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(BBC-US)   A lot of bosses still don't get it that the pandemic changed a lot of things about remote work   (bbc.com) divider line
    More: Facepalm, Productivity, Carnegie Mellon University, Laborer, Organizational studies, pandemic workforce, remote work, UK survey, hard worker  
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1019 clicks; posted to Business » on 08 Jun 2021 at 8:26 AM (2 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



31 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-06-08 8:27:08 AM  
To justify the existence of certain middle management jobs.
 
2021-06-08 8:31:22 AM  
Lumburgs think they deserve employment too when they do not.

Lotta Lumburgs worried they might have to actually produce actual work in the new normal. Can't lounge around and socialize with a cup of coffee all day, being useless.
 
2021-06-08 8:46:15 AM  
My boss before work restrictions were lifted:  "Oh sure, I can see a hybrid office/WFH schedule being permanent."

My boss the minute the restrictions were lifted:  "Everyone - back to the office!"
 
2021-06-08 8:51:11 AM  
Remember when office work was like this
coyotepr.ukView Full Size

Instead of like this
ychef.files.bbci.co.ukView Full Size
 
2021-06-08 9:24:18 AM  
This will self-correct. Businesses that enable permanent work-from-home arrangements with all the necessary technical and organizational support (to include ways to monitor employees) will find they can recruit and retain the very best talent regardless of physical location. For many employees, that's a dream result. The employers who embrace this culture shift will be very successful.

Oh, but as for the employees? Well, see, for now this means that businesses can attract the best domestic talent away from their competitors. Before long, you'll see these businesses start to consider international talent more seriously. With the right technical and organizational support system in place, it's really not a problem to have employees around the world. American engineers and software developers, for example, will have to start competing for their jobs against those who can do it cheaper (maybe quality suffers, but sometimes businesses are okay with that trade). It'll be like the loss of domestic manufacturing--labor is far cheaper elsewhere.
 
2021-06-08 9:39:29 AM  

fortheloveofgod: My boss before work restrictions were lifted:  "Oh sure, I can see a hybrid office/WFH schedule being permanent."

My boss the minute the restrictions were lifted:  "Everyone - back to the office!"


Absolutely this...after months of messages about how we'll look at hybrid solutions we got word yesterday that we'll all be required to work pre-covid rules in a few weeks.  It will be interesting to see how many people leave for remote work in the next few months.
 
2021-06-08 9:56:53 AM  

Flowery Twats: Remember when office work was like this
[coyotepr.uk image 500x229]
Instead of like this
[ychef.files.bbci.co.uk image 850x477]


Don't forget to adjust the onion on your belt
 
2021-06-08 10:00:58 AM  
The pandemic didn't change anything, a lot of people who thought stuff was going to magically change for them thought that it had.

No one likes what they were forced into, and businesses were forced into it.

Now why companies that sell telecommuting software aren't adopting it to show how a large company can indeed run this way to sell more I'll never know. "Hell ya we can sell you this multi-million dollar solution to let your employees work anywhere in the world just like they were in the office. Dear god no we wouldn't run our own business that way."
 
2021-06-08 10:10:47 AM  
The boss of my small company has been against WFH since the beginning and our office has been open and operating. Granted, we have a lot of space and few people (which really doesn't matter with antiquated HVAC).

I was ready to give my notice yesterday, I am moving on, for several reasons, but the boss didn't come in, she was doing marketing, from home.

*shrug*
 
2021-06-08 10:20:09 AM  
Being "present" used to be my biggest problem, which is why I was constantly being fired from every job I had.  My production (sales) was usually top 10%, but not coming in to the office at the exact right time really rubbed my superiors the wrong way.  So, I started my own company, worked when I wanted to, sold it to a Private Equity firm, and retired in my early 40s.

Being "present" isn't nearly as important as being productive.  I made sure my employees knew that too.
 
2021-06-08 10:50:24 AM  

Dan_Deadman: fortheloveofgod: My boss before work restrictions were lifted:  "Oh sure, I can see a hybrid office/WFH schedule being permanent."

My boss the minute the restrictions were lifted:  "Everyone - back to the office!"

Absolutely this...after months of messages about how we'll look at hybrid solutions we got word yesterday that we'll all be required to work pre-covid rules in a few weeks.  It will be interesting to see how many people leave for remote work in the next few months.


The thing is all-remote jobs are scarce.  It's clear that the majority of employees prefer all or mostly remote work.  If some employers allow that, and some don't, it'll soon be clear that the employers that allow remote work will be able to get away with paying less because employees prefer it (supply/demand).  And that's not even including the "India" factor here, in that if your job can be done 100% remotely, a guy in India probably can do it for 20% of your salary.
 
2021-06-08 10:50:35 AM  

roostercube: This will self-correct. Businesses that enable permanent work-from-home arrangements with all the necessary technical and organizational support (to include ways to monitor employees) will find they can recruit and retain the very best talent regardless of physical location. For many employees, that's a dream result. The employers who embrace this culture shift will be very successful.

Oh, but as for the employees? Well, see, for now this means that businesses can attract the best domestic talent away from their competitors. Before long, you'll see these businesses start to consider international talent more seriously. With the right technical and organizational support system in place, it's really not a problem to have employees around the world. American engineers and software developers, for example, will have to start competing for their jobs against those who can do it cheaper (maybe quality suffers, but sometimes businesses are okay with that trade). It'll be like the loss of domestic manufacturing--labor is far cheaper elsewhere.


If by have to start competing with foreign labor you mean have been for the past two decades. Then yeah we'll get ready I guess.
 
2021-06-08 10:52:09 AM  

Flowery Twats: Remember when office work was like this
[coyotepr.uk image 500x229]
Instead of like this
[ychef.files.bbci.co.uk image 850x477]


I don't remember ever being forced to sit in an office under bright spotlights staring at computers that are turned off like the second pic, no.

However, the first pic resonates - yeah, I remember being stuck in a horrible cube farm hours before or after most people in order to avoid a terrible commute or needing to get worked finished before said exhausting commute. It's far better now that I save at least 2 hours a day and be more productive as a result.
 
2021-06-08 10:52:48 AM  
Anyone who thought that remote work was here to stay is a fool.
 
2021-06-08 10:55:30 AM  

roostercube: This will self-correct. Businesses that enable permanent work-from-home arrangements with all the necessary technical and organizational support (to include ways to monitor employees) will find they can recruit and retain the very best talent regardless of physical location. For many employees, that's a dream result. The employers who embrace this culture shift will be very successful.

Oh, but as for the employees? Well, see, for now this means that businesses can attract the best domestic talent away from their competitors. Before long, you'll see these businesses start to consider international talent more seriously. With the right technical and organizational support system in place, it's really not a problem to have employees around the world. American engineers and software developers, for example, will have to start competing for their jobs against those who can do it cheaper (maybe quality suffers, but sometimes businesses are okay with that trade). It'll be like the loss of domestic manufacturing--labor is far cheaper elsewhere.


In the end I think that it will be a wash, if not slightly worse, for employees once people have that kind of economic and geographic mobility, even just domestically.  Being in a location was job security in itself...guess what, guy who works in Omaha that didn't like his 20 minute commute?  You are now competing with all of talent moving away cities like San Francisco and NYC.  At least they won't have to drive to office to get fired.
 
2021-06-08 11:17:32 AM  
I'm a people manager... 

I have lots of conflicting thoughts here. My team operates pretty darn well considering we've been remote since last March.  I'm not really a micro-manager, I trust the crap out of everyone on my team, and we've got a wide range of complex work that I'd never be able to keep up with anyway... so I think we're managing OK so far.

The challenges ahead though are not small, I'm not really sure what happens when we start hiring new people (currently wrapping the first round since all this began) and I'm anxious about bringing these new people into an existing community of individuals that all knew each other in meat-space prior to covid. I think it will be harder to learn when not given the frequent opportunity to eaves-drop on technical conversations from more senior folk on the team.  That background radiation of information, what I think we used to call "learning by osmosis" is gone, and I'm worried! 

I'd guess that long term, teams like mine will be able to survive fully remote, but that to have the best mix of culture, sense of identity, high levels of trust and cooperation etc, we'll need a limited degree of in person collaboration in the future.  Is that once a month, week, more or less frequent I don't know... but all screens all the time farking blows and I don't think even a large minority would disagree with that statement.
 
2021-06-08 11:32:54 AM  
I work for a multi national engineering and operations firm. Most engineering staff is asking to stay remote while most of the operations staff is asking to return to work. The engineering staff have proven that they are more than capable of handling their work from home and don't think that the office is needed.

I work for the engineering branch, however I've been seconded to the operations group for a temporary assignment so I see both side's points of view.

The biggest challenge I see coming up is that a full remote office set up does nothing to help new staff (esp not college grads) integrate and learn the practices, guidelines and standards of the company. The current staff were all trained in house and are fully integrated team members, but the second a new team member is added the work slows down and things start to become fractured because the new staff aren't up to speed with company standards and policy. The face time in the office for the engineering teams was / is critical for integrating new staff and keeping things running smoothly. I don't believe any of my engineering counterparts have thought at all about how to integrate new staff because they don't have to, they just see themselves as being fully capable of being remote workers and its up to the management to figure out how to get the new staff up to speed. A big part of getting new staff up to speed is interpersonal contact in an office and its a massive blind spot for our engineering branch as they just don't see it.
 
2021-06-08 11:37:26 AM  

SmellsLikePoo: I'm a people manager... 

I have lots of conflicting thoughts here. My team operates pretty darn well considering we've been remote since last March.  I'm not really a micro-manager, I trust the crap out of everyone on my team, and we've got a wide range of complex work that I'd never be able to keep up with anyway... so I think we're managing OK so far.

The challenges ahead though are not small, I'm not really sure what happens when we start hiring new people (currently wrapping the first round since all this began) and I'm anxious about bringing these new people into an existing community of individuals that all knew each other in meat-space prior to covid. I think it will be harder to learn when not given the frequent opportunity to eaves-drop on technical conversations from more senior folk on the team.  That background radiation of information, what I think we used to call "learning by osmosis" is gone, and I'm worried! 

I'd guess that long term, teams like mine will be able to survive fully remote, but that to have the best mix of culture, sense of identity, high levels of trust and cooperation etc, we'll need a limited degree of in person collaboration in the future.  Is that once a month, week, more or less frequent I don't know... but all screens all the time farking blows and I don't think even a large minority would disagree with that statement.


Get them on a Discord server.
 
2021-06-08 12:03:53 PM  
We are on a hybrid schedule from now on from what I heard there was a big pushback from a lot of the people with experience about coming back. I have been one week on/ one week off for over a year and can only do about 30% of my job from home. Spent most of last year trying to train my counterpart who left this place a mess for me every Monday. I do wish more places would embrace the hybrid schedule because having all those people back on the roads has sucked. Plus a lot of people here have been so much more productive when they can just get their work done and not have to look busy or play some stupid office politics.
 
2021-06-08 12:14:59 PM  

Geotpf: Dan_Deadman: fortheloveofgod: My boss before work restrictions were lifted:  "Oh sure, I can see a hybrid office/WFH schedule being permanent."

My boss the minute the restrictions were lifted:  "Everyone - back to the office!"

Absolutely this...after months of messages about how we'll look at hybrid solutions we got word yesterday that we'll all be required to work pre-covid rules in a few weeks.  It will be interesting to see how many people leave for remote work in the next few months.

The thing is all-remote jobs are scarce.  It's clear that the majority of employees prefer all or mostly remote work.  If some employers allow that, and some don't, it'll soon be clear that the employers that allow remote work will be able to get away with paying less because employees prefer it (supply/demand).  And that's not even including the "India" factor here, in that if your job can be done 100% remotely, a guy in India probably can do it for 20% of your salary.


Not really. There's a lot of cultural knowledge and assumptions someone working transnationally will be unlikely to know or be proficient at. They've already outsourced the work from home they can outsource.
 
2021-06-08 12:34:58 PM  
I accepted a job with a 20% raise that would have been in the office four days a week with one day working from home. I went to put in notice with my boss, but she preempted me by letting me know that I was going to be permanent WFH for the fall.

Needless to say, I withdrew my acceptance, even after they nearly doubled the raise. You can't put a price on that lack of commute and the ability to live wherever you want. Well, you can, but it's high.
 
2021-06-08 12:48:56 PM  
FTFA:
The first is the 'mere-exposure effect', which holds that the more a person is exposed to someone or something, the more they start to grow affinity.

I think they misspelled 'distain'
 
2021-06-08 12:49:19 PM  

Flowery Twats: Remember when office work was like this
[coyotepr.uk image 500x229]
Instead of like this
[ychef.files.bbci.co.uk image 850x477]


Fortunately I worked for a company who had a rather senior executive (who I got to know fairly well) who actually cared about productivity.

We all have private offices.

Contractors would be doubled up if we ran out of space, but that hasn't been an issue in a very long time.
 
2021-06-08 1:55:08 PM  
This stupid shoat of everyone having to sit in an office for at least 40 hours per week, even if they're doing 30 hours of work or doing 40 hours of work in 30 hours, disgusts me. It disgusted me before the pandemic, and now it disgusts me even more.

Employers were definitively shown that this silly charade is not necessary, and here they are acting like it's important again.

Farking idiots.
 
2021-06-08 2:05:12 PM  

DuneClimber: This stupid shoat of everyone having to sit in an office for at least 40 hours per week, even if they're doing 30 hours of work or doing 40 hours of work in 30 hours, disgusts me. It disgusted me before the pandemic, and now it disgusts me even more.

Employers were definitively shown that this silly charade is not necessary, and here they are acting like it's important again.

Farking idiots.


Ignoring those who just doing this so they can middle management by standing over your shoulder, there is definitely a worry about a lack of "water cooler time"; informal conversations between different employees that are neigh impossible to replicate virtually.  Lose that, and productivity suffers, or so the thinking goes.
 
2021-06-08 2:53:30 PM  
I'm in the office not being very productive, so I'm really getting a kick...
 
2021-06-08 3:05:56 PM  
Most people want to work and be left alone to do it. The worst part of an office is all the time wasting thought up by coworkers and bosses alike.
 
2021-06-08 7:07:32 PM  
I love companies that don't offer work from home. We keep hiring their best employees.
 
2021-06-08 7:26:20 PM  

Flowery Twats: Remember when office work was like this
[coyotepr.uk image 500x229]
Instead of like this
[ychef.files.bbci.co.uk image 850x477]


why are they staring at turned off monitors?

reminds me of the "tour" globetrotters got of a North Korean Computer lab.

hint it was quiet since no one knew how to type or use a computer.
 
2021-06-08 7:30:55 PM  

FleshMonkey: Get them on a Discord server.


the olds don't want to, hence the problem.

/similar at my work
 
2021-06-08 9:35:08 PM  

Hyjamon: Flowery Twats: Remember when office work was like this
[coyotepr.uk image 500x229]
Instead of like this
[ychef.files.bbci.co.uk image 850x477]

why are they staring at turned off monitors?

reminds me of the "tour" globetrotters got of a North Korean Computer lab.

hint it was quiet since no one knew how to type or use a computer.


It's like the opposite of that NCIS gif with the 3 morons typing on the same keyboard.
 
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