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(The Verge)   If you tout your laptop as having "unprecedented upgradeability" it generally helps that it actually be upgradeable. We're looking at you, Dell   (theverge.com) divider line
    More: Fail, Personal computer, Advanced Micro Devices, Alienware, Upgrade, Central processing unit, Dell, 9th Gen Intel CPU options, Motherboard  
•       •       •

1076 clicks; posted to Business » on 07 Jun 2021 at 9:43 AM (5 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



41 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
5 days ago  
Are laptops really designed to be upgrade-able?
 
5 days ago  
"Unprecedented" is a useful word.

It could mean it is the first that cannot, in any possible way, be upgraded.

So stop yer biatchin'.
 
5 days ago  

wejash: "Unprecedented" is a useful word.

It could mean it is the first that cannot, in any possible way, be upgraded.

So stop yer biatchin'.


Given that Apple laptops exist, this seems unlikely.
 
5 days ago  
I've had Dell laptops and would not recommend them to anyone. I know everyone has personal choices and experiences with different brands, but fark Dell.

My best experience has been with a Lenovo that has been running like brand new since 2016 (granted I updated to an SSD)

Clients either send me ThinkBooks or Dell Business laptops to use. Have yet to have a problem with any work computers, and have yet to ever be sent an HP.

/cannot find a comparable Lenovo to replace this one when I need to
//Y50-70
///open to suggestions
 
5 days ago  
Figured it was a chipset issue.
 
5 days ago  

OhioUGrad: I've had Dell laptops and would not recommend them to anyone. I know everyone has personal choices and experiences with different brands, but fark Dell.

My best experience has been with a Lenovo that has been running like brand new since 2016 (granted I updated to an SSD)

Clients either send me ThinkBooks or Dell Business laptops to use. Have yet to have a problem with any work computers, and have yet to ever be sent an HP.

/cannot find a comparable Lenovo to replace this one when I need to
//Y50-70
///open to suggestions


We have Dells here, and once in a while we get a dud but they're otherwise quite reliable.  Though, these are laptops and computers that are offered to businesses and the federal government.

Now, their consumer computers are truly hit-or-miss.  I had an XPS way back in the day and it was nothing but trouble.  So I build my own goddamn computer and haven't had a problem with it for 7 years now.
 
5 days ago  

Merltech: Are laptops really designed to be upgrade-able?


Yes and no.  Even though they're exceedingly rare, some laptops do have actual CPU and GPU sockets.  They're typically a pain to get to though, and are really limited by system cooling and power limits.

The big issue is as laptop motherboards aren't standardized like desktop boards, if manufacturers decide to drop support for a specific system your SOL.

Going by the article, some people are finding this out the hard way.
 
5 days ago  
The idea of an upgradeable laptop is neat and all, and certainly a selling point for many enthusiast buyers, but when it all comes down to it, probably less than 5% actually upgrade. For Dell, it was simple math that squelched any actual future upgrades (though I'm sure you could get a 2080 module to replace the 2070... just not the "Super" iterations, in this case).

So the expectations of any "upgradeable" laptop need to be tempered by reality.

It is less rare that desktops are upgraded, of course, but again, most times, particularly for enthusiasts, it's easier just to replace the entire PC if it's more than 3 or 4 years old - when it comes to CPUs (and sometimes GPUs), that is. Easier upgrades, like SSDs replacing platter drives or adding memory were simple enough to do, but newer systems usually come well enough equipped in those areas now.

I mean, I just built a system with a 2TB NVME boot drive (Samsung 980 Pro), a 4TB NVME data drive, AMD 5900X 12-core CPU, 64GB DDR4-3600 RAM, and managed to acquire an RTX3070. What am I, realistically, going to upgrade on this system in the next 3 years? 4 more cores? A faster GPU? Neither of those upgrades are worth the expense they'd incur. By the time I need to upgrade, I'd need to replace the motherboard (AM4 will be EOL on this generation), which means new RAM (DDR5) and CPU... might as well do the rest of it as well.

Laptops also have their own issues with upgrading.... faster GPUs and CPUs need more cooling and power. M.2 sockets have widely varying standards (Gen 3, Gen4? big difference in NVME speeds) - there will always be limitations.
 
5 days ago  

LesserEvil: I mean, I just built a system with a 2TB NVME boot drive (Samsung 980 Pro), a 4TB NVME data drive, AMD 5900X 12-core CPU, 64GB DDR4-3600 RAM, and managed to acquire an RTX3070. What am I, realistically, going to upgrade on this system in the next 3 years? 4 more cores? A faster GPU? Neither of those upgrades are worth the expense they'd incur. By the time I need to upgrade, I'd need to replace the motherboard (AM4 will be EOL on this generation), which means new RAM (DDR5) and CPU... might as well do the rest of it as well.


Monster Cables!
 
5 days ago  

Target Builder: LesserEvil: I mean, I just built a system with a 2TB NVME boot drive (Samsung 980 Pro), a 4TB NVME data drive, AMD 5900X 12-core CPU, 64GB DDR4-3600 RAM, and managed to acquire an RTX3070. What am I, realistically, going to upgrade on this system in the next 3 years? 4 more cores? A faster GPU? Neither of those upgrades are worth the expense they'd incur. By the time I need to upgrade, I'd need to replace the motherboard (AM4 will be EOL on this generation), which means new RAM (DDR5) and CPU... might as well do the rest of it as well.

Monster Cables!


Only diamond cables for me, thanks. Monster cables are like, so 2003.

...and those HAVE to be replaced, or the digital audio and video degrades after 7 or 8 months of use. I know a lot of my friends and family say they can't see or hear the difference, but they don't have my discriminating audiophile/videophile senses.
 
5 days ago  

Merltech: Are laptops really designed to be upgrade-able?


My Thinkpad T420 has four places I can put an SSD (2.5" bay, mSATA slot, optical slot and cardbus slot)  and a I have a $60 Cardslot to PCIe adapter that lets me use an external GPU as well. That thing is 10 years old but I've plugged in a GTX970 and used it as a full fat video editing rig.

I upgraded the screen on my Thinkpad T470p to a 4k version last year.

It's possible to buy laptops that one can upgrade.
 
5 days ago  
If the upgradeability of your laptop depends entirely on another company then you don't get to advertize it as being upgradeable. I have no problem with suing companies over their idiotic marketing practices.
 
5 days ago  

Merltech: Are laptops really designed to be upgrade-able?


Mostly no, so meeting Dell's claim of unprecedented upgradability would not take much.
 
5 days ago  
I have an Alienware monitor its farking amazing
 
5 days ago  

xanadian: Now, their consumer computers are truly hit-or-miss.  I had an XPS way back in the day and it was nothing but trouble.  So I build my own goddamn computer and haven't had a problem with it for 7 years now.


Thankfully, it's not too hard to buy a Latitude, Optiplex or Precision for personal use.  I got a great deal on a relatively basic Precision laptop for my wife; I'm confident it'll last, and even if it doesn't, prosupport is pretty good.
 
5 days ago  

OhioUGrad: I've had Dell laptops and would not recommend them to anyone. I know everyone has personal choices and experiences with different brands, but fark Dell.

My best experience has been with a Lenovo that has been running like brand new since 2016 (granted I updated to an SSD)

Clients either send me ThinkBooks or Dell Business laptops to use. Have yet to have a problem with any work computers, and have yet to ever be sent an HP.

/cannot find a comparable Lenovo to replace this one when I need to
//Y50-70
///open to suggestions


Dell's consumer-grade Inspiron laptops are shiat.  The business-grade Latitudes are solid.

Lenovo?  Enjoy the government sponsored malware baked into the firmware at the factory.
 
5 days ago  

xanadian: OhioUGrad: I've had Dell laptops and would not recommend them to anyone. I know everyone has personal choices and experiences with different brands, but fark Dell.

My best experience has been with a Lenovo that has been running like brand new since 2016 (granted I updated to an SSD)

Clients either send me ThinkBooks or Dell Business laptops to use. Have yet to have a problem with any work computers, and have yet to ever be sent an HP.

/cannot find a comparable Lenovo to replace this one when I need to
//Y50-70
///open to suggestions

We have Dells here, and once in a while we get a dud but they're otherwise quite reliable.  Though, these are laptops and computers that are offered to businesses and the federal government.

Now, their consumer computers are truly hit-or-miss.  I had an XPS way back in the day and it was nothing but trouble.  So I build my own goddamn computer and haven't had a problem with it for 7 years now.


Did you build a mini or slim tower? I prefer laptops but built a desktop ages ago. It's not difficult or super expensive (depending on graphics cards nowadays) and you can customize it how you want it and upgrade as needed.
 
5 days ago  

Merltech: Are laptops really designed to be upgrade-able?


Maybe RAM and the hard drive if you're lucky.  Other than that, nope
 
5 days ago  

BunkyBrewman: Merltech: Are laptops really designed to be upgrade-able?

Maybe RAM and the hard drive if you're lucky.  Other than that, nope


Yep, I just bought a new laptop recently since my previous one was coming up on 7 years old. Both the old and new though, have/had room for another HDD and another RAM chip.

Of course, it probably voids your warranty if you go in and do that yourself, so you're really better off just having that stuff added when you buy it in the first place.
 
5 days ago  

BunkyBrewman: Merltech: Are laptops really designed to be upgrade-able?

Maybe RAM and the hard drive if you're lucky.  Other than that, nope


Wifi/Bluetooth/Cellular cards are usually modular and upgradeable as well.
 
5 days ago  

Merltech: Are laptops really designed to be upgrade-able?


You have to leave them at an obscure computer repair shop in Delaware.
 
5 days ago  
My work-supplied Dell Precision is pretty nice--a lot more laptop (i9 10855) than I would have bought myself.  I was pretty excited when I read that it could be spec'd with a reasonable graphic cards--I knew that work wouldn't spring for it, but I would be happy to after I got my hands on it...Imagine my disappointment when I found out that there was no vendor-supported graphics upgrade path from the supplied Intel UHD630.
 
5 days ago  

wejash: "Unprecedented" is a useful word.

It could mean it is the first that cannot, in any possible way, be upgraded.

So stop yer biatchin'.


Came for this
 
5 days ago  
Upgradable laptop? 

Hands-On with Framework's Fully Modular Laptop!
Youtube XFrJcjCbCA8
 
4 days ago  

OhioUGrad: I've had Dell laptops and would not recommend them to anyone. I know everyone has personal choices and experiences with different brands, but fark Dell.

My best experience has been with a Lenovo that has been running like brand new since 2016 (granted I updated to an SSD)

Clients either send me ThinkBooks or Dell Business laptops to use. Have yet to have a problem with any work computers, and have yet to ever be sent an HP.

/cannot find a comparable Lenovo to replace this one when I need to
//Y50-70
///open to suggestions


The unending issues I've had with my Dell laptop has made me decide to buy my first Mac. And it's the M1 MacBook Air which all the tech reviewers have been raving about. And it is a great laptop, and quiet!

Yes, learning a new OS is a challenge, but it's not too bad. I have to admit, the 13 inch gold color MacBook Air looks very nice as well.
 
4 days ago  

SecondaryControl: My work-supplied Dell Precision is pretty nice--a lot more laptop (i9 10855) than I would have bought myself.  I was pretty excited when I read that it could be spec'd with a reasonable graphic cards--I knew that work wouldn't spring for it, but I would be happy to after I got my hands on it...Imagine my disappointment when I found out that there was no vendor-supported graphics upgrade path from the supplied Intel UHD630.


Yeah, a *lot* of these are "upgradable" - but only on the factory's assembly line.  LOL.

/they're not helping.
 
4 days ago  

OhioUGrad: xanadian: OhioUGrad: I've had Dell laptops and would not recommend them to anyone. I know everyone has personal choices and experiences with different brands, but fark Dell.

My best experience has been with a Lenovo that has been running like brand new since 2016 (granted I updated to an SSD)

Clients either send me ThinkBooks or Dell Business laptops to use. Have yet to have a problem with any work computers, and have yet to ever be sent an HP.

/cannot find a comparable Lenovo to replace this one when I need to
//Y50-70
///open to suggestions

We have Dells here, and once in a while we get a dud but they're otherwise quite reliable.  Though, these are laptops and computers that are offered to businesses and the federal government.

Now, their consumer computers are truly hit-or-miss.  I had an XPS way back in the day and it was nothing but trouble.  So I build my own goddamn computer and haven't had a problem with it for 7 years now.

Did you build a mini or slim tower? I prefer laptops but built a desktop ages ago. It's not difficult or super expensive (depending on graphics cards nowadays) and you can customize it how you want it and upgrade as needed.


Amen.  I can't even remember when I built my main desktop.  It was sometime between 2004 and 2005.  I did a major overhaul on it in 2007 or 2008 when the motherboard failed.  That was a new power supply, motherboard, CPU, and RAM.  It started on XP, and moved to Win 7 somewhere along the line.

Since then, it's been rock-stable.  Late last year, we moved all the house workstations from Win 7 to Win 10 Pro and added some hardware upgrades while we were at it.  On my box, I doubled the RAM from 8 GB to 16 GB, replaced the platter 500 GB C: drive with a Samsung SSD, pushed the CPU to the fastest I could get for the MB socket (went from an i5 at 2.5 GHz to an i7 at 2.93 GHz), and upgraded the video card to one that could support three monitors simultaneously (2 desktop monitors, and an HDMI feed to the big TV).

With that and Win 10 Pro, I figure it's probably good for another 10 years or so.  I bet I got one of the only Win 10 PCs with a working floppy drive.
 
4 days ago  
Kinda off-topic question to the group at large.

My personal machine(s) always seem to remain really stable and not often in critical need of upgrades.  Many of my friends seem to have boatloads of system crashes and stability problems and always need to be replacing something or other.  My standard joke is that it's because they play games and I don't.

My question is, Is that really a joke?  Is this just coincidence within my own experience, or do high-end computer games *really* destabilize a PC?

Anyone else have similar experiences?
 
4 days ago  

skinink: OhioUGrad: I've had Dell laptops and would not recommend them to anyone. I know everyone has personal choices and experiences with different brands, but fark Dell.

My best experience has been with a Lenovo that has been running like brand new since 2016 (granted I updated to an SSD)

Clients either send me ThinkBooks or Dell Business laptops to use. Have yet to have a problem with any work computers, and have yet to ever be sent an HP.

/cannot find a comparable Lenovo to replace this one when I need to
//Y50-70
///open to suggestions

The unending issues I've had with my Dell laptop has made me decide to buy my first Mac. And it's the M1 MacBook Air which all the tech reviewers have been raving about. And it is a great laptop, and quiet!

Yes, learning a new OS is a challenge, but it's not too bad. I have to admit, the 13 inch gold color MacBook Air looks very nice as well.


No way can I do tiny laptops! Most clients send me the tiny 13-14" because they are easier for people to travel around with, but I just can't. The keyboard is miniature, I like having my numerical keypad, and a larger screen helps when you're doing system testing/screenshots/editing. In fact, for my personal consulting laptop (the Lenovo) I even got a USB monitor for travel.
 
4 days ago  

Russ1642: BunkyBrewman: Merltech: Are laptops really designed to be upgrade-able?

Maybe RAM and the hard drive if you're lucky.  Other than that, nope

Wifi/Bluetooth/Cellular cards are usually modular and upgradeable as well.


OK, fine...

Maybe RAM and the hard drive and Wifi cards if you're lucky.  Other than that, nope.
 
4 days ago  
The suit alleges that Dell should have been aware that Intel and Nvidia's unannounced products wouldn't work with the laptop.

Yeah, fark these people. They're just suing because litigation is the American way. You can upgrade the fark out of a desktop, but if Intel changes the chipset, you can't without buying a new mobo.
 
4 days ago  
Im still running my dell netbook 1012...
Had to replace the screen, and doubled memory..
/Brought in 2009 for under $250.
 
4 days ago  
In 2016 when my wife got a new job and we had to move across the country, I tried to buy a Dell computer so I could continue to work for my employer from afar.

"Tried being the operative word here.

I went to Dell.com and went through the process of what I thought was purchasing a computer, all the way through the payment and shipping info.

And then a day later, I got an email that the order had been canceled on their end. Odd. I tried again, same result

So I went over to Lenovo, bought one of theirs, and have been happy with it ever since. Dell can eat my anus.
 
4 days ago  
Fark user imageView Full Size


Nicholas D. Wolfwood: to an i7 at 2.93 GHz


If (admittedly a big if but the dates are about right) that's an LGA1366 and the CPU was an i7-870, you can upgrade the BIOS to something that could have supported a Core i7-990X, you've got one more upgrade. Get a used Xeon from some datacenter's surplus store from the Fleabay.

The Xeon X56xx chips https://www.cpu-world.com/Sockets/Soc​k​et%201366%20(LGA1366).html roll with with 6 cores, OCs to 4GHz and run cooler (both in TDP and real-world temperature measurements) than the i7 for which they were drop-in replacements.
 
4 days ago  

wejash: "Unprecedented" is a useful word.

It could mean it is the first that cannot, in any possible way, be upgraded.

So stop yer biatchin'.


It does sound like puffery which would make it marketing hype and not fraud but it is an odd term to use.
I am a loyal Dell customer because the parts are pretty replaceable as far as laptops go.
This would seem pretty in line with their other offering if only Intel had not screwed them.
 
4 days ago  

JustLookin: In 2016 when my wife got a new job and we had to move across the country, I tried to buy a Dell computer so I could continue to work for my employer from afar.

"Tried being the operative word here.

I went to Dell.com and went through the process of what I thought was purchasing a computer, all the way through the payment and shipping info.

And then a day later, I got an email that the order had been canceled on their end. Odd. I tried again, same result

So I went over to Lenovo, bought one of theirs, and have been happy with it ever since. Dell can eat my anus.


Well, I bought a Dell from Walmart. It was a pretty simple process, and the Walmart guy didn't yoink the laptop away from me at the last minute.

It's a G5 gaming laptop, I bought for my side gig doing game development... 6 cores intel i7 8750H, 4GB 1050ti... supposedly a display model, so I got it for $500, which was a steal (and it was in perfect condition, contrary to the Walmart guy's horror story about missing keys and not booting). I upgraded RAM to 32GB, storage to 1TB boot, 2TB data, and I dock it here in my home office through the USB-C port to a second monitor.

Honestly, I'd never order through Dell or HP's web sites. For laptops, it's nice to see one in person, at a local box store, Best Buy, or Microcenter (if you are lucky enough to have one of those nearby) - and usually cheaper to buy in person.
 
4 days ago  

OhioUGrad: I've had Dell laptops and would not recommend them to anyone. I know everyone has personal choices and experiences with different brands, but fark Dell.

My best experience has been with a Lenovo that has been running like brand new since 2016 (granted I updated to an SSD)

Clients either send me ThinkBooks or Dell Business laptops to use. Have yet to have a problem with any work computers, and have yet to ever be sent an HP.

/cannot find a comparable Lenovo to replace this one when I need to
//Y50-70
///open to suggestions


Weird, Dell is my first choice.

Especially after upgrading an HP Pavilion laptop, 30 screws to get the back off? And two of them are hidden under the rubber feet? What moron engineered these things?
 
4 days ago  

Twilight Farkle: [Fark user image 280x420]

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: to an i7 at 2.93 GHz

If (admittedly a big if but the dates are about right) that's an LGA1366 and the CPU was an i7-870, you can upgrade the BIOS to something that could have supported a Core i7-990X, you've got one more upgrade. Get a used Xeon from some datacenter's surplus store from the Fleabay.

The Xeon X56xx chips https://www.cpu-world.com/Sockets/Sock​et%201366%20(LGA1366).html roll with with 6 cores, OCs to 4GHz and run cooler (both in TDP and real-world temperature measurements) than the i7 for which they were drop-in replacements.


Here's my Frankenstein:

Fark user imageView Full Size


The motherboard is a Gigabyte H55M-S2H (LGA1156 socket); CPU is an i7-870 @ 2.93 GHz, no overclocking.

RAM is two 8 GB sticks of DDR3-1666.  Video is Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1650.  C: is a Samsung 500 GB SSD, D: is a spinning platter drive.  Got a DVD burner and a Blu-Ray burner.  Cabling is a mess, as you might expect for a machine that 'just growed' the way this one did.

It's a jalopy, but it's solid.
 
4 days ago  

MetaDeth: OhioUGrad: I've had Dell laptops and would not recommend them to anyone. I know everyone has personal choices and experiences with different brands, but fark Dell.

My best experience has been with a Lenovo that has been running like brand new since 2016 (granted I updated to an SSD)

Clients either send me ThinkBooks or Dell Business laptops to use. Have yet to have a problem with any work computers, and have yet to ever be sent an HP.

/cannot find a comparable Lenovo to replace this one when I need to
//Y50-70
///open to suggestions

Weird, Dell is my first choice.

Especially after upgrading an HP Pavilion laptop, 30 screws to get the back off? And two of them are hidden under the rubber feet? What moron engineered these things?


Someone bored at their job that wanted to make themselves feel valuable.

"Hey boss, look how secure this plastic is!"
 
4 days ago  

MetaDeth: OhioUGrad: I've had Dell laptops and would not recommend them to anyone. I know everyone has personal choices and experiences with different brands, but fark Dell.

My best experience has been with a Lenovo that has been running like brand new since 2016 (granted I updated to an SSD)

Clients either send me ThinkBooks or Dell Business laptops to use. Have yet to have a problem with any work computers, and have yet to ever be sent an HP.

/cannot find a comparable Lenovo to replace this one when I need to
//Y50-70
///open to suggestions

Weird, Dell is my first choice.

Especially after upgrading an HP Pavilion laptop, 30 screws to get the back off? And two of them are hidden under the rubber feet? What moron engineered these things?


Dell (and, I suspect, other vendors, but I can't speak to them) is really a Jekyll and Hyde situation.

Their consumer-oriented products have far lower quality and reliability than the corporate-positioned units.  Get an Optiplex desktop or a Latitude laptop, and you have a much better chance of a trouble-free system.

That said, Dell's Optiplex line just *purely* loves to give you "theoretical" expandability.  There's space, drive bays, slots, etc. all right - and a power supply that's *just BARELY* big enough to run the gear the machine ships with, and maybe one watt left over.  The power cables are *just* long enough to reach the installed drives - and there won't be any unused power taps, either.

And I don't know if they're still doing it, but Dell used to get special power supplies made for them with different, non-standard pinouts on the motherboard connector.  Not *drastically* different - they'd only muck with one or two pins - but they did things like change two black wires to three, and reduce something else from three wires to two, so people couldn't simply move wires back to the right spots in the connector shell.  Thanks, guys!

Aftermarket vendors like PC Power and Cooling would list beefier power supplies that were 'Dell Spec', so folks could upgrade.

We were using Optiplex 960s and 980s at work in those days.  Our developers needed something more robust than the 'users only need Office and Lotus Notes' machines the depot was handing out, so the first thing I'd do was add more RAM, a video card that could support two monitors, and a second hard drive.  Of course, that meant I had to replace the power supply, too.

Know anyone who needs a pile of 60 Watt power supplies?
 
3 days ago  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: MetaDeth: OhioUGrad: I've had Dell laptops and would not recommend them to anyone. I know everyone has personal choices and experiences with different brands, but fark Dell.

My best experience has been with a Lenovo that has been running like brand new since 2016 (granted I updated to an SSD)

Clients either send me ThinkBooks or Dell Business laptops to use. Have yet to have a problem with any work computers, and have yet to ever be sent an HP.

/cannot find a comparable Lenovo to replace this one when I need to
//Y50-70
///open to suggestions

Weird, Dell is my first choice.

Especially after upgrading an HP Pavilion laptop, 30 screws to get the back off? And two of them are hidden under the rubber feet? What moron engineered these things?

Dell (and, I suspect, other vendors, but I can't speak to them) is really a Jekyll and Hyde situation.

Their consumer-oriented products have far lower quality and reliability than the corporate-positioned units.  Get an Optiplex desktop or a Latitude laptop, and you have a much better chance of a trouble-free system.

That said, Dell's Optiplex line just *purely* loves to give you "theoretical" expandability.  There's space, drive bays, slots, etc. all right - and a power supply that's *just BARELY* big enough to run the gear the machine ships with, and maybe one watt left over.  The power cables are *just* long enough to reach the installed drives - and there won't be any unused power taps, either.

And I don't know if they're still doing it, but Dell used to get special power supplies made for them with different, non-standard pinouts on the motherboard connector.  Not *drastically* different - they'd only muck with one or two pins - but they did things like change two black wires to three, and reduce something else from three wires to two, so people couldn't simply move wires back to the right spots in the connector shell.  Thanks, guys!

Aftermarket vendors like PC Power and Cooling would list beefier power supplies that ...


True, I only buy their business-grade stuff, currently sporting a Precision 7510. (But writing this on that myriad-of-screws HP laptop) I also have an ancient (dual core Core2) Latitude D830 that still works fine, although it's having a tough time keeping up with modern demands, even with an SSD. (The BIOS update v13 was nice though, took it from max 4GB RAM to 8GB RAM)

I recently put a stock higher-end power supply in an Optiplex 1070. Everything plugged into the Dell board just fine. Although I had to perform surgery and rip out the drive cage to make room for the NVidia 1070 I put in. (Yo dawg, I hear ya like 1070's so I put a 1070 in your 1070...) And the port for the front-USB cable is also right where the GPU goes, so seems like they design them to look upgradable but not really be upgraded much.
 
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