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(My Panhandle)   Pilot arrested for buzzing over, nosediving toward crowd at Gulf Coast Jam Saturday, all to advertise his flight school. Lucky cops didn't shoot him down   (mypanhandle.com) divider line
    More: Florida, Police, Robert Ryan Gore, Gulf Coast Jam, Bay County Sheriff's Office, Panama City, Florida, Singer Cole Swindell, dangerous situation, Tyndall Air Force Base  
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1994 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Jun 2021 at 12:41 AM (4 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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4 days ago  
"The report also revealed that a sniper with the Bay County Sheriff's Office was watching the plane and that deputies warned the pilot that they were prepared to "take action" if the incident continued."

Yes, because shooting at an aircraft doing low passes over a crowd is sure to improve matters.

All that aside, he is a bad instructor if he doesn't think there is anything wrong with flying less than 500ft above a crowd. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/​1​4/91.119 "Over ... any open air assembly of persons, an altitude of 1,000 feet above the highest obstacle within a horizontal radius of 2,000 feet of the aircraft. "

The beer 'koozie' drops are probably legal from the FAA perspective though. Local littering ordinances... maybe not so much.
 
4 days ago  
Was he out of Turkeys?
 
4 days ago  
Must have been a white plane.
 
4 days ago  

Bajtaur: The beer 'koozie' drops are probably legal from the FAA perspective though. Local littering ordinances... maybe not so much.


The only rule that I know that pertains to dropping of objects

91.15 Dropping objects. No pilot in command of a civil aircraft may allow any object to be dropped from that aircraft in flight that creates a hazard to persons or property. However, this section does not prohibit the dropping of any object if reasonable precautions are taken to avoid injury or damage to persons or property.
 
4 days ago  

Yaw String: Bajtaur: The beer 'koozie' drops are probably legal from the FAA perspective though. Local littering ordinances... maybe not so much.

The only rule that I know that pertains to dropping of objects

91.15 Dropping objects. No pilot in command of a civil aircraft may allow any object to be dropped from that aircraft in flight that creates a hazard to persons or property. However, this section does not prohibit the dropping of any object if reasonable precautions are taken to avoid injury or damage to persons or property.


Yep, that is the only one I know of as well. I figure soft foam koozies are unlikely to be able to injure anyone.

Just on repeatedly violating safe altitudes over a large crowd while being a CFI, I predict a 709 ride is in that pilot's near future.
 
4 days ago  
CSB:
Back in my college days, the university I went to had "The Marshmallow Bomber". During home football games, some dork would drop pink marshmallows from a small plane onto football fans in the stands. As far as I know, they never did catch the guy or gal.
 
4 days ago  
Damn, the Blue Angels must be pretty hard up these days!

/srsly, the blue angels practices in pensacola are fantastic
//great beaches too
 
4 days ago  
"I'm Roy Halladay, and I approve this message."
 
4 days ago  
I foresee the cops trolling for surplus F-16s...
 
4 days ago  
Marketing genius

The Simpsons - Homer markets bowling (S6Ep13)
Youtube 6lKuugZCD6A
 
4 days ago  

Yaw String: Bajtaur: The beer 'koozie' drops are probably legal from the FAA perspective though. Local littering ordinances... maybe not so much.

The only rule that I know that pertains to dropping of objects

91.15 Dropping objects. No pilot in command of a civil aircraft may allow any object to be dropped from that aircraft in flight that creates a hazard to persons or property. However, this section does not prohibit the dropping of any object if reasonable precautions are taken to avoid injury or damage to persons or property.


Some flying clubs have competitions where you drop flour bombs out of your plane and try to hit targets on the ground.
 
4 days ago  
And then he got more advertising minutes on local news than he would have had to buy

Koozies dropped out a plane flown by what appears to be a drunk asshole? Sign me up!
 
4 days ago  
OMG!!!

SUPERSPREADER!!

SOMEONE BURN THAT PLACE!!
 
4 days ago  
A sniper.. was ready... to take action?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
4 days ago  

Bajtaur: "The report also revealed that a sniper with the Bay County Sheriff's Office was watching the plane and that deputies warned the pilot that they were prepared to "take action" if the incident continued."

Yes, because shooting at an aircraft doing low passes over a crowd is sure to improve matters.

All that aside, he is a bad instructor if he doesn't think there is anything wrong with flying less than 500ft above a crowd. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/1​4/91.119 "Over ... any open air assembly of persons, an altitude of 1,000 feet above the highest obstacle within a horizontal radius of 2,000 feet of the aircraft. "

The beer 'koozie' drops are probably legal from the FAA perspective though. Local littering ordinances... maybe not so much.


depending on the crowd size the event could have been deemed significant enough to warrant restricting airspace or altitude. Homeland security does that a lot for major planned events.
 
4 days ago  

edmo: I foresee the cops trolling for surplus F-16s...


Dragnet Jet Scene
Youtube 1x70o5lTd1U
 
4 days ago  
That's a weird name for a flight school
 
4 days ago  
Oh it was a bro country!

Cole Swindell - Chillin' It (Official Video)
Youtube Mh-eN--JK8Q
 
4 days ago  
Late Night 'Bill Clinton via Satellite 6/23/04
Youtube ETuQNdRXOqw
 
4 days ago  
Onlookers heard calling out "Jump, Doc! Jump!"

Catch 22 Airplane Splatter
Youtube esIihVb-Jus
 
4 days ago  
Haha! It is all fun and games, right?

I remember an airshow at El Toro I was at where a guy crashed a MiG. Thrilling stunts go wrong all the time and kill people. Maybe pilots should be a little more cautious.

Heard a story yesterday for the first time of Australia's number one ace in WWII. He was killed during the war, apparently, when he was stunting around and misjudging how far he was up off the deck. He tried to fly UNDER a seaplane as they were approaching land.

My takeaway is that even the best pilots can get themselves into positions for which they are ill equipped or ill  prepared. How much room does that leave for people who are not "the best pilots"? How likely is an average or bad pilot to evaluate their own performance as excellent?
 
4 days ago  
Sheriff: This is the Bay County Sheriff's Office, cease flying or we will take action

Pilot: Didn't meant to bother anybody - do you a little recon for coming over to join the event

Sheriff: (?)
 
4 days ago  
theaviationgeekclub.comView Full Size
 
4 days ago  

Aardvark Inc.: Onlookers heard calling out "Jump, Doc! Jump!"

[YouTube video: Catch 22 Airplane Splatter]


Shakes tiny.... ouch motherfarker!
 
4 days ago  

2fardownthread: Haha! It is all fun and games, right?

I remember an airshow at El Toro I was at where a guy crashed a MiG. Thrilling stunts go wrong all the time and kill people. Maybe pilots should be a little more cautious.

Heard a story yesterday for the first time of Australia's number one ace in WWII. He was killed during the war, apparently, when he was stunting around and misjudging how far he was up off the deck. He tried to fly UNDER a seaplane as they were approaching land.

My takeaway is that even the best pilots can get themselves into positions for which they are ill equipped or ill  prepared. How much room does that leave for people who are not "the best pilots"? How likely is an average or bad pilot to evaluate their own performance as excellent?


Australia's army got beaten by a mob of Emu. Maybe they aren't the best measuring stick...
 
4 days ago  
Flying instructor. This guy's day has probably just ended his career and business.

Also, this part:

'During a follow-up on Sunday, deputies called Gore and he refused to meet with them. Instead, he said he "cleared what he did with his attorney and stated he was legal to do what he did in regards with the throwing of the" koozies.'

He refused to meet with the deputies.

Something tells me that this is probably how he ended up getting charged for his stunt.
 
4 days ago  

punkwrestler: 2fardownthread: Haha! It is all fun and games, right?

I remember an airshow at El Toro I was at where a guy crashed a MiG. Thrilling stunts go wrong all the time and kill people. Maybe pilots should be a little more cautious.

Heard a story yesterday for the first time of Australia's number one ace in WWII. He was killed during the war, apparently, when he was stunting around and misjudging how far he was up off the deck. He tried to fly UNDER a seaplane as they were approaching land.

My takeaway is that even the best pilots can get themselves into positions for which they are ill equipped or ill  prepared. How much room does that leave for people who are not "the best pilots"? How likely is an average or bad pilot to evaluate their own performance as excellent?

Australia's army got beaten by a mob of Emu. Maybe they aren't the best measuring stick...


All I will say is that he was apparently the BEST, and as far as measuring sticks go, he was their best ACE. So, you know... I'm not going to belittle the guy. It is sad when things end badly.

And you know, if  you misjudge and the emu get the best of you, they aren't going to kill you, in most cases. Piloting a plane has high speeds and great heights, so you have to use a little caution.
 
4 days ago  

Russ1642: Yaw String: Bajtaur: The beer 'koozie' drops are probably legal from the FAA perspective though. Local littering ordinances... maybe not so much.

The only rule that I know that pertains to dropping of objects

91.15 Dropping objects. No pilot in command of a civil aircraft may allow any object to be dropped from that aircraft in flight that creates a hazard to persons or property. However, this section does not prohibit the dropping of any object if reasonable precautions are taken to avoid injury or damage to persons or property.

Some flying clubs have competitions where you drop flour bombs out of your plane and try to hit targets on the ground.


Quite a few municipalities in the US have airplane "pumpkin drop" events in October.
 
4 days ago  
Great, the cops have SAMs now? They must have seen them in the mail order catalog and thought that it stood for Sheriff-to-African Missiles.
 
4 days ago  
One of my coolest concert memories was from Cal Jam 2. Unannounced Frank Marino and Mahogany Rush closed the show and came on at sunset. During their set, the stunt pilot from the movie The Great Waldo Pepper buzzed the crowd (400,000+) in his bi-plane.

You can't see or hear the plane in the video below, but if you're familiar with Frank Marino, you get the idea of how cool it was. Marino shredding on guitar with a plane buzzing your head.

MAHOGANY RUSH PURPLE HAZE LIVE CAL JAM II YouTube
Youtube j7zxD2e67hs
 
4 days ago  
Reminds me of this, for some reason.
The Lord of the Rings - Firework scene [1080p HD]
Youtube uacUXA57VYE
 
4 days ago  
CSB
One of the kids at my school had a pilot dad that would do low level passes over the playground at break time.  It was pretty cool when I was seven but looking back, having a Vulcan bomber armed with two nuclear missiles regularly pass over a school at less than 500ft is a tad risky.
Fark user imageView Full Size

My uncle used to service those missiles and would bring home the ball bearings they packed them in for me and my cousins to use as marbles. No risk there either!
 
4 days ago  

Aardvark Inc.: Onlookers heard calling out "Jump, Doc! Jump!"

[YouTube video: Catch 22 Airplane Splatter]


Interestingly, in the HBO miniseries the pilot took out one of the gunners on the bombers, in this scene. Made it much more dramatic.
 
Al!
4 days ago  
Put me on the list of people that are baffled that someone thought a sniper was a good idea. I'm not going to pretend that a small arms shot at a very precise critical location can't disable an aircraft, because as a former USAF aircraft mechanic, and a history buff, I can assure you that it can. The problem arises when you hit that 1 in a Million shot. Now you have an uncontrolled aircraft filled with fuel over a giant crowd. At this point, I'm just assuming they had a platoon ready with flamethrowers just in case they decided to disperse the crowd that way instead of using an airplane crash.

Oh, crap. I missed the tag. Yeah, Sherriff, shooting down a plane over a large crowd is a bad idea. There's this thing that the learn-ed folks call "gravity" and basically what it means is if the person in control of the plane can't control the plane, the plane will crash into the ground eventually. There's a lot of math that can help explain why, but I'm not going to pretend you'll understand the system, because there will be numbers higher than "baker's dozen."
 
4 days ago  
I'm a little confused on the charges here. If he didn't meet with them at all, how did they know he was drunk at the time?

If the actual charge is the reckless/careless part; why is it looped in with a DUI? Shouldn't they be two completely separate charges?
 
4 days ago  
Since when do sheriffs have jurisdiction over matters of aviation in the US?
 
4 days ago  

Russ1642: Yaw String: Bajtaur: The beer 'koozie' drops are probably legal from the FAA perspective though. Local littering ordinances... maybe not so much.

The only rule that I know that pertains to dropping of objects

91.15 Dropping objects. No pilot in command of a civil aircraft may allow any object to be dropped from that aircraft in flight that creates a hazard to persons or property. However, this section does not prohibit the dropping of any object if reasonable precautions are taken to avoid injury or damage to persons or property.

Some flying clubs have competitions where you drop flour bombs out of your plane and try to hit targets on the ground.


Been there, done that, won the trophy.  Dropping stuff is fun. Friends and I have dropped little tissue packages of candy in front of houses out in the country for birthdays.  Technically the 500 feet is for aircraft. Ultralights, hang gliders and paragliders have a different rule "hazard to persons or property" as they are not legally aircraft for the purposes of federal law.

OK so some of us are flying aircraft with N-numbers that "look" like ultralights but from 500 feet the candy will be out in the corn field.
 
4 days ago  

ChiliBoots: Since when do sheriffs have jurisdiction over matters of aviation in the US?


The sheriff writes the report and then you get the phone call from the FAA.  Been there, seen that.  Feds control the air but state and local control the surface or anything that threatens people or property on the surface.
 
4 days ago  

blodyholy: I'm a little confused on the charges here. If he didn't meet with them at all, how did they know he was drunk at the time?

If the actual charge is the reckless/careless part; why is it looped in with a DUI? Shouldn't they be two completely separate charges?


"operation of an aircraft while intoxicated or in a careless, reckless manner."

Local laws can be written in any way they want and it's up to you as the accused to hire a lawyer and convince the local judge to throw it out.
 
4 days ago  

Nocrash: blodyholy: I'm a little confused on the charges here. If he didn't meet with them at all, how did they know he was drunk at the time?

If the actual charge is the reckless/careless part; why is it looped in with a DUI? Shouldn't they be two completely separate charges?

"operation of an aircraft while intoxicated or in a careless, reckless manner."

Local laws can be written in any way they want and it's up to you as the accused to hire a lawyer and convince the local judge to throw it out.


Hmm, ok, yah I guess I get it. I just found it odd that the two were written into law in that manner.
 
4 days ago  

blodyholy: Nocrash: blodyholy: I'm a little confused on the charges here. If he didn't meet with them at all, how did they know he was drunk at the time?

If the actual charge is the reckless/careless part; why is it looped in with a DUI? Shouldn't they be two completely separate charges?

"operation of an aircraft while intoxicated or in a careless, reckless manner."

Local laws can be written in any way they want and it's up to you as the accused to hire a lawyer and convince the local judge to throw it out.

Hmm, ok, yah I guess I get it. I just found it odd that the two were written into law in that manner.


I too find it odd that such wording was already on the local books.  Perhaps it was cited under some nuisance statute.  Pilots have a long tradition of skirting regs BUT if you scare the people on the ground you have crossed a line.

P.S. Some many young instructors think they are above the rules.
 
4 days ago  

Nocrash: blodyholy: Nocrash: blodyholy: I'm a little confused on the charges here. If he didn't meet with them at all, how did they know he was drunk at the time?

If the actual charge is the reckless/careless part; why is it looped in with a DUI? Shouldn't they be two completely separate charges?

"operation of an aircraft while intoxicated or in a careless, reckless manner."

Local laws can be written in any way they want and it's up to you as the accused to hire a lawyer and convince the local judge to throw it out.

Hmm, ok, yah I guess I get it. I just found it odd that the two were written into law in that manner.

I too find it odd that such wording was already on the local books.  Perhaps it was cited under some nuisance statute.  Pilots have a long tradition of skirting regs BUT if you scare the people on the ground you have crossed a line.

P.S. Some many young instructors think they are above the rules.


This isn't 'Nam, Dude. There are rules.
 
4 days ago  
Police have anti-aircraft capability now?
 
4 days ago  
For next time.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
4 days ago  
There isn't really accurate altitude measurement except for at the airport.  The pilot is looking at what's basically a barometer with a height scale painted on it, referenced to what a recent weather report said at some airport miles away.  People on the ground looking up are just estimating - it's either "scary" or "not scary" based on gut reaction.

So it's pretty difficult to say if he really busted 500 AGL.

(If an airport's radar could see him, probably those are calibrated well enough to get accurate altitude?  And then there's touching down.  That's the most reliable way to know your AGL.)
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
4 days ago  

noitsnot: There isn't really accurate altitude measurement except for at the airport.  The pilot is looking at what's basically a barometer with a height scale painted on it, referenced to what a recent weather report said at some airport miles away.  People on the ground looking up are just estimating - it's either "scary" or "not scary" based on gut reaction.

So it's pretty difficult to say if he really busted 500 AGL.

(If an airport's radar could see him, probably those are calibrated well enough to get accurate altitude?  And then there's touching down.  That's the most reliable way to know your AGL.)


Airport radar does not measure altitude directly.  If you are near an airport your airplane is legally required to be equipped with a transponder that reports altitude to the airport.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
4 days ago  

noitsnot: There isn't really accurate altitude measurement except for at the airport.  The pilot is looking at what's basically a barometer with a height scale painted on it, referenced to what a recent weather report said at some airport miles away.  People on the ground looking up are just estimating - it's either "scary" or "not scary" based on gut reaction.

So it's pretty difficult to say if he really busted 500 AGL.

(If an airport's radar could see him, probably those are calibrated well enough to get accurate altitude?  And then there's touching down.  That's the most reliable way to know your AGL.)


Airplanes are often equipped with a radar altimeter that gives an accurate height about ground when you are banked near level and under 2,000 feet or so.  As far as I know this reading does not go into the transponder, which relies on barometric altitude.  I have sat in the passenger seat watching the radar altimeter on an approach that goes over a ridge before dropping into a valley for the turn onto final.  We got pretty low, but it was a VFR flight.
 
4 days ago  

noitsnot: There isn't really accurate altitude measurement except for at the airport.  The pilot is looking at what's basically a barometer with a height scale painted on it, referenced to what a recent weather report said at some airport miles away.  People on the ground looking up are just estimating - it's either "scary" or "not scary" based on gut reaction.

So it's pretty difficult to say if he really busted 500 AGL.

(If an airport's radar could see him, probably those are calibrated well enough to get accurate altitude?  And then there's touching down.  That's the most reliable way to know your AGL.)


Actually the rule that applies from FAR 91.119

(b) Over congested areas. Over any congested area of a city, town, or settlement, or over any open air assembly of persons, an altitude of 1,000 feet above the highest obstacle within a horizontal radius of 2,000 feet of the aircraft.
 
4 days ago  

Nocrash: Russ1642: Yaw String: Bajtaur: The beer 'koozie' drops are probably legal from the FAA perspective though. Local littering ordinances... maybe not so much.

The only rule that I know that pertains to dropping of objects

91.15 Dropping objects. No pilot in command of a civil aircraft may allow any object to be dropped from that aircraft in flight that creates a hazard to persons or property. However, this section does not prohibit the dropping of any object if reasonable precautions are taken to avoid injury or damage to persons or property.

Some flying clubs have competitions where you drop flour bombs out of your plane and try to hit targets on the ground.

Been there, done that, won the trophy.  Dropping stuff is fun. Friends and I have dropped little tissue packages of candy in front of houses out in the country for birthdays.  Technically the 500 feet is for aircraft. Ultralights, hang gliders and paragliders have a different rule "hazard to persons or property" as they are not legally aircraft for the purposes of federal law.

OK so some of us are flying aircraft with N-numbers that "look" like ultralights but from 500 feet the candy will be out in the corn field.


Not legally aircraft, for the same reasons a pool floaty is not legally a boat.
 
4 days ago  

noitsnot: There isn't really accurate altitude measurement except for at the airport.  The pilot is looking at what's basically a barometer with a height scale painted on it, referenced to what a recent weather report said at some airport miles away.  People on the ground looking up are just estimating - it's either "scary" or "not scary" based on gut reaction.

So it's pretty difficult to say if he really busted 500 AGL.

(If an airport's radar could see him, probably those are calibrated well enough to get accurate altitude?  And then there's touching down.  That's the most reliable way to know your AGL.)


There's a cool new technology called "GPS". All the kids are using it these days.
 
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