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(Some Guy)   Anyone up for tern omelettes, because here's your chance   (michigansthumb.com) divider line
    More: Sad, Orange County, California, Tern, Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve, California, Southern California, Abandonment, largest-scale abandonment of eggs, significant increase  
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1804 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Jun 2021 at 10:39 PM (2 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



37 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-06-04 6:05:34 PM  
There is a season.
 
2021-06-04 9:09:07 PM  
Things took a tern for the worst.
 
2021-06-04 9:19:07 PM  
You'd think they would retern once the danger had passed.
 
2021-06-04 9:37:22 PM  
Maybe they all got raptored.
 
2021-06-04 10:42:18 PM  
Ain't nobody can eat 3000 eggs.
 
2021-06-04 10:42:51 PM  
The Screwing Of The Tern by James Henry
 
2021-06-04 10:45:35 PM  
puns aside, this is infuriating.

tear him a new cloaca.
 
2021-06-04 10:47:42 PM  
Whose Line - Arctic Tern
Youtube wBzwv057GPs
 
2021-06-04 10:48:38 PM  

Fano: Ain't nobody can eat 3000 eggs.


media3.giphy.comView Full Size
 
2021-06-04 10:49:26 PM  

Fano: Ain't nobody can eat 3000 eggs.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-04 10:50:10 PM  

bughunter: Fano: Ain't nobody can eat 3000 eggs.

[media3.giphy.com image 506x261]


Goddammit.
 
2021-06-04 10:52:06 PM  
ain't nobody can post 50 cool hand luke gifs
 
2021-06-04 10:53:35 PM  
Genuine question for any ornithologists out there, why would all these birds permanently abandon a large active nesting site, and refuse to return, following relatively brief encounters with potential threats?

Like, just from an evolutionary perspective, that strategy seems prone to problems. Would they do this if a hawk flew over instead? Can anyone enlighten me?
 
2021-06-04 10:53:54 PM  
I had to put away my micro-drone, that doesn't have a camera, because of stupid & selfish motherfarkers like this person... I just want to play with my harmless toy, but NOOOO! Nosey motherfarkers have to ruin it for me... just like they ruin my peace when I'm minding my own business, smoking a cigarette half a block away and they just HAVE to biatch about it.

I'm beginning to really dislike "normal" people. They're all about themselves, not at all about just enjoying life.
 
2021-06-04 10:55:22 PM  

zbtop: Genuine question for any ornithologists out there, why would all these birds permanently abandon a large active nesting site, and refuse to return, following relatively brief encounters with potential threats?

Like, just from an evolutionary perspective, that strategy seems prone to problems. Would they do this if a hawk flew over instead? Can anyone enlighten me?


Terns are pro-choice.
 
2021-06-04 10:59:40 PM  
Landmines surrounding the nesting area should discourage people from entering the area.
 
2021-06-04 11:06:35 PM  

Chemlight Battery: zbtop: Genuine question for any ornithologists out there, why would all these birds permanently abandon a large active nesting site, and refuse to return, following relatively brief encounters with potential threats?

Like, just from an evolutionary perspective, that strategy seems prone to problems. Would they do this if a hawk flew over instead? Can anyone enlighten me?

Terns are pro-choice.


And this is California we're talking about. If this was Texas, they'd have to carry them to full tern.
 
2021-06-04 11:10:32 PM  
3,000?
Nah...4 is my tern limit.
 
2021-06-04 11:13:31 PM  
Yet AGAIN,some dumbass person farks up nature because they're farking stupid.
 
2021-06-04 11:14:35 PM  

Chemlight Battery: Chemlight Battery: zbtop: Genuine question for any ornithologists out there, why would all these birds permanently abandon a large active nesting site, and refuse to return, following relatively brief encounters with potential threats?

Like, just from an evolutionary perspective, that strategy seems prone to problems. Would they do this if a hawk flew over instead? Can anyone enlighten me?

Terns are pro-choice.

And this is California we're talking about. If this was Texas, they'd have to carry them to full tern.


https://www.thecut.com/2016/03/woman-​i​n-texas-forced-to-deliver-stillborn-ba​by.html

Or, they have to walk around with a dead body inside them.
 
2021-06-04 11:15:31 PM  

0z79: I had to put away my micro-drone, that doesn't have a camera, because of stupid & selfish motherfarkers like this person... I just want to play with my harmless toy, but NOOOO! Nosey motherfarkers have to ruin it for me... just like they ruin my peace when I'm minding my own business, smoking a cigarette half a block away and they just HAVE to biatch about it.

I'm beginning to really dislike "normal" people. They're all about themselves, not at all about just enjoying life.


"Normal" people are farking dumbasses.  You don't want anything to do with them anyhow.
 
2021-06-04 11:16:15 PM  
When a big storms a brewin' sometimes even birds have to abandon future of the young to survive
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-04 11:30:39 PM  

Mock26: Landmines surrounding the nesting area should discourage people from entering the area.


Your plan is to take out drones with land mines?  How... Unconventional.
 
2021-06-04 11:43:11 PM  

Man with the Red Eyes: Mock26: Landmines surrounding the nesting area should discourage people from entering the area.

Your plan is to take out drones with land mines?  How... Unconventional.


It's huntington beach, idiots gonna idiot. The landmines are a few miles further north at los alamitos naval weapons station.
 
2021-06-05 12:22:17 AM  
I thought that said ten omelets and my answer was yes.
 
2021-06-05 12:40:41 AM  
To everything, there is a season, tern tern tern.
 
2021-06-05 1:21:27 AM  

Mantour: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/wBzwv057​GPs]


Came for this, thank you
 
2021-06-05 1:22:26 AM  

zbtop: Genuine question for any ornithologists out there, why would all these birds permanently abandon a large active nesting site, and refuse to return, following relatively brief encounters with potential threats?

Like, just from an evolutionary perspective, that strategy seems prone to problems. Would they do this if a hawk flew over instead? Can anyone enlighten me?


Hiya zbtop!
In regards to evolution, an individual's lifetime reproductive success is what counts.
The Elegant Tern lives for around 20 years. So, in layman's terms, the evolutionary instincts of these birds is to think, fark it, I'll try again next year. That way, they may lose one clutch of chicks this year, but will go on to produce, say another 10 clutches, in later years. Compare this to a bird with a short life span... they'll try harder to ensure breeding success because they won't get many subsequent chances.
As to whether the Elegant Tern would display a different response to a drone versus one of their natural predators? This makes sense as they didn't co-evolve with drones. With a natural predator, the birds understand safety in numbers, and that yeah, one of us might get plucked off. A drone, however, what the fark is that... are we all doomed? Let's get the fark out of here!
Regardless, this is a very sad state of affairs. It would be nice if human's could stop worrying about all the stupid stuff we've made up, and start thinking about "our nest" for a change!
 
2021-06-05 1:24:06 AM  

bughunter: Fano: Ain't nobody can eat 3000 eggs.

[media3.giphy.com image 506x261]


As a member of a younger generation, I was thinking more this:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-05 1:49:53 AM  
I hear terns nest at Plum Island
 
2021-06-05 2:13:36 AM  

Thinkybird: zbtop: Genuine question for any ornithologists out there, why would all these birds permanently abandon a large active nesting site, and refuse to return, following relatively brief encounters with potential threats?

Like, just from an evolutionary perspective, that strategy seems prone to problems. Would they do this if a hawk flew over instead? Can anyone enlighten me?

Hiya zbtop!
In regards to evolution, an individual's lifetime reproductive success is what counts.
The Elegant Tern lives for around 20 years. So, in layman's terms, the evolutionary instincts of these birds is to think, fark it, I'll try again next year. That way, they may lose one clutch of chicks this year, but will go on to produce, say another 10 clutches, in later years. Compare this to a bird with a short life span... they'll try harder to ensure breeding success because they won't get many subsequent chances.
As to whether the Elegant Tern would display a different response to a drone versus one of their natural predators? This makes sense as they didn't co-evolve with drones. With a natural predator, the birds understand safety in numbers, and that yeah, one of us might get plucked off. A drone, however, what the fark is that... are we all doomed? Let's get the fark out of here!
Regardless, this is a very sad state of affairs. It would be nice if human's could stop worrying about all the stupid stuff we've made up, and start thinking about "our nest" for a change!


Thinkybird: zbtop: Genuine question for any ornithologists out there, why would all these birds permanently abandon a large active nesting site, and refuse to return, following relatively brief encounters with potential threats?

Like, just from an evolutionary perspective, that strategy seems prone to problems. Would they do this if a hawk flew over instead? Can anyone enlighten me?

Hiya zbtop!
In regards to evolution, an individual's lifetime reproductive success is what counts.
The Elegant Tern lives for around 20 years. So, in layman's terms, the evolutionary instincts of these birds is to think, fark it, I'll try again next year. That way, they may lose one clutch of chicks this year, but will go on to produce, say another 10 clutches, in later years. Compare this to a bird with a short life span... they'll try harder to ensure breeding success because they won't get many subsequent chances.
As to whether the Elegant Tern would display a different response to a drone versus one of their natural predators? This makes sense as they didn't co-evolve with drones. With a natural predator, the birds understand safety in numbers, and that yeah, one of us might get plucked off. A drone, however, what the fark is that... are we all doomed? Let's get the fark out of here!
Regardless, this is a very sad state of affairs. It would be nice if human's could stop worrying about all the stupid stuff we've made up, and start thinking about "our nest" for a change!


Oops... humans, not human's. Anyhow ... bird!
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-05 2:31:04 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-05 8:18:56 AM  

Mantour: [YouTube video: Whose Line - Arctic Tern]


Came for this, terning around and leaving satisfied
 
2021-06-05 11:59:42 AM  

Thinkybird: zbtop: Genuine question for any ornithologists out there, why would all these birds permanently abandon a large active nesting site, and refuse to return, following relatively brief encounters with potential threats?

Like, just from an evolutionary perspective, that strategy seems prone to problems. Would they do this if a hawk flew over instead? Can anyone enlighten me?

Hiya zbtop!
In regards to evolution, an individual's lifetime reproductive success is what counts.
The Elegant Tern lives for around 20 years. So, in layman's terms, the evolutionary instincts of these birds is to think, fark it, I'll try again next year. That way, they may lose one clutch of chicks this year, but will go on to produce, say another 10 clutches, in later years. Compare this to a bird with a short life span... they'll try harder to ensure breeding success because they won't get many subsequent chances.
As to whether the Elegant Tern would display a different response to a drone versus one of their natural predators? This makes sense as they didn't co-evolve with drones. With a natural predator, the birds understand safety in numbers, and that yeah, one of us might get plucked off. A drone, however, what the fark is that... are we all doomed? Let's get the fark out of here!
Regardless, this is a very sad state of affairs. It would be nice if human's could stop worrying about all the stupid stuff we've made up, and start thinking about "our nest" for a change!


Much appreciated, thanks!
 
2021-06-05 12:21:23 PM  
early and of tern
 
2021-06-05 2:41:14 PM  

Man with the Red Eyes: Mock26: Landmines surrounding the nesting area should discourage people from entering the area.

Your plan is to take out drones with land mines?  How... Unconventional.


No. My plan is to discourage people and their pets from accessing the tern breeding ground.
 
2021-06-05 11:42:05 PM  

zbtop: Thinkybird: zbtop: Genuine question for any ornithologists out there, why would all these birds permanently abandon a large active nesting site, and refuse to return, following relatively brief encounters with potential threats?

Like, just from an evolutionary perspective, that strategy seems prone to problems. Would they do this if a hawk flew over instead? Can anyone enlighten me?

Hiya zbtop!
In regards to evolution, an individual's lifetime reproductive success is what counts.
The Elegant Tern lives for around 20 years. So, in layman's terms, the evolutionary instincts of these birds is to think, fark it, I'll try again next year. That way, they may lose one clutch of chicks this year, but will go on to produce, say another 10 clutches, in later years. Compare this to a bird with a short life span... they'll try harder to ensure breeding success because they won't get many subsequent chances.
As to whether the Elegant Tern would display a different response to a drone versus one of their natural predators? This makes sense as they didn't co-evolve with drones. With a natural predator, the birds understand safety in numbers, and that yeah, one of us might get plucked off. A drone, however, what the fark is that... are we all doomed? Let's get the fark out of here!
Regardless, this is a very sad state of affairs. It would be nice if human's could stop worrying about all the stupid stuff we've made up, and start thinking about "our nest" for a change!

Much appreciated, thanks!


You're welcome :)
 
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