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(Delish.com)   So I just fried a kilo of chicken wings in a ton of olive oil in a deep skillet on high heat. It took an hour to cook them (flipped halfway through). Should I use a different oil to speed up the time? Also, what oils are good for what? Curious   (delish.com) divider line
    More: Survey, Buffalo wings, Cooking, Chicken, Anchor Bar, National Buffalo Wing Festival, Buffalo, New York, perfect crispness, wire rack  
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401 clicks; posted to Food » on 09 Jun 2021 at 8:35 AM (7 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



54 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-06-09 8:27:33 AM  
You can call me "tallow".
I can be your long lost lard.
 
2021-06-09 8:27:37 AM  
Get an air fryer.
 
2021-06-09 8:32:36 AM  

snocone: You can call me "tallow".
I can be your long lost lard.


Ahh, nice -- I loved the entire Greaseland album.

I just use veggie/canola for general pan frying (okra, chicken). You can up your game with bacon drippings, or combine them with veggie.

Olive oil is my "EDC" but I never use it for more than basic sautee.

But if I had an hour to kill for some wings, I'm tossing them in the electric smoker or just the oven.
 
2021-06-09 8:35:20 AM  
Is this headline supposed to be the equivalent of asking for advice on the best way to bbq a hot dog? Because that's really what it seems like.
 
2021-06-09 8:44:40 AM  

Pocket Ninja: Is this headline supposed to be the equivalent of asking for advice on the best way to bbq a hot dog? Because that's really what it seems like.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-09 8:48:38 AM  
Olive oil? Must be nice having more money than common sense.
 
2021-06-09 8:48:49 AM  
Wait, did they fry the wings for an hour? That's not going to be edible.

/we don't RTFA 'round here
 
2021-06-09 8:52:10 AM  
Olive oil is not a suitable frying oil.

Suitable frying oils: Peanut, vegetable, canola, safflower oil

And LOL what? Fry in small batches.
 
2021-06-09 8:54:36 AM  
Linked recipe unrelated. If you could find an article about baked wings surely you can find an article about oils, smoke points and another article about not overcrowding your pan or pot.
 
2021-06-09 8:57:42 AM  
You don't really fry stuff hot with olive oil, it's smoke point is pretty low. You do things like lightly brown a mirepoix with it. Use it to make salad dressings, or anything where the oil doesn't have to get super hot.

Canola, peanut or sunflower - or blends - are what you use for high temp frying, fries, chicken, filling your deep fryer, etc.
 
2021-06-09 8:58:51 AM  
Canola oil is my favorite since I quit using lard.
 
2021-06-09 9:03:45 AM  
We'd use peanut oil in the deep fryer at this place I worked at in college.  It's got a high smoke point and shakes off the wings and fries nicely.

I'd say for that bake recipe linked, peanut would be good, too.
 
2021-06-09 9:05:28 AM  
I would use the extract of the nut of the pea.
 
2021-06-09 9:06:01 AM  
Olive oil is generally considered bad for frying because its smoke point is way too low. Plus, it can get bitter. Next time, try peanut oil or canola oil.
 
2021-06-09 9:07:47 AM  
Honey in Buffalo wing sauce?
<scowls in Central/Western NY>
 
2021-06-09 9:12:46 AM  
Olive oil is for sauteing, not frying. You need an oil with a higher smoke point for frying, such as canola.
 
2021-06-09 9:17:07 AM  
Olive oil is suitable for confit.

Did you make your wings confit?
 
2021-06-09 9:19:18 AM  
I just want to say that if there were a Nobel Prize for evil genius marketing, it would have been retired with the guy who convinced a nation that farking chicken wings were edible.
 
Ant
2021-06-09 9:20:52 AM  
Olive oil has a low smoke point. Use canola or peanut oil.
 
Ant
2021-06-09 9:23:05 AM  

Sliding Carp: I just want to say that if there were a Nobel Prize for evil genius marketing, it would have been retired with the guy who convinced a nation that farking chicken wings were edible.


When I make roast chicken, that's the part I eat first, before anyone else even sees the chicken. They're pretty damn good if you ask me.
 
2021-06-09 9:23:27 AM  
You didn't fry your wings, you braised them.  If you're doing that throw the fark down and get some duck fat.  Like everyone else said you crowded the pot and used the wrong oil.

Personally, I prefer a smoked wing. It's nice to throw them on when you're smoking something large like a brisket or pork but and either make yourself some lunch or an appetizer.
 
2021-06-09 9:43:27 AM  
What deep frying with olive oil may look like:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
Ant
2021-06-09 9:50:41 AM  

NikolaiFarkoff: But if I had an hour to kill for some wings, I'm tossing them in the electric smoker or just the oven.


Smoke to cook, then fry to crisp the skin.
 
2021-06-09 9:58:02 AM  
If you have to fry it & slather it in barbecue sauce to make it edible does it really qualify as food?
 
2021-06-09 9:58:28 AM  
What people are saying above with the higher smoke point is good advice. I also advise frying in something with more saturated fats. Once they fried good cools, the saturated fats will be less liquid and it will feel less greasy.
 
2021-06-09 10:02:18 AM  
The article is ok but misses a bit.  And frying in olive oil?  What the ever loving fark?

I baked my wings for years but I mostly do fried now.  I flour the wings - flour + salt + pepper....roll them around a bit.  The wings should be deep fried.  If you have an outdoor fryer, just fry them on 325-350-ish until the float then give them a few minutes then check one for "doneness".

The sauce is 1 part your favorite wing hot sauce (I like Louisiana red-dot) and 1 part butter...like *real* butter.  You can add whatever you like after that - I like a little garlic.  But you sure as fark don't reduce like the article says.  You want to heat until everything melts but the butter fat doesn't separate.  You should see a little steam come off the sauce.

Also, use a good restaurant-supply stainless bowl.  Like a big one (I have 20-30qt bowls).  Put wings in, dump some sauce on, stir them until coated, then dump in serving dish hot.

This isn't difficult at all.  I do this at gatherings as a side dish/snack food while I'm cooking other things....like 10-15lbs of wings.
 
2021-06-09 10:06:13 AM  
A kilo of wings needs a tonne of oil, not a ton.
 
jbc [TotalFark]
2021-06-09 10:10:51 AM  
Quaker State would be good for your car, Subby.
 
2021-06-09 10:13:13 AM  
"What even is buffalo sauce? In most cases, it's a simple mixture of melted butter and hot sauce. For us? We like to add a touch of honey, too. To make your own, bring honey and hot sauce to a simmer in a small saucepan, then whisk in butter...." ~ FTA

Stopped reading there, first paragraph of the "recipe".  You might as well fry the wings in motor oil at that point.

Vegetable/Canola/peanut are all fine choices, but please, either find another recipe for Buffalo sauce or just stick to one of the store bought brands.  As somebody else mentioned, wings are actually one of the things that an air fryer is almost as good as a deep fryer for and way easier to clean.
 
2021-06-09 10:17:34 AM  

Weidbrewer: Honey in Buffalo wing sauce?
<scowls in Central/Western NY>


What if you had an opinion and nobody cared?
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-09 10:23:28 AM  
If it took an hour to cool them all (I assume you threw them all in at the same time) then the oil temp was so low that your wings probably ended up being a greasy rubbery mess when they finally looked like they were cooked.

Wing confit is NOT what you want.
 
2021-06-09 11:29:26 AM  
I'm sorry but I want to know what went through subbys mind that olive oil seemed like a good idea.

I'm also on the tallow/ canola oil train.

/used to have vegetarians come in to bdubs and order burgers and fries.

//when I asked them if they knew what we fried the fries in I was told "please don't ruin this for us"
 
2021-06-09 11:42:38 AM  

Axeofjudgement: /used to have vegetarians come in to bdubs and order burgers and fries.

//when I asked them if they knew what we fried the fries in I was told "please don't ruin this for us"


Wait, they would order burgers -- but somehow knowing the frying base for the chips would spoil it for them?

And what's bdubs? Some new America chain?
 
2021-06-09 11:51:10 AM  
Next time, use lard or peanut oil or really any relatively inexpensive vegetable oil, replace the wings with actual good chicken parts, apply a light coating/breading and use a cast iron skillet. Takes about, eh, 10 min. per side.

OR just roast them in the oven.

Chicken wings are overrated.
 
2021-06-09 11:59:49 AM  
Cut up your wings, brine them in salt and sugar, then dry them and oil them lightly.

Roast them in parchment lined baking trays at 450 F for 25 minutes, draining and reserving liquid at the 10 minute mark.

The wings are done.

To finish them, take the liquid portion of the reserved liquid (not the fat) and stir in some potato starch.  In a wok, add sesame oil, minced garlic and ginger; when softened, throw in the wings; then the reserved liquid and tater starch, with either hot sauce or some Pianxian chili bean curd paste.
 
2021-06-09 12:00:53 PM  
Pixian douban, that is.
 
2021-06-09 12:08:13 PM  

markie_farkie: If it took an hour to cool them all (I assume you threw them all in at the same time) then the oil temp was so low that your wings probably ended up being a greasy rubbery mess when they finally looked like they were cooked.

Wing confit is NOT what you want.


Actually you should try kenji's recipe- you confirm the wings first, refreeze them then flash fry them, maximizes both the juicyness of the flesh and the crispness of the skin without overcooking the meat or undercooking the skin
 
2021-06-09 12:26:19 PM  

Sliding Carp: I just want to say that if there were a Nobel Prize for evil genius marketing, it would have been retired with the guy who convinced a nation that farking chicken wings were edible.


They're not just edible.  They're delicious.
 
2021-06-09 12:31:57 PM  
Subby, you might just want to try baking them. For extra crispiness, toss the raw wings with salt and baking powder (or baking soda, I always forget which) before baking.

Ta-da. And no messy oil cleanup.
 
2021-06-09 12:33:32 PM  

mike_d85: You didn't fry your wings, you braised them.  If you're doing that throw the fark down and get some duck fat.  Like everyone else said you crowded the pot and used the wrong oil.

Personally, I prefer a smoked wing. It's nice to throw them on when you're smoking something large like a brisket or pork but and either make yourself some lunch or an appetizer.


Yup. My wings are oil fried, air fried or smoked.
I did a batch of about 8 pounds last weekend on the pellet grill.

275 for approximately 2 hours is about right.
 
2021-06-09 1:03:51 PM  

bostonguy: Axeofjudgement: /used to have vegetarians come in to bdubs and order burgers and fries.

//when I asked them if they knew what we fried the fries in I was told "please don't ruin this for us"

Wait, they would order burgers -- but somehow knowing the frying base for the chips would spoil it for them?

And what's bdubs? Some new America chain?


Buffalo Wild Wings.
 
2021-06-09 1:09:29 PM  

bostonguy: For extra crispiness, toss the raw wings with salt and baking powder (or baking soda, I always forget which) before baking.


Now, I've got a hankering for wings. Anyone remember which one to use?
 
2021-06-09 1:16:31 PM  

bostonguy: bostonguy: For extra crispiness, toss the raw wings with salt and baking powder (or baking soda, I always forget which) before baking.

Now, I've got a hankering for wings. Anyone remember which one to use?


I think either work, but I seem to recall using baking powder.
 
2021-06-09 1:42:26 PM  

Klivian: Wait, did they fry the wings for an hour? That's not going to be edible.

/we don't RTFA 'round here


Yeah, oil choice is secondary to getting your stove checked out. I use canola oil to fry chicken, 5 or 6 minutes each side. If you're frying chicken for an hour, and not setting off smoke alarms, you're not frying chicken, you're marinating.
 
2021-06-09 2:10:20 PM  
I like to use grapeseed for sauteeing or anything that requires using the pan for a while (like pancakes/french toast; I don't have a griddle). I have avocado oil, but I haven't used it yet and only got it because I had a coupon so it was less expensive.
 
2021-06-09 2:12:50 PM  

bostonguy: Axeofjudgement: /used to have vegetarians come in to bdubs and order burgers and fries.

//when I asked them if they knew what we fried the fries in I was told "please don't ruin this for us"

Wait, they would order burgers -- but somehow knowing the frying base for the chips would spoil it for them?

And what's bdubs? Some new America chain?


Ugh sorry veggie burgers. Long day at work
 
2021-06-09 4:19:54 PM  

Cortez the Killer: bostonguy: bostonguy: For extra crispiness, toss the raw wings with salt and baking powder (or baking soda, I always forget which) before baking.

Now, I've got a hankering for wings. Anyone remember which one to use?

I think either work, but I seem to recall using baking powder.


either works as does corn starch. be careful you don't need much
 
2021-06-09 6:33:46 PM  

bostonguy: bostonguy: For extra crispiness, toss the raw wings with salt and baking powder (or baking soda, I always forget which) before baking.

Now, I've got a hankering for wings. Anyone remember which one to use?


The left and right wings are basically the same, so I no worries. Use both.
 
2021-06-09 7:09:25 PM  

bostonguy: bostonguy: For extra crispiness, toss the raw wings with salt and baking powder (or baking soda, I always forget which) before baking.

Now, I've got a hankering for wings. Anyone remember which one to use?


Baking powder is typically baking soda + cream of tartar. It's used when your other ingredients won't provide enough acid to create a reaction with alkaline baking soda.

If you're already using a dairy product in your batter (milk, buttermilk, or a condensed version of either), you should be fine with just baking soda.
 
2021-06-09 8:46:57 PM  
at home I am a convert to the baking soda method.

separate and dry.  dry very well.
very light, I mean very very light. even dusting of BS on both sides.
set a wire rack in a baking pan, cook 425 for 40-50 minutes.  I usually flip  acouple of times to keep everything nice and even.

Franks, butter, a splash of of vinegar, a dash of black pepper and garlic powder, chopped hot peppers sometimes.
 
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