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(Hemmings)   It has come to this: a mustard-yellow, 93k-mile, 1976 Datsun B210 "survivor" is listed at Hemmings for $13,500   (hemmings.com) divider line
    More: Unlikely, incident ID, English-language films  
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1043 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 08 Jun 2021 at 11:42 AM (13 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



15 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-06-08 12:15:57 PM  
Looks awfully similar to the 120Y - a staple in every UK garage at one point
 
2021-06-08 12:37:13 PM  
Yes, Datsun B210s were basic but well-made and reliable cars that have become more valuable in recent years among fans of the brand given their current scarcity as compared to their original numbers.  The same could be said for any number of other cars, such as the BMW 2002 (and now the E30), but the Datsun was a cheaper car than the BMW 2002 new and it's still worth less now.
 
2021-06-08 12:37:54 PM  
One step closer to my prophesy that a 1986 Hyundai Pony could be a collectible...
 
2021-06-08 12:44:59 PM  
They say there's a butt for every seat.  If they are lucky, they'll find the one for this car.

/I can't tell them who it will be
//But I can tell them who it won't be
 
2021-06-08 1:05:49 PM  
Just remember... that car probably got someone laid one day 173 years ago. Back in the olden times.
 
2021-06-08 2:42:10 PM  

rockymountainrider: 1986 Hyundai Pony


autos.caView Full Size


D'aaaw... it's like the DeLorian's dorky kid brother!! ^_^
 
2021-06-08 2:44:18 PM  
Nostalgia drives a lot of demand as we get older and we want to feel some of the joy we felt when we were first really free.
Price is dictated by demand and rarity so a lot of those cars and trucks we drove into the ground means that they're probably aren't a lot of Datsun's (rust buckets!) or early Honda's, Hyundais etc because we drove them like rented mules...

So somewhere out there, someone has a Sunday driven Stellar, Pony or Excel...a Gramma owned Cavalier or similar that will be a garage find and valuable to somebody because of memories and rarity.

\had my Impala
\\just sold that and my truck
\\\nobody writes songs about cruising in an Escape...yet
 
2021-06-08 2:55:29 PM  
Damn, that interior looks perfect.  Granted, when they repainted they lost the original "honeybee" name and bee emblem.

Leaned to drive in one of those, also got my license (should have used my moms auto wagon, because my left leg was shaking like a leaf.  Didn't stall).

While it looks like it might bring back my youth, those things didn't move at all.  If not for the double nickel being enforced around 1976 you'd be easily run over.  Acceleration involved downshifting (no tach), flooring it, and waiting for a downhill.  I remember my dad trying to merge, my mom yelling "speed up" and dad saying it was floored (knowing dad, he'd probably put the thing in 4th already).  Driving it would be like driving a model-T, more an exersize it making yourself easy to avoid than actually getting somewhere.

Cyberluddite: Yes, Datsun B210s were basic but well-made and reliable cars that have become more valuable in recent years among fans of the brand given their current scarcity as compared to their original numbers.  The same could be said for any number of other cars, such as the BMW 2002 (and now the E30), but the Datsun was a cheaper car than the BMW 2002 new and it's still worth less now.


While reliable, they rust like crazy.  To the point that old Datsuns *only* died through rust or being totaled.  I knew a guy with 200k+ miles on one in the 1980s (easy now, next to impossible then).  It might have Oregon tags, but if stays there a year it is rust.  It needs to go back to Arizona.
 
2021-06-08 3:32:22 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: Damn, that interior looks perfect.  Granted, when they repainted they lost the original "honeybee" name and bee emblem.

Leaned to drive in one of those, also got my license (should have used my moms auto wagon, because my left leg was shaking like a leaf.  Didn't stall).

While it looks like it might bring back my youth, those things didn't move at all.  If not for the double nickel being enforced around 1976 you'd be easily run over.  Acceleration involved downshifting (no tach), flooring it, and waiting for a downhill.  I remember my dad trying to merge, my mom yelling "speed up" and dad saying it was floored (knowing dad, he'd probably put the thing in 4th already).  Driving it would be like driving a model-T, more an exersize it making yourself easy to avoid than actually getting somewhere.

Cyberluddite: Yes, Datsun B210s were basic but well-made and reliable cars that have become more valuable in recent years among fans of the brand given their current scarcity as compared to their original numbers.  The same could be said for any number of other cars, such as the BMW 2002 (and now the E30), but the Datsun was a cheaper car than the BMW 2002 new and it's still worth less now.

While reliable, they rust like crazy.  To the point that old Datsuns *only* died through rust or being totaled.  I knew a guy with 200k+ miles on one in the 1980s (easy now, next to impossible then).  It might have Oregon tags, but if stays there a year it is rust.  It needs to go back to Arizona.


Can attest to that.  CSB:  A decade ago, I got it in my head that I wanted to restore a '67 Datsun Fairlady roadster.  Guy in Chicago had a 'running' one and a donor one in his garage, and sold me both of them for 3,000.  Buddy of mine brought his flatbed and we drove out there, under the assumption that the "running" one would be driven back to the Twin Cities, MN by me, and he would flat bed the other one back.

The running one fired right up at the turn of the key, which I found to be impressive.  We shook hands, handed over the cash, winched the donor car up on the flatbed, and hit the interstate to head back.   We got about 20 miles out of downtown Chicago when I motioned to my buddy to pull off at the next exit (it was one of the few non-toll exits heading north on 294.)  We pull off, and park in an industrial complex area off the main road, I get out and tell him "Dude, I think I'm one good pothole away from this being a Flintstone car", meaning, it felt like the floorboards were weak.  

We get out a cranker jack, and lift up one side and start peeking around underneath it with a flashlight, and sure enough, there's some serious rusting issues that were obscured by road grime.  We set it back down, I open the driver door, place one foot on the floor of the drivers side and push down, and it goes down about 2 inches...including the seat.  Yep, no way am I finishing the 5 hour drive home in this thing.  

At this point, we are stranded in an industrial park with two non-driveable datsuns and one flatbed truck that isn't long enough to fit both Datsuns bumper to bumper.   And the sun is setting.  So, we drive the running datsun over to the Walmart that was near by, and buy a 30 dollar sawzall and a pack of blades for it.  Go back to where the flatbed is, drag the non-running Fairlady off the flatbed, and proceed to cut it in half through the footwell (I only really needed the donor car for body panels anyway.).  Again, rust city.  The entire frame on that car was pitted to death.  Anyway, so, we flip the back half of the donor car over onto the front half of the donor car, and pull the "running" Fairlady up behind it on the flatbed.  At this point, there is approximately 4 inches from the rear bumper to the rear of the flatbed.  Score!

TLDR/End of the story:  The "runner" was in such sad shape from rust, that it was unsalvageable.  I ended up buying a 3rd Datsun Fairlady (1969) that was in better shape.  But by that point, I was so burned out on rotting Datsuns, that I had lost interest and was becoming project poor.  

Fun Fact:  The Datsun Fairlady Roadster will eventually need ball joints replaced.  When I was building mine, there were 3 pairs of them left in existence, and nobody was making reproductions of them.  At the time, a pair was 600.  Which was too rich for my blood.  I waited a bit and saved some cash, then checked again when I was getting closer to my goal....2 sets left, 1200 each.  And that is when I sold the entire project off and bought a 370Z and washed my hands of it.
 
2021-06-08 3:32:57 PM  
Make it look like this, and add some racing history and I'm in.

live.staticflickr.comView Full Size
 
2021-06-08 3:59:59 PM  
I'd rather have a 510. But for the right Nerd, I could see this.
 
2021-06-08 6:44:30 PM  
Oooh, those hubcaps!
 
2021-06-08 7:22:34 PM  
I kinda love it. Not going to lie.

But my first car was a 3cyl Geo Metro - so my tastes are adjusted appropriately. Nothing quite says automotive freedom like a car that gets 40mpg in 1995.

"Hey you want to go drive around" "where to?" "I dunno like to the grand canyon?" "why not, I've got 5 bucks"
 
2021-06-08 8:52:08 PM  
My favorite car of all ive had was my 74 datsun 200sx, picked up at auction for 4 grand. Good 4 banger, 5 speed, and that car absolutely wanted to stay with me. After i graduated high school my folks got me a mustang lx so i reluctantly let it go.   This one is going for 13.5 k, thats silly. My 93 ford f150 ran 14,200 brand new with 37 miles on it...
 
2021-06-08 10:51:02 PM  
Last time I encountered one of those, it actually exploded, its metal innards flying up through the air and landing all around me.

It was literally raining Datsun cogs.


/story may not actually be true
 
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