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63 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 09 Jun 2021 at 8:55 AM (11 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-06-09 2:36:48 AM  
 
2021-06-09 2:45:46 AM  
Well this certainly opened my eyes a long time ago

Everlast - What it's Like (Music Video)
Youtube qA1nGPM9yHA
 
433 [TotalFark]
2021-06-09 3:43:47 AM  

make me some tea: Well this certainly opened my eyes a long time ago  (Everlast)


The magnetic tape used in music recording is expensive.  For this reason, it's often recycled.  For some unknown reason, there were a ton of masters of that insipid Everlast song.  Some friends of mine were making their record and they literally recorded over the master for "What It's Like."

Knowing that brought me a deep pleasure, even though I knew there were more out there.
 
2021-06-09 4:38:31 AM  
This one... I said yes and this year we'll be celebrating our 25th anniversary, with a lot of wonderful songs and stories in between

https://www.reverbnation.com/dangrigo​r​/song/12337977-read-to-me
 
2021-06-09 5:18:55 AM  
There are songs that I deeply associate with crossroads in my life. Letting go of anger with my father. Recovering from the aneurysm. Birth of my daughter. Realizing my marriage gone. To the point, where I can't listen to them very often because I wind up a ball of emotional yarn all tangled up and mildly soggy. But changed? Changed, not so much.
 
2021-06-09 5:20:42 AM  

hubiestubert: There are songs that I deeply associate with crossroads in my life. Letting go of anger with my father. Recovering from the aneurysm. Birth of my daughter. Realizing my marriage gone. To the point, where I can't listen to them very often because I wind up a ball of emotional yarn all tangled up and mildly soggy. But changed? Changed, not so much.


"Tie Me Kangaroo Down" is certainly a heart-wrenching song.
 
2021-06-09 6:08:17 AM  
Trick Daddy - Tonight (Feat. Jaheim & Trina)
Youtube uk3_m_YQcDE
 
2021-06-09 6:19:05 AM  
Not so much the song, but at the outro of Ants Marching by Dave Matthews Band, LeRoi Moore has a phrase he plays on the sax that has been an integral part of my life, to the point that hearing the phrase brings me to tears.
 
2021-06-09 6:47:21 AM  
I understand why people hate the Eagles, and that their stuff is tediously overplayed on "Soft Rock" stations, but I still have a soft spot for them in part because I associate the instrumental outro to Hotel California with a very powerful experience which was the first time I ever made peace with mortality as a much younger man. I'd had a rough week: I had realized I didn't believe in the religion of my youth anymore, left a cult that I'd been in for 6 years, and the girlfriend who'd helped me get through the death of my mother less than a year prior had dumped me almost immediately upon hearing about this, so I was dealing with a breakup, existential crisis, and the loss of all my friends all at once.

Anyway, I distinctly remember the experience of driving home across a bridge into a rich, bright sunset in August, with that song playing on the radio, and realizing that if this was a movie, I was in a pretty good place for it to end. I wasn't suicidal or anything, I just remember thinking that this story is over, and if the screen faded to black now and we never got to see what came after, that would be okay.

And yeah, it sounds a little stupid, but really most stories of songs "changing your life" aren't going to be about the song being magically awesome so much as catching you in just the right emotionally overwrought state some time between the ages of 18 and 25.
 
2021-06-09 6:58:06 AM  
You never know what songs prepare you for until you see a werewolf with perfect hair drinking a Pina Colada.
 
2021-06-09 7:22:08 AM  
At Trader Vic's.
 
2021-06-09 8:17:41 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-09 9:05:04 AM  
I guess it's "Highway to Hell." I was 4 when it came out and my older sister bought it. She put it on and I was just mesmerized. I just sat there transfixed with the music. We played the hell out of that album.
 
2021-06-09 9:07:32 AM  

Martian_Astronomer: And yeah, it sounds a little stupid, but really most stories of songs "changing your life" aren't going to be about the song being magically awesome so much as catching you in just the right emotionally overwrought state some time between the ages of 18 and 25.


Yep.  I associated a hair band song with the first girl I fell in love with - where I farked it up because I was a stupid kid (and we were way too young).

And in my mid to late 20's, while I was in college a friend of ours (couple friend - the wife), committed suicide.  It was a shock.  I was listening to a lot of Enigma at the time and somehow "Le Roi Est Mort, Vive Le Roi!" got associated with that....which sucked.  It took a while for that to "go away" (so to speak).
 
2021-06-09 9:18:18 AM  
Everybody knows - Leonard Cohen
Youtube Lin-a2lTelg
 
2021-06-09 9:39:02 AM  
down by law. roberto benigni, tom waits, john lurie. I scream you scream we all scream for ice cream
Youtube a_LMI0mPFMY
 
2021-06-09 10:03:51 AM  
The Star-Spangled Banner.

*salutes*
 
2021-06-09 10:43:08 AM  
Definitely a NCSB: No song has changed my life but quite a few songs are tied to pivotal moments. My wife and I had gone through a number of early pregnancy losses over the years and we were worried about our most recent pregnancy . She was already in the hospital on bed rest and we were told that it looked like the amniotic sac was slipping down into the cervix. They offered to do a radical procedure called an internal cerclage, something normally done prior to conception (essentially putting her on a sloped table so the baby would slosh to the top of the womb, opening her like a Caesarian and tying off the cervix from the inside), but this was being done at 22 weeks. My wife called me at work to tell me about it and I looked up the procedure and the odds. It had only been done on pregnant women only a handful of times at our hospital.

On my way to the hospital I turned on the radio and this song came on:
Let It Be (Remastered 2009)
Youtube QDYfEBY9NM4

When I got to the hospital we talked about it and decided to go ahead. The procedure worked and the baby was OK.

The next day, even though she never left the bed, the water broke without reason. They had to perform an emergency C-section to get him out. I held our son for about a half hour until he died in my arms. As a result of the surgical complications my wife wound up with a massive infection that has resulted in over 50 abdominal surgeries including 4 hernia repairs and countless wound treatments. She lost her job and has been on disability ever since.

Every time I hear that song I keep thinking, "What if we followed the words of the song and just let it be?" We still would have lost our son but she wouldn't have suffered as much over the following decades.
 
2021-06-09 10:52:54 AM  
Janet Jackson - If
Youtube BTSd4vqnMwo


13 year old me discovered I could jerk off to something while the sun was still up.  No need to wait for 11pm scrambled porn.
 
2021-06-09 11:13:45 AM  
This song helped me to reconsider some life choices. I'm coming up on 7 months sober, which might not seem like a lot but I'm fighting 30+ years of habitual behavior.

The Replacements - Here Comes A Regular
Youtube sdbXGi2WX0Q
 
2021-06-09 11:21:27 AM  

InfoFreako: This song helped me to reconsider some life choices. I'm coming up on 7 months sober, which might not seem like a lot but I'm fighting 30+ years of habitual behavior.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/sdbXGi2W​X0Q]


It's a beautifully haunting song, or as the Replacements would say, Sadly Beautiful.

Congrats on your 7 months,
 
2021-06-09 11:34:07 AM  

Eightballjacket: InfoFreako: This song helped me to reconsider some life choices. I'm coming up on 7 months sober, which might not seem like a lot but I'm fighting 30+ years of habitual behavior.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/sdbXGi2W​X0Q]

It's a beautifully haunting song, or as the Replacements would say, Sadly Beautiful.

Congrats on your 7 months,


Thank you.
 
2021-06-09 11:36:36 AM  

Slypork: Definitely a NCSB


I want to say something helpful but that story is bad enough that I'm mostly just afraid to say anything. Very sorry for your loss.
 
2021-06-09 11:55:13 AM  
So figure I'm 10 and a beginner violin player which may be one of the most uncool instruments in 1984 and I'm not that great at it.  And then this hits regular MTV rotation.


Slade - Run Runaway (Official Video)
Youtube gMxcGaAwy-Q


Without that rock song with prominent fiddle, there's almost no way I stick with the instrument.  And playing an instrument got me so deep into music.  And lacking that, my life is likely very, very different.
 
2021-06-09 12:04:39 PM  

Martian_Astronomer: Slypork: Definitely a NCSB

I want to say something helpful but that story is bad enough that I'm mostly just afraid to say anything. Very sorry for your loss.


Thanks. We did find a semi-silver lining. We were in the process of adopting our daughter through foster system when this happened. Because my wife was now out of work she was able to stay home with our daughter and help her development (emotional issues as well as some genetic problems). Then, when my MIL was diagnosed with Alzheimer's, she was able to come live with us and my wife could watch over her. She stayed with us until her passing almost a year ago.

So, from the heartache and horror, we've been able to help one life grow and help another on her way out.
 
2021-06-09 12:13:17 PM  
About 1969, I was a student in an 8th grade art class where the teacher allowed students to bring in music to play during class. One kid brought in In-a-Gadda-Da-Vida (full version, of course) by Iron Butterfly.

That tune completely changed me by showing me there was far more incredible music out there than what was just played on the radio.

I've been an active seeker of progressive and innovative music ever since which continues to this day ...and I have a hell of a collection to prove it.
 
2021-06-09 12:24:17 PM  

InfoFreako: This song helped me to reconsider some life choices. I'm coming up on 7 months sober, which might not seem like a lot but I'm fighting 30+ years of habitual behavior.

[YouTube video: The Replacements - Here Comes A Regular]


'Satisfied'
 
2021-06-09 12:25:08 PM  
White Punks on Dope
 
2021-06-09 12:38:27 PM  
Well, as long as we"re being serious...

This one. This one right here.

I'd post a YouTube link but it's got so many views and it hit me like a goddamn semi the first time I heard it in full.  Granted Halo borrowed it, but still...oof.
 
2021-06-09 12:48:41 PM  
Cult of Personality by Living Colour was a total game changer for me as a teenage guitarist. That solo made me rethink everything I had learned about technical playing. Literally wore out that section of the cassette tape playing it over and over trying to figure out wtf Vernon Reid was doing. In a roundabout way it also got me into jazz and helped me appreciate artists like John Coltrane.

Also, the Hokey Pokey taught me what it was all about.
 
2021-06-09 12:54:20 PM  
The Smashing Pumpkins - Try, Try, Try (Official Music Video)
Youtube 3_0d01XbXg0


If we're being serious, this song really helped me out in life.

My best friend was going down a really bad road with drugs.  I think this song played a big role for me not hitching my wagon to that train(wreck).
 
2021-06-09 1:08:19 PM  
"Everybody's Free To Wear Sunscreen" hit me like an absolute ton of bricks the first time I heard it. It was on a college station on my car radio, and I actually had to pull over because I started crying so hard. KO straight to all my feels.

Everybody's free to wear sunscreen - Baz Luhrmann (repost, with lyrics)
Youtube pVQeP5vRP5E
 
2021-06-09 1:13:22 PM  
Slypork:

I am so sorry.
 
2021-06-09 1:13:41 PM  
Stupid teenage girl story, but here goes:

Was dating a boy in high school, and Journey's "Open Arms" became our song at a school dance.  He even wrote the lyrics to the song in a Valentine's Day card.  Not long after that he broke up with me, citing some troubles at home that he didn't want to carry over to me.  I knew he was a bit of a trouble-maker, but he was always incredibly sweet with me.  For many years after that breakup if I heard that song I would literally stop in my tracks, the memories just overwhelmed me.  I would send up a small prayer that he was okay, and that things in his life were better.

Fast forward about 20 years, the song doesn't have nearly the pull, but it does make me think of him, when out of the blue he reaches out to me on Facebook.  I accept the friend request, and we share a little about our lives.  I can tell he's become far-right conservative, but I figure that's okay, I have a few 'R' friends.  I decide to pour my heart out to him in a PM about the song, and how I'd been praying for him over the years.  The first words in his response were "That's so funny, that you still listen to that genre of music..."   I told my best friend that my 16-year-old heart broke all over again.  Not long after that I unfriended him; his politics and disregard for my feelings were too much.

I can barely listen to the song any more.

/end stupid teenage girl story
 
2021-06-09 3:10:00 PM  

Myk-House of El: So figure I'm 10 and a beginner violin player which may be one of the most uncool instruments in 1984 and I'm not that great at it.  And then this hits regular MTV rotation.


[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/gMxcGaAw​y-Q?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsap​i=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&​widgetid=1]

Without that rock song with prominent fiddle, there's almost no way I stick with the instrument.  And playing an instrument got me so deep into music.  And lacking that, my life is likely very, very different.


I was a couple years older than you when that came out.  *Everyone* else in Jr High was all Van Halen and Micheal Jackson and would be like, "Who is Slade?!"  I loved this song.  I still have it on 45 somewhere.  I blew out my parents vacuum tube JVCs with this song.
 
2021-06-09 3:16:08 PM  

Slypork: Definitely a NCSB: No song has changed my life but quite a few songs are tied to pivotal moments. My wife and I had gone through a number of early pregnancy losses over the years and we were worried about our most recent pregnancy . She was already in the hospital on bed rest and we were told that it looked like the amniotic sac was slipping down into the cervix. They offered to do a radical procedure called an internal cerclage, something normally done prior to conception (essentially putting her on a sloped table so the baby would slosh to the top of the womb, opening her like a Caesarian and tying off the cervix from the inside), but this was being done at 22 weeks. My wife called me at work to tell me about it and I looked up the procedure and the odds. It had only been done on pregnant women only a handful of times at our hospital.

On my way to the hospital I turned on the radio and this song came on:
[YouTube video: Let It Be (Remastered 2009)]
When I got to the hospital we talked about it and decided to go ahead. The procedure worked and the baby was OK.

The next day, even though she never left the bed, the water broke without reason. They had to perform an emergency C-section to get him out. I held our son for about a half hour until he died in my arms. As a result of the surgical complications my wife wound up with a massive infection that has resulted in over 50 abdominal surgeries including 4 hernia repairs and countless wound treatments. She lost her job and has been on disability ever since.

Every time I hear that song I keep thinking, "What if we followed the words of the song and just let it be?" We still would have lost our son but she wouldn't have suffered as much over the following decades.


jesus christ.  i can't even imagine what that's like. 🥺
 
2021-06-09 4:13:56 PM  

UberDave: I was a couple years older than you when that came out. *Everyone* else in Jr High was all Van Halen and Micheal Jackson and would be like, "Who is Slade?!" I loved this song. I still have it on 45 somewhere. I blew out my parents vacuum tube JVCs with this song.


I have a fairly irrational love for Slade for someone born in the USA.  I tracked down everything I could find in the import areas once I discovered the good music stores with deep offerings.  This was before internet made finding such things easier.

Want to tear your voice up?  Sing along to the last verse and chorus of this (not that the earlier stuff is easy on your voice).

Slade - The Bangin' Man
Youtube 5eMUyyFXhTY
 
2021-06-09 4:20:38 PM  
only one?
No.
Each song is one of the bricks in the edifice of me, each carries part of my life.
The people who shared them with me are the mortar that holds it all together.
 
2021-06-09 4:34:47 PM  
After I heard this, I became such a Bach fan, I took up playing piano and organ, and even got Bach license plates. And I visit his grave at least twice a year.

Glenn Gould Plays Bach Concerto BWV 974
Youtube CnJhq7_Er8o
 
2021-06-09 4:56:41 PM  

Pointy Tail of Satan: After I heard this, I became such a Bach fan, I took up playing piano and organ, and even got Bach license plates. And I visit his grave at least twice a year.

[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/CnJhq7_E​r8o?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=431&enablejs​api=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.co​m&widgetid=1]


So the guy (me) posting about a British rock band rooted in the glam era happens to cite Bach as my favorite composer.  I switched from violin to viola and Bach's stuff is just the best.  Found out later that when performing his chamber music pieces, he generally played viola so it suddenly explained why the viola parts in his music were often so much better.  Douglas Adams was a HUGE Bach fan.

Adams on Bach, excerpt from Salmon of Doubt
 
2021-06-09 5:08:48 PM  

Thank You Black Jesus!: Slypork: Definitely a NCSB: No song has changed my life but quite a few songs are tied to pivotal moments. My wife and I had gone through a number of early pregnancy losses over the years and we were worried about our most recent pregnancy . She was already in the hospital on bed rest and we were told that it looked like the amniotic sac was slipping down into the cervix. They offered to do a radical procedure called an internal cerclage, something normally done prior to conception (essentially putting her on a sloped table so the baby would slosh to the top of the womb, opening her like a Caesarian and tying off the cervix from the inside), but this was being done at 22 weeks. My wife called me at work to tell me about it and I looked up the procedure and the odds. It had only been done on pregnant women only a handful of times at our hospital.

On my way to the hospital I turned on the radio and this song came on:
[YouTube video: Let It Be (Remastered 2009)]
When I got to the hospital we talked about it and decided to go ahead. The procedure worked and the baby was OK.

The next day, even though she never left the bed, the water broke without reason. They had to perform an emergency C-section to get him out. I held our son for about a half hour until he died in my arms. As a result of the surgical complications my wife wound up with a massive infection that has resulted in over 50 abdominal surgeries including 4 hernia repairs and countless wound treatments. She lost her job and has been on disability ever since.

Every time I hear that song I keep thinking, "What if we followed the words of the song and just let it be?" We still would have lost our son but she wouldn't have suffered as much over the following decades.

jesus christ.  i can't even imagine what that's like. 🥺


Did you see WandaVision? That end part where this wonderful fantasy world is destroyed and she loses the children that she had wanted with all her heart? Sort of like that. But without the magical glowing finger thingy.
 
2021-06-09 5:31:11 PM  
A double album did. In my early 20's I was at one of my lowest points. Depressed, self-injurious, and in a relationship with an abusive constantly cheating psycho who had nearly destroyed my relationship with my family and cost me a few friends.

I picked this particular album up having heard a song on a comp, and wound up listening to it all night. Stayed up listening to one disk then the other nonstop, lost in the perfect lush mood and the lyrics that so accurately reflected where i was...

"Does your memory fade
When you think about all the things that we dreamed of?
Does your heart drift away in the morning time
As frustration prevails, prevails... for awhile?"


...And where I should be in life.


"And all of this i leave behind
And i welcome better days
And in the light it flickers... the new fire. the new day"


That morning i kicked her to the curb and never looked back.
I rarely listen to it all the way through these days. I still love it immensely and always will, but some tracks are just too painful for the memories they conjure.
Lycia - The Burning Circle And Then Dust (1995)
Youtube oMq3fPDcw_c
 
2021-06-09 5:35:51 PM  

Myk-House of El: So figure I'm 10 and a beginner violin player which may be one of the most uncool instruments in 1984 and I'm not that great at it.  And then this hits regular MTV rotation.


[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/gMxcGaAw​y-Q]

Without that rock song with prominent fiddle, there's almost no way I stick with the instrument.  And playing an instrument got me so deep into music.  And lacking that, my life is likely very, very different.


To think you might have gone the Dexys Midnight Runners direction...
 
2021-06-09 5:53:11 PM  
This got me back into music after skipping most of the 90s.

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size
 
2021-06-09 6:02:53 PM  

hubiestubert: There are songs that I deeply associate with crossroads in my life. Letting go of anger with my father. Recovering from the aneurysm. Birth of my daughter. Realizing my marriage gone. To the point, where I can't listen to them very often because I wind up a ball of emotional yarn all tangled up and mildly soggy. But changed? Changed, not so much.


That's how it is for me. I've got songs that are deeply important to me but not any that have "changed my life."

I think very very few people get that kind if lightning/flash moment. My life has always only ever changed by degrees.

Lately, as I'm now within a week of hitting 48, Bob Seeger's Against the Wind is hitting pretty hard. Especially, the line "Wish I didn't know now, what I didn't know then". The last two times I've heard it things have gotten pretty dusty around here. Things are getting blurry right now just typing it.
 
2021-06-09 6:28:15 PM  

Boudyro: hubiestubert: There are songs that I deeply associate with crossroads in my life. Letting go of anger with my father. Recovering from the aneurysm. Birth of my daughter. Realizing my marriage gone. To the point, where I can't listen to them very often because I wind up a ball of emotional yarn all tangled up and mildly soggy. But changed? Changed, not so much.

That's how it is for me. I've got songs that are deeply important to me but not any that have "changed my life."

I think very very few people get that kind if lightning/flash moment. My life has always only ever changed by degrees.

Lately, as I'm now within a week of hitting 48, Bob Seeger's Against the Wind is hitting pretty hard. Especially, the line "Wish I didn't know now, what I didn't know then". The last two times I've heard it things have gotten pretty dusty around here. Things are getting blurry right now just typing it.


A little sumthin against the wind.

That's one of my favorite lines.
 
2021-06-09 7:40:43 PM  

Boudyro: hubiestubert: There are songs that I deeply associate with crossroads in my life. Letting go of anger with my father. Recovering from the aneurysm. Birth of my daughter. Realizing my marriage gone. To the point, where I can't listen to them very often because I wind up a ball of emotional yarn all tangled up and mildly soggy. But changed? Changed, not so much.
That's how it is for me. I've got songs that are deeply important to me but not any that have "changed my life."
I think very very few people get that kind if lightning/flash moment. My life has always only ever changed by degrees.
Lately, as I'm now within a week of hitting 48, Bob Seeger's Against the Wind is hitting pretty hard. Especially, the line "Wish I didn't know now, what I didn't know then". The last two times I've heard it things have gotten pretty dusty around here. Things are getting blurry right now just typing it.


I've had some great songs ruined for me, because I can't listen to them anymore. Not unless I'm in a real good mood. None of them changed me, but whatever is associated with them I don't want to think about.

/I just turned 60. //cringe
 
2021-06-09 7:50:18 PM  
Probably Dylan's Hwy 61. That whole album just knocked my socks off. And hearing Robert Johnson/Elmore James/ Muddy playing slide.
 
2021-06-09 8:31:09 PM  
Like others have said, no I don't have anything that changed my life. But I can pinpoint a moment where music really became a thing for me.

I grew up in a very religious and fairly restrictive home. I wasn't allowed to listen to current / modern music on the radio. It was always the local A.M. talk / news station or adult easy listening. This rule was so strictly enforced I actually recall one day toward the end of the school year in 6th grade I asked if we could listen to "rock music" on the way into school. My mom capitulated and I fiddled with the dial to find something. I found a station but it was was changed as soon as "Centerfold" by J. Geils came on and my mother heard the lyrics. I heard stuff at school, of course. In 8th grade There was Bon Jovi's "Slippery When Wet" and Beastie's "Licensed to Ill." I heard some Run DMC as well which I really liked.

Anyhow, early years of high school I would listen to stations under the covers at night. Sundays there was a college radio station which I could get with a little bit of static that would play Hip Hop. And that's when I heard the song.

"I Go To Work" by Kool Moe Dee.

I think it was that rapid fire lyricism that really hit me. All I knew is I HAD to get this tape. I bought it, snuck it into the house, and listened to it. Over and over. I knew (and still know) every lyric of every song from the album. I was hooked.

From there I kept listening to that half-tuned in college radio show every week and picked up new artists and songs. Boogie Down Productions "My Philosophy", Eric B and Rakim "Paid in Full", it goes on and on. Just what we now call old school golden age hip-hop. And then one day when I was sneaking a peak at MTV when my mom wasn't home, I saw the video for "I Left My Wallet in El Segundo" by Tribe. I got that tape and listened to it straight through. And it is still, 30+ years later, one of my favorite albums of all time.
 
2021-06-09 8:54:41 PM  
Jello Wiggle
Youtube -yFC8Ym4NS8
 
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