Skip to content
Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(National Geographic)   Ocean's 5   (nationalgeographic.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Antarctica, Southern Ocean, World Ocean, Ocean, Oceanography, National Oceanic, National Geographic Explorer, marine scientist  
•       •       •

1107 clicks; posted to STEM » on 08 Jun 2021 at 9:46 PM (3 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



20 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
3 days ago  
I'll recognize it as the Antarctic Ocean since we already have an Arctic Ocean. Southern Ocean is directionist anyway.
 
3 days ago  
Yeah, that's not new.  National Geographic is just catching up to oceanography convention now.
 
3 days ago  
Frank and Billy were robbed... again.
 
3 days ago  
Hardly news, different bodies around the world are always disputing the legitimacy of current affairs.
 
3 days ago  
But, hang on, when the magnetic pole moves and it's no longer South, what do we call it?
 
3 days ago  
Dr William Dyer knew those waters were different.

/They surround the Mountains of Madness after all
 
3 days ago  

dyhchong: But, hang on, when the magnetic pole moves and it's no longer South, what do we call it?


"We" will be long gone by then. Let that generation figure it out.
 
3 days ago  

dyhchong: But, hang on, when the magnetic pole moves and it's no longer South, what do we call it?


Change it's name to a symbol
 
3 days ago  
Ooh. Now let's talk about how many continents there are.
 
3 days ago  

Eravior: I'll recognize it as the Antarctic Ocean since we already have an Arctic Ocean. Southern Ocean is directionist anyway.


The arctic ocean doesn't have a continent sitting in the middle of it.
 
3 days ago  

leeksfromchichis: dyhchong: But, hang on, when the magnetic pole moves and it's no longer South, what do we call it?

Change it's name to a symbol


Start actually using 'geomagnetic north' or 'geographic north' instead of plain old 'north' ?
 
3 days ago  
At the very least it will make navigating the ice-wall easier.
 
jvl [BareFark]
3 days ago  

dyhchong: But, hang on, when the magnetic pole moves and it's no longer South, what do we call it?


South.
 
3 days ago  

dyhchong: But, hang on, when the magnetic pole moves and it's no longer South, what do we call it?


Old South.
 
3 days ago  

stamped human bacon: dyhchong: But, hang on, when the magnetic pole moves and it's no longer South, what do we call it?

Old South.


Once Antartica properly thaws out and is one of the last habitable places on the planet we can move in and get to polluting it properly.

Then it can be called the Dirty South.
 
3 days ago  

Petey4335: leeksfromchichis: dyhchong: But, hang on, when the magnetic pole moves and it's no longer South, what do we call it?

Change it's name to a symbol

Start actually using 'geomagnetic north' or 'geographic north' instead of plain old 'north' ?


North and South aren't even real, they're just geographic constructs!
 
3 days ago  
huh....I remember learning it as the Antarctic Ocean decades ago.
 
3 days ago  

dyhchong: But, hang on, when the magnetic pole moves and it's no longer South, what do we call it?


Technically, it will actually be the south at that point. The poles are named wrong right now.
 
2 days ago  
It was always recognized as one of the Seven Seas.
 
2 days ago  

lilbjorn: It was always recognized as one of the Seven Seas.


And if you'd got beef, you'd get capped in the knees.
 
Displayed 20 of 20 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.