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(Imgur)   Q: How far away from a nuclear explosion would be safe? A: Six feet. What idiot would say this? Would you believe a US government agency? Bonus: Also discusses surviving a nuke in a fridge, plus whether you can outrun a nuclear explosion   (i.imgur.com) divider line
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683 clicks; posted to STEM » on 09 Jun 2021 at 7:42 AM (3 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



30 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
3 days ago  
To be honest, it would be safest to be scattered atoms in the event of a nuclear explosion.
 
3 days ago  
i.imgur.comView Full Size


What is a safe distance from a nuclear bomb?

Six feet.

What happens before a nuclear explosion?

Nothing.

Can you survive a nuclear bomb in a fridge?

Nuclear bombs are WAY too big to fit in a fridge.

Can you outrun a nuclear blast?

Sure, long as you have a 25-mile head start.
 
3 days ago  
That is a google snippet, the actual website doesn't say that. https://www.ready.gov/nuclear-explosio​n
 
3 days ago  
I'm in the "instant death, please" camp.

I don't see anything remotely fun in the "scattered bands of plucky survivors looking for love and adventure in a ruined world" fantasy
 
3 days ago  
And if you can't maintain six feet of distance, make sure to wear your mask.


Unless the nuclear explosion has been vaccinated.
 
3 days ago  

Sensei Can You See: [i.imgur.com image 703x633]

What is a safe distance from a nuclear bomb?

Six feet.

What happens before a nuclear explosion?

Nothing.

Can you survive a nuclear bomb in a fridge?

Nuclear bombs are WAY too big to fit in a fridge.

Can you outrun a nuclear blast?

Sure, long as you have a 25-mile head start.


How long do you have to stay underground after a nuclear attack?

A few billion years, I would think.
 
3 days ago  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
3 days ago  
A 1950's fridge might offer some small amount of protection but not the flimsy crap you can buy now. That ship has sailed.
 
3 days ago  
This all puts a song in my heart...

🎶Flying out of the shock wave
On that August day
All the powers that be
And the course of history
Would be changed for evermore🎶
 
3 days ago  
It always depends on the tonnage, but I go by the order-of-magnitude rule of thumb. Nowadays, most nukes will be probably in the 20-Mt range, so iirc you're vapor 2 miles from ground-zero, and you immediately have to worry about winds and blast waves up to 20 miles away, with obvious inverse-square law on the flash.

I have semi-regular nightmares about surviving these things, because it's just a farking nightmare dealing with it and the chances are always good you will, at least at first. My first thought after every flash is annoyance, like, "*sigh*. Great. Goddamnit. This was the last farking thing I needed to deal with today. Thanks, assholes."
 
3 days ago  

koder: Nowadays, most nukes will be probably in the 20-Mt range,


A lot lower than that, e.g. 350 kt for a W78. As guidance systems got better there was less need for multi-megaton yields.
 
3 days ago  
301 01 Duck and Cover parody
Youtube aLJqplsrNNY
 
3 days ago  

Ivo Shandor: koder: Nowadays, most nukes will be probably in the 20-Mt range,

A lot lower than that, e.g. 350 kt for a W78. As guidance systems got better there was less need for multi-megaton yields.


Oh great. Lemme guess, smaller yields yet more of them at the same time. Sounds like capitalism got its hands on the end times too.
 
3 days ago  
No, the government didn't say that, stupid Google AI did by just randomly picking a paragraph that had a measurement in it.  Even the snippet clearly states to "try to maintain a distance of at least six feetbetween yourself and people who are not part of your household".


That being said if you watch War Games you'd know that actually 6ft might not be such a bad idea:

WarGames (5/11) Movie CLIP - A Lesson in Futility (1983) HD
Youtube 1vmnp7ghGPk
 
3 days ago  

fragMasterFlash: A 1950's fridge might offer some small amount of protection but not the flimsy crap you can buy now. That ship has sailed.


But then you suffocate when you can't get out of the fridge.
 
3 days ago  
Can't access the link, for some reason.

Pretty sure even six feet of solid steel would be insufficient protection from a nuclear explosion on the opposite side of the metal. Anything touched by the fireball is likely to sublimate upon contact.

IIRC, the shockwaves travel at supersonic speeds, so running from a nuclear weapon detonation is likely to be a waste of effort unless you're already several dozen kilometers away and travelling away from the explosion at supersonic speed.

Hollyweird to the contrary notwithstanding, a refrigerator is unlikely to provide much protection unless it is firmly fixed in position by well-engineered supports AND several dozen kilometers (at least) from ground zero.

The only "safe" place to be during a nuclear weapon explosion is at least several hundred kilometers away and up-wind.
 
3 days ago  
Yeah, through six feet of scrith maybe
 
3 days ago  
I know a guy...who works for a defense contractor, whose job it is to know this sort of thing.

There's even a handy calculator:
fourmilab.chView Full Size
 
3 days ago  
The link to the online copy of the book and the artwork for the slide rule
 
3 days ago  

Flowery Twats: The link to the online copy of the book and the artwork for the slide rule


I've been meaning to build one of those.
 
3 days ago  

Wenchmaster: Can't access the link, for some reason.

Pretty sure even six feet of solid steel would be insufficient protection from a nuclear explosion on the opposite side of the metal. Anything touched by the fireball is likely to sublimate upon contact.

IIRC, the shockwaves travel at supersonic speeds, so running from a nuclear weapon detonation is likely to be a waste of effort unless you're already several dozen kilometers away and travelling away from the explosion at supersonic speed.

Hollyweird to the contrary notwithstanding, a refrigerator is unlikely to provide much protection unless it is firmly fixed in position by well-engineered supports AND several dozen kilometers (at least) from ground zero.

The only "safe" place to be during a nuclear weapon explosion is at least several hundred kilometers away and up-wind.


Actually, Indy would have likely survived.

INDIANA JONES 4: CRYSTAL SKULL - NUKING THE FRIDGE (Reel Physics)
Youtube foUn_6W9N-Y


The fridge would have only moved at most a few meters, and he would have maybe gotten bruised, but he would have been protected enough.

Especially since the most powerful tower shot in 1957 (when the film is set) was Plumbbob Smokey and that was only 44 kilotons.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opera​t​ion_Plumbbob

Most of the other tests were in the teens or lower, yield-wise.
 
3 days ago  

The Third Man: Sensei Can You See: [i.imgur.com image 703x633]

What is a safe distance from a nuclear bomb?

Six feet.

What happens before a nuclear explosion?

Nothing.

Can you survive a nuclear bomb in a fridge?

Nuclear bombs are WAY too big to fit in a fridge.

Can you outrun a nuclear blast?

Sure, long as you have a 25-mile head start.

How long do you have to stay underground after a nuclear attack?

A few billion years, I would think.


Depending on the yield, type (it's stupid easy to build a gun nuke) distance from the explosion, and fallout pattern, it's really only a few weeks. Depth underground during and immediately after the blast is the big factor in fallout survivability in the first place. You can be a lot closer to ground zero and survive a surface strike if you're underground.

The Nuclear Weapons Effects, Proliferation, and Policy with EMP course the AF had me take ruined a lot of things for me.

Honestly, nukes as a means of mass destruction are long gone in terms of usefulness as a deterrent. You want to destroy a country? Detonate one 40km up. Even a little one would be enough. 80% dead in a year.

/And this is one of the many reasons, "one nuke is too many" when it comes to Rocket Man or any other proliferating country.
 
3 days ago  

koder: Ivo Shandor: koder: Nowadays, most nukes will be probably in the 20-Mt range,

A lot lower than that, e.g. 350 kt for a W78. As guidance systems got better there was less need for multi-megaton yields.

Oh great. Lemme guess, smaller yields yet more of them at the same time. Sounds like capitalism got its hands on the end times too.


Well, there is a great quantity discount.
 
3 days ago  

feckingmorons: That is a google snippet, the actual website doesn't say that. https://www.ready.gov/nuclear-explosio​n


Well, it does say that, but it doesn't mean that.
 
2 days ago  

dittybopper: Wenchmaster: Can't access the link, for some reason.

Pretty sure even six feet of solid steel would be insufficient protection from a nuclear explosion on the opposite side of the metal. Anything touched by the fireball is likely to sublimate upon contact.

IIRC, the shockwaves travel at supersonic speeds, so running from a nuclear weapon detonation is likely to be a waste of effort unless you're already several dozen kilometers away and travelling away from the explosion at supersonic speed.

Hollyweird to the contrary notwithstanding, a refrigerator is unlikely to provide much protection unless it is firmly fixed in position by well-engineered supports AND several dozen kilometers (at least) from ground zero.

The only "safe" place to be during a nuclear weapon explosion is at least several hundred kilometers away and up-wind.

Actually, Indy would have likely survived.

[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/foUn_6W9​N-Y?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsap​i=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&​widgetid=1]

The fridge would have only moved at most a few meters, and he would have maybe gotten bruised, but he would have been protected enough.

Especially since the most powerful tower shot in 1957 (when the film is set) was Plumbbob Smokey and that was only 44 kilotons.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operat​ion_Plumbbob

Most of the other tests were in the teens or lower, yield-wise.


They left a couple things out in that video:

When the puffs of smoke come off the surfaces of the houses and mannequins, it's not pressure waves. It's the light from the initial fireball. Before the heat or pressure waves reach the houses, the light itself is intense enough to char any flammable surface. In Hiroshima, people far enough from the fireball to survive still suffered third-degree burns on any skin exposed to the light.

Also, since the fridge with Indy inside would have weighed 1,500 pounds, it wouldn't go flying the way it did in the movie. In fact, in the movie the fridge was thrown so far it wasn't subjected to much of the reverse pressure wave and the firestorm it would create.

If the fridge was only thrown far enough to bruise Indy a bit, he would have been incinerated when he opened the door. The house containing the fridge was blown away, along with all the other structures nearby. If Indy opened the door he would have been right in the middle of the firestorm, with hurricane winds and superheated air.

If, OTOH, he stayed inside the fridge until the worst of the wind and firestorm was past, he would have been very nicely roasted, tender and juicy and ready for fava beans and Chianti.
 
2 days ago  

Sensei Can You See: They left a couple things out in that video:


And I thought this was gonna be about the fun they had during Operation Teapot.

thumbs.gfycat.comView Full Size


I mean, besides making an iconic GIF.

Can A Metal Bowling Ball Survive Inside a Nuclear Explosion?
Youtube by1xpy8ob8E


Fark user imageView Full Size

Fark user imageView Full Size


/the point of https://apps.dtic.mil/sti/pdfs/AD0340​1​37.pdf was to figure out not only what kind of abuse a bowling ball made of steel vs aluminum could take at measured distances from Ground Zero, but you could apply what you'd learned to building a pusher plate for an Orion-tier starship.
//BALLS OF STEEL!
///BALLSBALLSBALLSSOLIDBOWLING
Fark user imageView Full Size
STEELST​EELSTEEL!
 
2 days ago  

koder: Ivo Shandor: koder: Nowadays, most nukes will be probably in the 20-Mt range,

A lot lower than that, e.g. 350 kt for a W78. As guidance systems got better there was less need for multi-megaton yields.

Oh great. Lemme guess, smaller yields yet more of them at the same time. Sounds like capitalism got its hands on the end times too.


No, increased accuracy allows you to use a smaller yield for the same practical effect,  Smaller yield means a smaller warhead.  That means increased range for the missile or bomber that carries it.

It also means you can carry more of them for a given delivery system while keeping range constant, which means you need fewer missiles and bombers to accomplish the same basic mission.

The days when missile accuracy was measured in miles are over, which is why you don't need those huge city-buster megaton weapons anymore.
 
2 days ago  

dennysgod: No, the government didn't say that, stupid Google AI did by just randomly picking a paragraph that had a measurement in it.  Even the snippet clearly states to "try to maintain a distance of at least six feetbetween yourself and people who are not part of your household".


That being said if you watch War Games you'd know that actually 6ft might not be such a bad idea:

[YouTube video: WarGames (5/11) Movie CLIP - A Lesson in Futility (1983) HD]


Stupid movie.

Don't get your information about things like nuclear war from films that are blatant propaganda.

Don't get me wrong, I enjoy the movie, as I was kind of like David Lightman back when the film came out.  But it does have a particular viewpoint, and it's important to be aware of that.
 
2 days ago  

Sensei Can You See: dittybopper: Wenchmaster: Can't access the link, for some reason.

Pretty sure even six feet of solid steel would be insufficient protection from a nuclear explosion on the opposite side of the metal. Anything touched by the fireball is likely to sublimate upon contact.

IIRC, the shockwaves travel at supersonic speeds, so running from a nuclear weapon detonation is likely to be a waste of effort unless you're already several dozen kilometers away and travelling away from the explosion at supersonic speed.

Hollyweird to the contrary notwithstanding, a refrigerator is unlikely to provide much protection unless it is firmly fixed in position by well-engineered supports AND several dozen kilometers (at least) from ground zero.

The only "safe" place to be during a nuclear weapon explosion is at least several hundred kilometers away and up-wind.

Actually, Indy would have likely survived.

[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/foUn_6W9​N-Y?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsap​i=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&​widgetid=1]

The fridge would have only moved at most a few meters, and he would have maybe gotten bruised, but he would have been protected enough.

Especially since the most powerful tower shot in 1957 (when the film is set) was Plumbbob Smokey and that was only 44 kilotons.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operat​ion_Plumbbob

Most of the other tests were in the teens or lower, yield-wise.

They left a couple things out in that video:

When the puffs of smoke come off the surfaces of the houses and mannequins, it's not pressure waves. It's the light from the initial fireball. Before the heat or pressure waves reach the houses, the light itself is intense enough to char any flammable surface. In Hiroshima, people far enough from the fireball to survive still suffered third-degree burns on any skin exposed to the light.

Also, since the fridge with Indy inside would have weighed 1,500 pounds, it wouldn't go flying the way it did in the movie. In fact, in the movie the fridge was thrown so far it wasn't subjected to much of the reverse pressure wave and the firestorm it would create.

If the fridge was only thrown far enough to bruise Indy a bit, he would have been incinerated when he opened the door. The house containing the fridge was blown away, along with all the other structures nearby. If Indy opened the door he would have been right in the middle of the firestorm, with hurricane winds and superheated air.

If, OTOH, he stayed inside the fridge until the worst of the wind and firestorm was past, he would have been very nicely roasted, tender and juicy and ready for fava beans and Chianti.


1.  It's direct thermal radiation.  He's inside a house, which blocks almost all of that, and then he's in an insulated box that's painted white, and thus the thermal radiation isn't a concern.

2.  The length of the thermal radiation pulse is directly related to the yield.  The formula is Yield^0.45, where yield is in kilotons, so the total length of the pulse for a 44 kiloton blast would be 44^0.45 = 5.5 seconds.  At Hiroshima, it was just 3 seconds total.  For a 10 megaton weapon, thermal pulse length is about 63 seconds.  I think that's why you are confused here, you're applying yields that are far too high.  You're not doing the math.


3.  For the yields we are talking about, the range is actually relatively small.  So for a 44 kt airburst, the radius of 3rd degree burns is just 3 kilometers from ground zero.  At just 5 kilometers, you only get a first degree burn.

4.  Firestorms don't invariably follow nuclear blasts.  Of the two actual use cases, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a firestorm did develop in the first, but not in the second, and there is an interesting reason why:  Breakfast.

Hiroshima was attacked at 8:15 am local time, whereas Nagasaki was attacked at 11:00 am local.  Back then, most cooking in Japanese homes was done with a ceramic charcoal brazier called a shichirin. The housewives would have cooked breakfast and perhaps rice for lunches for their husbands and children to eat at work and school for lunch, and at 8:15 am, the charcoal would have still been lit even if they were finished cooking.

Now, for a firestorm to develop, you need three things:  and adequate fuel load (suburbs aren't dense enough for this), calm weather with low winds, and thousands of simultaneous points of ignition.

The shichirin supplied those ignition sources at Hiroshima.  This is also shown by the fact that the firestorm didn't start until 20 to 30 minutes after the bomb detonated.  So it wasn't from the thermal pulse of the bomb.  But the charcoal in the shichirin were all extinguished in Nagasaki by the time the bomb was dropped there, so no firestorm despite the fact that "Fat Man" was nearly twice the yield of "Little Boy".

Also, there is a civil defense film on YouTube called "The House in the Middle", you should watch it.  Actual test on houses, and how keeping maintenance up can prevent such conflagrations.
 
1 day ago  

dittybopper: 1.  It's direct thermal radiation.  He's inside a house, which blocks almost all of that, and then he's in an insulated box that's painted white, and thus the thermal radiation isn't a concern.


I wasn't talking about the movie; I was talking about the Reel Physics video. They showed footage from a real test, and when the smoke showed up on the house, they said, more than once, that the first pressure wave was causing it. They didn't mention the thermal radiation at all.

They also said that the fridge wouldn't be thrown more than a few yards. The house it was in, though, was blown away by the initial blast, which means it would also be well within the hurricane-force winds blowing the opposite direction as the mushroom cloud started rising.

Mea culpa on saying firestorm; the small group of test houses wouldn't be able to generate a firestorm. But if the house Indy was in was blown away, leaving the fridge behind, and Indy opened the fridge door as soon as the fridge stopped moving, and he was still that close to the fireball and blast zone, he wouldn't have survived.
 
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