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(Twitter)   He's a real problem-solver, but Darwin is waiting in the wings   (twitter.com) divider line
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551 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 08 Jun 2021 at 12:35 PM (12 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



32 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-06-08 11:22:10 AM  
Original Tweet:

 
2021-06-08 12:50:42 PM  
He clearly doesn't understand the law of gravity. But I'm pretty sure he never studied law.
 
2021-06-08 12:53:58 PM  
Woah.  Hold a straightedge to the ladder beam he's standing on; he's putting something close to a 10 degree deflection into it.
 
2021-06-08 12:56:10 PM  

lizyrd: Woah.  Hold a straightedge to the ladder beam he's standing on; he's putting something close to a 10 degree deflection into it.


Well yeah, they're not built to take your weight in that direction.
 
2021-06-08 12:58:15 PM  
Like a nervous magician?
 
2021-06-08 1:03:35 PM  
Trump fan.
 
2021-06-08 1:07:35 PM  
I want to believe he's a burglar who is about to be handed a 40inch zenith space command television.
 
2021-06-08 1:13:17 PM  
Big because you need to see it well to appreciate it's true glory...

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-08 1:25:08 PM  
I'm guessing the folks I see in these pictures just have like zero fear of heights. I'd be shaking my ass off attempting something like that.
 
2021-06-08 1:43:26 PM  
Like my friend said, 'If it works, it aint stu.."   I miss that s.o.b.
 
2021-06-08 1:55:53 PM  

lizyrd: Woah.  Hold a straightedge to the ladder beam he's standing on; he's putting something close to a 10 degree deflection into it.


Yes, that's the biggest issue here
 
2021-06-08 1:59:51 PM  
We built community tree forts with scavenged lumber as kids.  There was always that one idiot kid who always made the choices with the least structural integrity.
 
2021-06-08 2:11:17 PM  

NateAsbestos: lizyrd: Woah.  Hold a straightedge to the ladder beam he's standing on; he's putting something close to a 10 degree deflection into it.

Yes, that's the biggest issue here


It's certainly near the top of the list.

I read the book Educated a few month ago, and this picture (and the tree one up thread) reminded me of was  how many huge setbacks her family created for themselves through shear stupidity like this.  Stupid construction/industrial accidents that left people crippled that wouldn't have happened if they had half an ounce of sense between them, car accidents that wiped out assets vital to their livelihood with no insurance.  It's hard to climb out of the hole when you keep digging down.
 
2021-06-08 2:20:01 PM  
Dude, seriously, if you're going to improvise like that, you have to make sure you secure everything properly.
Learn from this guy:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-08 2:23:16 PM  

NateAsbestos: lizyrd: Woah.  Hold a straightedge to the ladder beam he's standing on; he's putting something close to a 10 degree deflection into it.

Yes, that's the biggest issue here


It's damn near the biggest. Everything else he's doing is stupid, but so long as he makes no mistakes he's fine. The load he's putting on the ladder is about as opposite as possible to design strength. A catastrophic failure of that ladder is leading the list of dangers in that picture.
 
2021-06-08 2:38:24 PM  
Pfft - amateur - try building a Zeppelin ship on four-to-six story tall ladders on wheels.

(Note the guys at the nose cone - the Hindenburg was 135 feet circumference - sorry, my math sucks - I'm thinking that's about 65-70 feet straight up???  Is that close???)

i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2021-06-08 2:48:53 PM  
I've put up siding using shakier ladder systems than that.  (Siding is a pain - you have to traverse side to side to nail it in, so you need multiple ladders, or a scaffold system, which is what this thing approximates.) Two ladders tied together gives you a ton of stability.  Notice also that the tops of the support ladders are close to the eaves - they can't slide far.  The support ladders are probably at a good angle out from the house - you can't tell because of the camera angle.
I wouldn't be thrilled to be out in the middle of that cross-ladder without anything to hang on to (I'd rig some kind of anchor inside that window, tie a rope to it, and clip into that with a waist harness), but again, his feet are probably further from the wall than you think.  He's not falling backwards unless somebody pushes him.

That said, there are some good, and cheaply rentable, scaffold systems on the market, that give you a lot more stability, and a handrail.   Not that I've ever used them.  "One tall ladder will be enough for that one little section up on that gable.  I'll be done in half an hour."
 
2021-06-08 3:01:01 PM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: Big because you need to see it well to appreciate it's true glory...

[Fark user image 640x960]


Holy shiat that looks dangerous...scroll down....JFC. How is that guy still alive?
 
2021-06-08 3:02:35 PM  
the Hindenburg was 135 feet circumference


No, it was 135 feet in diameter.  (It was 800 feet long - longer than the US Capitol is wide.)

That does indeed put those nose ladder tops at least 60 feet off the ground, depending on the size of that hexagonal nose-piece.  And it looks like there's some space between the bottom ribs and the ground, so 70 feet is quite plausible.
 
2021-06-08 3:13:48 PM  
He really should be wearing a shirt and using sunscreen.
 
2021-06-08 3:35:17 PM  
Lollin' pretty hard at the people insisting the ANGLE of the ladder is the problem here
 
2021-06-08 3:39:58 PM  

NateAsbestos: Lollin' pretty hard at the people insisting the ANGLE of the ladder is the problem here


They're talking about the bend in the ladder he's standing on.
 
2021-06-08 3:43:18 PM  

nartreb: I've put up siding using shakier ladder systems than that.  (Siding is a pain - you have to traverse side to side to nail it in, so you need multiple ladders, or a scaffold system, which is what this thing approximates.) Two ladders tied together gives you a ton of stability.  Notice also that the tops of the support ladders are close to the eaves - they can't slide far.  The support ladders are probably at a good angle out from the house - you can't tell because of the camera angle.
I wouldn't be thrilled to be out in the middle of that cross-ladder without anything to hang on to (I'd rig some kind of anchor inside that window, tie a rope to it, and clip into that with a waist harness), but again, his feet are probably further from the wall than you think.  He's not falling backwards unless somebody pushes him.

That said, there are some good, and cheaply rentable, scaffold systems on the market, that give you a lot more stability, and a handrail.   Not that I've ever used them.  "One tall ladder will be enough for that one little section up on that gable.  I'll be done in half an hour."


I'm thinking the vertical ladders on the side are each made of two smaller ladders lashed or taped together to get the total height.
 
2021-06-08 3:44:43 PM  
At least that one on the right. Left looks like a regular extension ladder.
 
2021-06-08 3:47:02 PM  

sxacho: nartreb: I've put up siding using shakier ladder systems than that.  (Siding is a pain - you have to traverse side to side to nail it in, so you need multiple ladders, or a scaffold system, which is what this thing approximates.) Two ladders tied together gives you a ton of stability.  Notice also that the tops of the support ladders are close to the eaves - they can't slide far.  The support ladders are probably at a good angle out from the house - you can't tell because of the camera angle.
I wouldn't be thrilled to be out in the middle of that cross-ladder without anything to hang on to (I'd rig some kind of anchor inside that window, tie a rope to it, and clip into that with a waist harness), but again, his feet are probably further from the wall than you think.  He's not falling backwards unless somebody pushes him.

That said, there are some good, and cheaply rentable, scaffold systems on the market, that give you a lot more stability, and a handrail.   Not that I've ever used them.  "One tall ladder will be enough for that one little section up on that gable.  I'll be done in half an hour."

I'm thinking the vertical ladders on the side are each made of two smaller ladders lashed or taped together to get the total height.


I hadn't noticed that.  The one on the left could be a regular extension ladder.  But the one on the right definitely looks like two different ladders.  Holy shiat...
 
2021-06-08 3:51:33 PM  

Russ1642: NateAsbestos: Lollin' pretty hard at the people insisting the ANGLE of the ladder is the problem here

They're talking about the bend in the ladder he's standing on.


I read it as the fact that the left side was higher than the right -- the slope of the ladder.

If anything that should deflect some miniscule portion of his downward weight vector along the length of the ladder, where it SHOULD go. Still a really bad idea, but if we're dead set on having a bridge between the two ladders...

Or, he could have just moved one of the upright ladders over.
 
2021-06-08 4:05:43 PM  

NateAsbestos: Russ1642: NateAsbestos: Lollin' pretty hard at the people insisting the ANGLE of the ladder is the problem here

They're talking about the bend in the ladder he's standing on.

I read it as the fact that the left side was higher than the right -- the slope of the ladder.

If anything that should deflect some miniscule portion of his downward weight vector along the length of the ladder, where it SHOULD go. Still a really bad idea, but if we're dead set on having a bridge between the two ladders...

Or, he could have just moved one of the upright ladders over.


You read it wrong, then.  And a ladder is absolutely not designed to accept force from the inside of the beam pushing outward. The beam isn't, the rungs aren't. And the biggest ladders that can handle hundreds of pounds 100 feet out still fail when loaded improperly (in this case, likely a torsional load was placed on the truss):

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-08 5:06:40 PM  

lizyrd: NateAsbestos: Russ1642: NateAsbestos: Lollin' pretty hard at the people insisting the ANGLE of the ladder is the problem here

They're talking about the bend in the ladder he's standing on.

I read it as the fact that the left side was higher than the right -- the slope of the ladder.

If anything that should deflect some miniscule portion of his downward weight vector along the length of the ladder, where it SHOULD go. Still a really bad idea, but if we're dead set on having a bridge between the two ladders...

Or, he could have just moved one of the upright ladders over.

You read it wrong, then.  And a ladder is absolutely not designed to accept force from the inside of the beam pushing outward. The beam isn't, the rungs aren't. And the biggest ladders that can handle hundreds of pounds 100 feet out still fail when loaded improperly (in this case, likely a torsional load was placed on the truss):

[Fark user image 425x282]


A lot of Mechanical Engineer like talk 'in here !
 
2021-06-08 5:11:27 PM  
If he's working for somebody, I bet they don't have any Workers Comp insurance, either.  A-holes that make their workers do stuff like that usually don't.
 
2021-06-08 5:14:25 PM  
Don't know where this is happening but in many places the home owner can be held personally liable when contractors do unsafe things that should be obvious to anyone. Dude's working over 3m (10 feet) so he should have a safety harness and be tied off, then there's the abomination of the ladders.

Personally I won't allow a contractor in my home if they aren't licensed, don't have current WSIB coverage, and at least 2 million in liability insurance. And I'll issue a stop work order in a heartbeat if I see anything remotely unsafe. Roofers are the worst for this as they hate wearing harnesses and hardhats, but they sure as hell don't turn down the WSIB money when they get hurt. I don't really care if Jethro is just trying to make a few bucks to get by and can't afford pump jacks, safety harnesses, scaffolding, etc. Do it right (which includes safely) or find another job.
 
2021-06-08 5:52:37 PM  
Will he lose his balance, or will the wood finally break?

I'm guessing the former but its probably the ladder.
 
2021-06-08 6:28:10 PM  

dsmith42: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: Big because you need to see it well to appreciate it's true glory...

[Fark user image 640x960]

Holy shiat that looks dangerous...scroll down....JFC. How is that guy still alive?


Apparently more than one person attempted to warn this guy - even the cops showed up.  He remained adamant he wanted to do it that way and they could all fark the hell off.  Cops shrugged and bailed as it wasn't illegal, just incredibly stupid.
 
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