
 
5 days ago  
I use Alton Brown's dough recipe, and you add all the water at once to the dry ingredients, along with the oil.  Works like a charm.

TFA is, as per usual on that stupid website, half "duh" and half misinformation or dubious opinion.

ANY kind of baking, you need to preheat the oven.
ANY kind of cooking, you need to prep your ingredients.
ANY kind of yeast dough, you need to pay attention to temperature, allow it to rise and/or cold ferment, etc.
 
5 days ago  
I haven't tried this Digiorno but I thought I might experiment with the pillsbury crescent sheets as crust and try making my own

d2d8wwwkmhfcva.cloudfront.netView Full Size
 
5 days ago  
I'm sad to say I do #2 more often than not, eschewing home made dough due to lack of time when I'm tired. I still make my own occasionally, but frankly -- I'm tired and just want pizza.

One area where I will not skimp is toppings. I canned about 3 gallons of sauce with veggies from the garden last fall, so no store bought stuff. La Quercia meats from Norwalk, IA, and cheese from Milton Creamery in Milton, IA. Keepin' it local and classy.

Totino's when I'm drunk.
 
5 days ago  
I bake a lot but suck at kneading.
my bread machine does the work of making the dough, I divide it up into 3, bag it then freeze it
I have pizza anytime I want. It just takes putting a bag of frozen dough to thaw in the fridge over night
I also roll it out but use a heavy marble rolling pin. I also like thin crust, so you might want to divide it in half.

pizza dough for bread machine:

1 cup water
3/4 tsp salt
4 tsp canola oil
3 cups flour
1 and 1/4 tsp bread machine yeast
 
5 days ago  
So, apparently the biggest mistake you make with pizza is NOT being a professional with a dedicated line and professional grade equipment.

Give it a rest. Not everyone is looking at making authentic Napoletana or Sicilian.

This is the crap that annoys me as a chef. This sort of snobbery turns people away from trying new stuff. From learning through trial and error.

In a professional kitchen, yes, having a background in the cuisine is important for authenticity and to learn proper technique. You can't break the rules until you understand their foundations. But for a home cook, try to have fun. Learn all you can, certainly, because it will improve your results, and it gives you a wider base to try new stuff. Mistakes teach us, but if they're edible and you had a good time, drive on.

Cooking is fun. These Mrs Grundys are moon faced assassins of joy.
 
5 days ago  
hubiestubert:
In a professional kitchen, yes, having a background in the cuisine is important for authenticity and to learn proper technique. You can't break the rules until you understand their foundations. But for a home cook, try to have fun. Learn all you can, certainly, because it will improve your results, and it gives you a wider base to try new stuff. Mistakes teach us, but if they're edible and you had a good time, drive on.

Cooking is fun. These Mrs Grundys are moon faced assassins of joy.


Freedom comes when you tell Mrs Grundy to go fly a kite - Timothy Leary
 
5 days ago  
"00" flour is a dumb choice for making pizza in a home oven. If you have a special pizza oven that can reach 900F and you want to make Neapolitan pizza, use "00". You will get the charred spots that style of pizza is known for. If you do it in a low temperature home oven your pizza crust will be totally pale. If you want a nice brown crust you will need to increase the sugar and oil content of your dough. You can simply add white sugar but that doesn't bring much to the table in terms of flavor and can add too much sweetness if you get the rations wrong. Malted barley has enzymes that will convert the starches into simple sugars that will brown up nicely as well add a bit more complexity to the flavor. If you are thinking malted barley is a specialty ingredient that is hard to find that you're not going to bother with, don't fret. Use King Arthur bread flour. It's unbleached wheat flour with malted barley and is readily available in just about every grocery store. For no fuss pizza dough, it's perfect.
 
5 days ago  
Should I use rings or chunks of pineapple?
 
5 days ago  

mikey15: Should I use rings or chunks of pineapple?


Pineapple AND anchovies!
 
5 days ago  

Laobaojun: mikey15: Should I use rings or chunks of pineapple?

Pineapple AND anchovies!


rings or chunks of anchovy
 
5 days ago  

jasonvatch: My first try:

[Fark user image 850x1133]
cheap phone camera


Looks like a good first try; I'd eat that.  Though the dough looks a little more dense/less chewy than I normally like it.  The cheese is nicely browned.
 
5 days ago  
My first secret is to make an extra spicy sauce and freeze it in o e pizza portions for when I get the urge to make pizza. My second secret is to get some spicy Italian sausages and grill them for future pizza when I am grilling steaks or whatever for the now. when it is pizza time a day or two later, I slice up the sausages for an awesome topping that won't leak too much on the pizza since they were previously grilled. My third secret is to get premade dough, but not the crap in the can. That stuff sucks.
 
5 days ago  
How exactly does a pizza stone get hotter than the over it's in?
 
5 days ago  
Great pizza dough isn't rocket surgery. If you have a stand mixer and a kitchen scale, it's pretty simple.

500g flour (I typically use 250g of AP, and 250g of bread flour)
325g water
2 Tbls EVOO
10g fine sea salt
4g active dried yeast

Add flour, water, and oil to mixing bowl. Mix on low speed with dough hook attachment for 1 minute or until just combined. Cover and let rest for about 10 minutes so the water can be absorbed into the flour. Add salt and yeast and mix on a medium speed with dough hook for 6 minutes. This will be the kneading part. Turn out on to a lightly floured surface and hand knead for about 1 min, just to get it to a smooth ball. Oil the mixing bowl and put the dough in. Cover and let it rest for about an hour and a half, or two. Divide the dough into 3 portions and make into smooth balls, put into greased containers. Put these in the fridge for at least 24 hours, but prefer 3 days (I've gone up to 6 days, but that's about as far as I would take it)

This makes an outstanding and very flavorful pizza crust.
 
5 days ago  

Farnn: How exactly does a pizza stone get hotter than the over it's in?


It doesn't. It has a much higher specific heat capacity than the air in the oven. Meaning it can transfer more energy to the pizza than the air. It's the same reason you can stick your hand in a 400 degree oven for several seconds without getting burned but just splash a bit of boiling water on yourself your going to be in a world of pain.
 
5 days ago  

Farnn: How exactly does a pizza stone get hotter than the over it's in?


It doesn't. However, a stone or steel will transfer its heat to the dough much more efficiently than if it was either just put in on the rack to air cook, or if put onto an unheated pan then placed in the oven.
 
5 days ago  

cookiedough: I bake a lot but suck at kneading.
my bread machine does the work of making the dough, I divide it up into 3, bag it then freeze it
I have pizza anytime I want. It just takes putting a bag of frozen dough to thaw in the fridge over night
I also roll it out but use a heavy marble rolling pin. I also like thin crust, so you might want to divide it in half.

pizza dough for bread machine:

1 cup water
3/4 tsp salt
4 tsp canola oil
3 cups flour
1 and 1/4 tsp bread machine yeast


The basic recipe I got on a cooking tour in Italy makes for both a good dough and focaccia depending on how thin you smash it.  If I want to have fun I skip the machine because it means beating things.  Recipe makes two pizzas or a pizza and a good sized focaccia type.

1 1/2 lbs unbleached AP
1/2 lb wheat or semolina
1 package active dry or 1/4 oz compressed yeast
Pinch of sugar
3 1/2 C warm water
2 Tbsp olive oil
1/2 tsp. Salt

You can probably use the dough cycle on the machine for part 1, but I'd take it out for the next bit.
1) Start by mixing the water, yeast, & sugar, then add in about 1/2 of the flour
Stir by hand until sloppy paste consistency
Gradually add remaining flour, oil, & salt
Continue mixing by hand & knead for a bit until it's not sticking to everything.

Then the fun part...
2) Take it out and beat it on a surface.  As in dust the surface with a little flour to keep the dough from sticking, grab the ball and stretch out a little then slam it onto the surface.
Do the stretch & knead thing a couple of times.
Pick it up and slam it onto the surface again.  Really work out your aggression.  Supposedly this helps with the gluten formation.
Do this for about 15-20 min.

3) Then grease a bowl, toss it in there & roll to coat in oil, cover & rise like normal for about 2 hours-ish.
When you're ready, punch the dough down then cut it in half.
Toss them on a lightly floured surface & roll into balls, let rest for 15 min.
If you want to store it, roll in oil to keep from drying out, wrap in plastic & throw in the fridge for up to 2 days.

For pizza you want to stretch it really really thin; it rises like crazy.
Lightly flour your tray/pan with semolina or corn meal (or flour if you don't have either) - NO OIL
You can do the majority with a pin if you want but at some point you'll have to stretch by hand to get it thin enough.
Be gentle; it'll tear if you go too fast.
When you think you're there, keep going until you reduce it to half that thickness for good measure.

Top with whatever and bake at 475/500 if possible for about 10-15 min.

For non-pizza, stretch it out however you want, just make it not quite as thin.  It typically rises in the oven 3-fold. Bake same time/temp.
I often throw it into a long Pyrex dish for baking rather than on a tray.  If you do that, grease the dish.
 
5 days ago  

zeroflight222: jasonvatch: My first try:

[Fark user image 850x1133]
cheap phone camera

Looks like a good first try; I'd eat that.  Though the dough looks a little more dense/less chewy than I normally like it.  The cheese is nicely browned.


Thanks. No crust recipe, just put stuff in the bowl. Needed more fat and sugar.

The sauce came in the door as farmer's market tomatoes. I wish I had a garden.
 
5 days ago  
I'm a fan of Marc Vetri's Naples dough recipe, but it does require a little planning out a few days in advance. To be honest, though, most Naples dough recipes from reputable sources are pretty similar, since it's a simple dough with only 4 ingredients. However, a good long ferment does wonders for flavor and digestibility.
 
5 days ago  

AsparagusFTW: Just buy Chicago style over New York style.


We are talking about pizza here...not a thick casserole.
 
5 days ago  
I make pizza all the time.

They're not wrong.  The dough is the most difficult part. But holy hell, are they complicating the process.
 
5 days ago  

Cortez the Killer: Farnn: How exactly does a pizza stone get hotter than the over it's in?

It doesn't. However, a stone or steel will transfer its heat to the dough much more efficiently than if it was either just put in on the rack to air cook, or if put onto an unheated pan then placed in the oven.


I figured this was a rhetorical question alluding to the stupidity of the author who does in fact claim that the stone gets hotter
 
5 days ago  

max_pooper: "00" flour is a dumb choice for making pizza in a home oven. If you have a special pizza oven that can reach 900F and you want to make Neapolitan pizza, use "00". You will get the charred spots that style of pizza is known for. If you do it in a low temperature home oven your pizza crust will be totally pale. If you want a nice brown crust you will need to increase the sugar and oil content of your dough. You can simply add white sugar but that doesn't bring much to the table in terms of flavor and can add too much sweetness if you get the rations wrong. Malted barley has enzymes that will convert the starches into simple sugars that will brown up nicely as well add a bit more complexity to the flavor. If you are thinking malted barley is a specialty ingredient that is hard to find that you're not going to bother with, don't fret. Use King Arthur bread flour. It's unbleached wheat flour with malted barley and is readily available in just about every grocery store. For no fuss pizza dough, it's perfect.


Caputo makes a 00 with extra malt, especially for home oven pizza. Caputo 00 Americano. It is a damn joy to work with. Super absorbent, silky smooth, ferments beautifully in the fridge. I generally go with:
67% hydration
1.5% salt
0.4% instant yeast
Let it double at room temp, cut into single pizza pieces, cold ferment for 3ish days, let it bench proof for 1-2 hours (basically let it warm up), stretch, etc.

One day, I will have a pizza oven. One day.
 
5 days ago  

freakdiablo: AsparagusFTW: Just buy Chicago style over New York style.

If I wanted casserole, I'd make a casserole.


cocozilla: AsparagusFTW: Just buy Chicago style over New York style.

We are talking about pizza here...not a thick casserole.


F the two of youse!
 
5 days ago  

Farnn: How exactly does a pizza stone get hotter than the over it's in?


I remember reading in a cookbook that a marble slab will always be colder than the room it's sitting in, so I gotta conclude it's Maxwell's Daemon trolling us
 
5 days ago  
in other pizza news here's the mayor of New York throwing shade on New Haven

pbs.twimg.comView Full Size
 
5 days ago  

ChubbyTiger: max_pooper: "00" flour is a dumb choice for making pizza in a home oven. If you have a special pizza oven that can reach 900F and you want to make Neapolitan pizza, use "00". You will get the charred spots that style of pizza is known for. If you do it in a low temperature home oven your pizza crust will be totally pale. If you want a nice brown crust you will need to increase the sugar and oil content of your dough. You can simply add white sugar but that doesn't bring much to the table in terms of flavor and can add too much sweetness if you get the rations wrong. Malted barley has enzymes that will convert the starches into simple sugars that will brown up nicely as well add a bit more complexity to the flavor. If you are thinking malted barley is a specialty ingredient that is hard to find that you're not going to bother with, don't fret. Use King Arthur bread flour. It's unbleached wheat flour with malted barley and is readily available in just about every grocery store. For no fuss pizza dough, it's perfect.

Caputo makes a 00 with extra malt, especially for home oven pizza. Caputo 00 Americano. It is a damn joy to work with. Super absorbent, silky smooth, ferments beautifully in the fridge. I generally go with:
67% hydration
1.5% salt
0.4% instant yeast
Let it double at room temp, cut into single pizza pieces, cold ferment for 3ish days, let it bench proof for 1-2 hours (basically let it warm up), stretch, etc.

One day, I will have a pizza oven. One day.


In a previous thread, I mentioned that I just got a woodfired, backyard pizza oven. One of the portable ones that makes 12 in pizzas. It's awesome. I've only used it twice so far (third time planned for Saturday), but it's just amazing. I'm still getting used to the high heat and how quickly it cooks the pizzas.

This time, I'm trying 00 flour for the first time. Dough is fermenting in fridge as I type this. But really, what I need most right now to improve my pizzas is a wooden peel for launching and an IR thermometer to better gauge the temp of the stone. And maybe one of those circular turning peels, but so far, a long handled spatula has been working okay for that.
 
5 days ago  

phaseolus: Farnn: How exactly does a pizza stone get hotter than the over it's in?

I remember reading in a cookbook that a marble slab will always be colder than the room it's sitting in, so I gotta conclude it's Maxwell's Daemon trolling us


I believe that the marble feeling colder thing is similar or the same as the baking stone thing. The marble isn't actually colder than the room. It just conducts heat differently so that experientially, it feels colder.
 
5 days ago  

mikey15: Laobaojun: mikey15: Should I use rings or chunks of pineapple?

Pineapple AND anchovies!

rings or chunks of anchovy


Rings if you can get them.
 
5 days ago  

phlegmjay: phaseolus: Farnn: How exactly does a pizza stone get hotter than the over it's in?

I remember reading in a cookbook that a marble slab will always be colder than the room it's sitting in, so I gotta conclude it's Maxwell's Daemon trolling us

I believe that the marble feeling colder thing is similar or the same as the baking stone thing. The marble isn't actually colder than the room. It just conducts heat differently so that experientially, it feels colder.


When the Ms. and I were doing science outreach in schools, we had a program on heat.  One of our first exercises was to have the students feel a metal part of their chair or desk, and then a wooden part.  They always report that the metal is colder.  Then we would point out that they were both the same temperature.  It's all about heat transfer.
 
5 days ago  

phaseolus: Farnn: How exactly does a pizza stone get hotter than the over it's in?

I remember reading in a cookbook that a marble slab will always be colder than the room it's sitting in, so I gotta conclude it's Maxwell's Daemon trolling us


So does the internal temperature of a roast continue to rise when you take it out of the oven to rest? If so, why?
 
5 days ago  

phaseolus: Farnn: How exactly does a pizza stone get hotter than the over it's in?

I remember reading in a cookbook that a marble slab will always be colder than the room it's sitting in, so I gotta conclude it's Maxwell's Daemon trolling us


CSB:  we were at a fudge shop in the UP just before closing time.  One of the employees was covering the massive marble candy slab tabletops with electric blankets.  We asked about that and she explained that they need to keep the slabs from cooling off overnight when it's cooler in the shop.
 
5 days ago  

phlegmjay: ChubbyTiger: max_pooper: "00" flour is a dumb choice for making pizza in a home oven. If you have a special pizza oven that can reach 900F and you want to make Neapolitan pizza, use "00". You will get the charred spots that style of pizza is known for. If you do it in a low temperature home oven your pizza crust will be totally pale. If you want a nice brown crust you will need to increase the sugar and oil content of your dough. You can simply add white sugar but that doesn't bring much to the table in terms of flavor and can add too much sweetness if you get the rations wrong. Malted barley has enzymes that will convert the starches into simple sugars that will brown up nicely as well add a bit more complexity to the flavor. If you are thinking malted barley is a specialty ingredient that is hard to find that you're not going to bother with, don't fret. Use King Arthur bread flour. It's unbleached wheat flour with malted barley and is readily available in just about every grocery store. For no fuss pizza dough, it's perfect.

Caputo makes a 00 with extra malt, especially for home oven pizza. Caputo 00 Americano. It is a damn joy to work with. Super absorbent, silky smooth, ferments beautifully in the fridge. I generally go with:
67% hydration
1.5% salt
0.4% instant yeast
Let it double at room temp, cut into single pizza pieces, cold ferment for 3ish days, let it bench proof for 1-2 hours (basically let it warm up), stretch, etc.

One day, I will have a pizza oven. One day.

In a previous thread, I mentioned that I just got a woodfired, backyard pizza oven. One of the portable ones that makes 12 in pizzas. It's awesome. I've only used it twice so far (third time planned for Saturday), but it's just amazing. I'm still getting used to the high heat and how quickly it cooks the pizzas.

This time, I'm trying 00 flour for the first time. Dough is fermenting in fridge as I type this. But really, what I need most right now to improve my pizzas is a wooden peel for launch ...


Ooni?  You're going to love stretching the dough out with 00 after a long ferment.  I don't even toss it anymore.  00 and high hydration and it stretches so easily and doesn't rip easily at all.  If you haven't, take a look at Brick Oven Baker (www.brickovenbaker.com).  You can buy Italian flour in amounts from 1 kg to 25 lbs. Not affiliated, but great products and really nice to deal with.
 
4 days ago  

ChubbyTiger: phlegmjay: ChubbyTiger: max_pooper: "00" flour is a dumb choice for making pizza in a home oven. If you have a special pizza oven that can reach 900F and you want to make Neapolitan pizza, use "00". You will get the charred spots that style of pizza is known for. If you do it in a low temperature home oven your pizza crust will be totally pale. If you want a nice brown crust you will need to increase the sugar and oil content of your dough. You can simply add white sugar but that doesn't bring much to the table in terms of flavor and can add too much sweetness if you get the rations wrong. Malted barley has enzymes that will convert the starches into simple sugars that will brown up nicely as well add a bit more complexity to the flavor. If you are thinking malted barley is a specialty ingredient that is hard to find that you're not going to bother with, don't fret. Use King Arthur bread flour. It's unbleached wheat flour with malted barley and is readily available in just about every grocery store. For no fuss pizza dough, it's perfect.

Caputo makes a 00 with extra malt, especially for home oven pizza. Caputo 00 Americano. It is a damn joy to work with. Super absorbent, silky smooth, ferments beautifully in the fridge. I generally go with:
67% hydration
1.5% salt
0.4% instant yeast
Let it double at room temp, cut into single pizza pieces, cold ferment for 3ish days, let it bench proof for 1-2 hours (basically let it warm up), stretch, etc.

One day, I will have a pizza oven. One day.

In a previous thread, I mentioned that I just got a woodfired, backyard pizza oven. One of the portable ones that makes 12 in pizzas. It's awesome. I've only used it twice so far (third time planned for Saturday), but it's just amazing. I'm still getting used to the high heat and how quickly it cooks the pizzas.

This time, I'm trying 00 flour for the first time. Dough is fermenting in fridge as I type this. But really, what I need most right now to improve my pizzas is a wooden peel for launch ...

Ooni?  You're going to love stretching the dough out with 00 after a long ferment.  I don't even toss it anymore.  00 and high hydration and it stretches so easily and doesn't rip easily at all.  If you haven't, take a look at Brick Oven Baker (www.brickovenbaker.com).  You can buy Italian flour in amounts from 1 kg to 25 lbs. Not affiliated, but great products and really nice to deal with.


Yeah. An Ooni. Thanks for the rec. I'll check that site out.

I'm looking forward to trying the 00 flour. Stretching the dough was a (small) problem with the dough I made from bread flour. It turned out well, but had a tendency to contract when I put it on the peel. I figured I would have to let the dough relax next time, but hopefully the 00 flour will take care of that.
 
4 days ago  
Yeah, I'm just going to keep using the Jiffy pizza crust mix. It's less than a dollar, easy to work with, and I can just put it on a sheet pan for a nice thin crust with whatever I feel like topping it with. I can't even find 00 flower without shipping it and I really don't think I'd appreciate the difference enough to make the cost worth it.
 
4 days ago  
That said, find me some buffalo mozzarella and some decent tomatoes, then I'm more apt to pay a premium for ingredients.
 
4 days ago  

fasahd: phaseolus: Farnn: How exactly does a pizza stone get hotter than the over it's in?

I remember reading in a cookbook that a marble slab will always be colder than the room it's sitting in, so I gotta conclude it's Maxwell's Daemon trolling us

So does the internal temperature of a roast continue to rise when you take it out of the oven to rest? If so, why?


Yes , the internal temperature will continue to rise. It's all about thermal equilibrium. Heat always move as from hot to cold. When you put a 40deg hunk of meat in a a 325deg oven, the heat will move from the hot air to the cold meat. The heat will slowly move into the center of the meat so when the middle hits 125 the edges are over 200. When you take the meat out of the oven the heat from the outside part of the meat will move to the colder air but also the cooler inner part of the meat. As long as your cooking temperature is higher than your target temperature you will get internal temperature variation that will lead to carry over. The temperature differences, the size and shape of the meat will determine how much carry over you get. You'll get no carry over with sous vide.
 
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