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(Military.com)   Not sure which is more troubling: a USAF airman wearing an unauthorized extremist patch, or that he's using floppy disks in conjunction with nuke security   (military.com) divider line
    More: Awkward, Flag of the United States, Gadsden flag patch, Gadsden flag, Malmstrom Air Force Base, 341st Missile Wing, Proper wear of the uniform, Navy's woodland-pattern camouflage, U.S. Strategic Command  
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3179 clicks; posted to Politics » on 03 Jun 2021 at 2:09 PM (11 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-06-03 1:36:59 PM  
The meaning of the Gadsden flag, designed by Christopher Gadsden in 1775....

I think the floppies are as old as the flag.
 
2021-06-03 1:39:56 PM  
Kick him out, OTH.
 
2021-06-03 1:45:00 PM  
Subby, stuff like that is intentionally kept behind the cutting edge.  You want reliability and simplicity over every other concern.  You want something so thoroughly patched and debugged it was left alone decades ago.  Make **Crypt0Pu$$yWarrior93** work for that hack; make his ass have to find someone born before the Gulf War to even tell him what the fark system he is looking at, much less figure out how to play merry hob with it.
 
2021-06-03 1:55:15 PM  
Looks like someone is violating the PRP program and should be kicked out.
 
2021-06-03 2:01:22 PM  

phalamir: Subby, stuff like that is intentionally kept behind the cutting edge.  You want reliability and simplicity over every other concern.  You want something so thoroughly patched and debugged it was left alone decades ago.  Make **Crypt0Pu$$yWarrior93** work for that hack; make his ass have to find someone born before the Gulf War to even tell him what the fark system he is looking at, much less figure out how to play merry hob with it.


On the other hand, if they're generating crypto keys with 1960s equipment, how robust are the keys going to be against a modern brute force attack?  Some security measures that used to be considered secure aren't any longer because of the increased processing power available today.

Also: magnets
 
2021-06-03 2:06:07 PM  

eurotrader: Looks like someone is violating the PRP program and should be kicked out.


He's an officer so those rules don't apply. RHIP

/former enlisted
//different rules
 
2021-06-03 2:07:31 PM  
You can't run malware on a floppy. You can store it, but the floppy doesn't have its own CPU to perform active attacks.
 
2021-06-03 2:08:15 PM  

Irving Maimway: eurotrader: Looks like someone is violating the PRP program and should be kicked out.

He's an officer so those rules don't apply. RHIP

/former enlisted
//different rules


He should still be discharged.
 
2021-06-03 2:12:58 PM  
i was expecting worse.
 
2021-06-03 2:13:15 PM  
I wonder if he takes the flag patch off when he cashes his government checks?
 
2021-06-03 2:13:39 PM  
So Subby has questions but one of them isn't asking why Military.com is doing a story on the Air Force?
 
2021-06-03 2:14:00 PM  

dr_blasto: Irving Maimway: eurotrader: Looks like someone is violating the PRP program and should be kicked out.

He's an officer so those rules don't apply. RHIP

/former enlisted
//different rules

He should still be discharged.


But he won't. I've seen this kind of thing many times.
 
2021-06-03 2:15:34 PM  

little big man: phalamir: Subby, stuff like that is intentionally kept behind the cutting edge.  You want reliability and simplicity over every other concern.  You want something so thoroughly patched and debugged it was left alone decades ago.  Make **Crypt0Pu$$yWarrior93** work for that hack; make his ass have to find someone born before the Gulf War to even tell him what the fark system he is looking at, much less figure out how to play merry hob with it.

On the other hand, if they're generating crypto keys with 1960s equipment, how robust are the keys going to be against a modern brute force attack?  Some security measures that used to be considered secure aren't any longer because of the increased processing power available today.

Also: magnets


This can't be stressed enough. Part of the reason we modernize is in order to solve problems. Old technology isn't inherently more stable or reliable.
 
2021-06-03 2:17:32 PM  
I was unable to locate a floppy disk in the picture.

Looks closer to a whole hard drive than a floppy.

Jaz disk?
 
2021-06-03 2:17:56 PM  
a) That doesn't look like a floppy (a 3.5", a 5.25", OR an 8.25") - maybe a Zip disk, but "floppy" refers to one of those older ones, right?

little big man: if they're generating crypto keys with 1960s equipment, how robust are the keys going to be against a modern brute force attack?


2) If you can only attack that one terminal which is not connected to the internet (presumably it'd be a private and physical communication connection between the terminal and whatever launch computer, assuming it's not just one system), and the keyboard for it sits inside some of the most tightly controlled space on Planet Earth, I'd say you're as close to secure as we know of.
 
2021-06-03 2:18:24 PM  
Lotus 1-2-3, was all the rage when I was a boy, it's coming back in style, at a nuclear silo near you. I worked at IBM headquarters in NY, reconciling bank statements.
 
2021-06-03 2:19:28 PM  
What's next? People going to start burning copies of  Metallica's Black Album because of the song "Don't Tread on Me"?

Cut me some slack.
 
2021-06-03 2:20:27 PM  
oh look, a white dude
 
2021-06-03 2:20:43 PM  
You don't want software controlling our nuclear arsenal to be stored on thumb drives. You want proprietary, difficult-to-obtain media, even if it is 30 years old.
 
2021-06-03 2:21:13 PM  
I'm starting a new job soon and I was cleaning out my locker at work and found, among other things, several floppy disks. that was when I realized that I should have quite a looooong time ago.
 
2021-06-03 2:21:15 PM  
He was wearing the patch on his Operation Camouflage Pattern, or OCP, uniform in the photo.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-03 2:22:33 PM  

wiredroach: You don't want software controlling our nuclear arsenal to be stored on thumb drives. You want proprietary, difficult-to-obtain media, even if it is 30 years old.


The old "Security via Obscurity" strategy.
 
2021-06-03 2:22:56 PM  

little big man: On the other hand, if they're generating crypto keys with 1960s equipment, how robust are the keys going to be against a modern brute force attack?  Some security measures that used to be considered secure aren't any longer because of the increased processing power available today.


If the crypto keys in question can only be accessed via ancient, air-gapped hardware, no amount of processing power will make a difference.
 
2021-06-03 2:24:37 PM  
That's not a floppy, looks more like one of these guys


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-06-03 2:24:38 PM  
Bandito King:
This can't be stressed enough. Part of the reason we modernize is in order to solve problems. Old technology isn't inherently more stable or reliable.

Windows ME agrees, nervously.
 
2021-06-03 2:24:56 PM  
Is he going to be like Pinback but with thermonuclear weapons to feed the alien?
 
2021-06-03 2:25:43 PM  
That's not a floppy disk, and knowledge that the AF uses them has been out for a while. I believe the AF has modernized up to CD-ROM now or something like that.
 
2021-06-03 2:26:03 PM  

dennysgod: That's not a floppy, looks more like one of these guys


[Fark user image 850x553]


I like that it notes how many feet are in a cartridge. Measuring your code in feet is normal, right?
 
2021-06-03 2:26:52 PM  
Incoming GOMAR, he's done
 
2021-06-03 2:28:35 PM  

Palined Parenthood: oh look, a white dude


They got a lot of those in the Air Force. And they love their Jeebus in Mess Dress Whites. You gonna tell him He can't wear white?
 
2021-06-03 2:31:47 PM  

little big man: On the other hand, if they're generating crypto keys with 1960s equipment, how robust are the keys going to be against a modern brute force attack?  Some security measures that used to be considered secure aren't any longer because of the increased processing power available today.

Also: magnets


Fun Fact
The on-site launch code for every US missile during most of the cold war was 00000000.  It was even written in the launch procedures.
No amount of computing power can compensate for that level of security.
 
2021-06-03 2:34:49 PM  
That's scary but at least it's not on the uniform of someone in the US military
 
2021-06-03 2:35:19 PM  
Hey Airman, could you provide us some kind of metaphor for the American right's motivations and loaylties

"...wore a Gadsden flag patch in place of the American flag on his uniform..."

thanks, bud, that'll do
 
2021-06-03 2:35:24 PM  
Can't hack it if you can't connect to it

now feed that treason weasel a Big Chicken Dinner
 
2021-06-03 2:38:16 PM  

dr_blasto: Kick him out, OTH.


Show me where in the UCMJ that calls for an OTH for what is really only a uniform violation.

(If I were still in the navy I'd wear the US flag on both sleeves.  The First Naval Jack flag looks too much like the gadsen flag.)
 
2021-06-03 2:38:58 PM  

little big man: phalamir: Subby, stuff like that is intentionally kept behind the cutting edge.  You want reliability and simplicity over every other concern.  You want something so thoroughly patched and debugged it was left alone decades ago.  Make **Crypt0Pu$$yWarrior93** work for that hack; make his ass have to find someone born before the Gulf War to even tell him what the fark system he is looking at, much less figure out how to play merry hob with it.

On the other hand, if they're generating crypto keys with 1960s equipment, how robust are the keys going to be against a modern brute force attack?  Some security measures that used to be considered secure aren't any longer because of the increased processing power available today.

Also: magnets


How much has random changed?  Except that nukes traditionally had (or had for decades and changed recently) codes set at all zeros.  In the 1960s, the gold standard for random was radioactive decay, which the Air Force certainly had access to.  And it hasn't changed.
 
2021-06-03 2:39:40 PM  

little big man: phalamir: Subby, stuff like that is intentionally kept behind the cutting edge.  You want reliability and simplicity over every other concern.  You want something so thoroughly patched and debugged it was left alone decades ago.  Make **Crypt0Pu$$yWarrior93** work for that hack; make his ass have to find someone born before the Gulf War to even tell him what the fark system he is looking at, much less figure out how to play merry hob with it.

On the other hand, if they're generating crypto keys with 1960s equipment, how robust are the keys going to be against a modern brute force attack?  Some security measures that used to be considered secure aren't any longer because of the increased processing power available today.

Also: magnets


People would be stunned how much of the latest and greatest industrial automation (Including optical-grade oscilloscopes) still runs primarily on RS-232 (A tech from the 60's)
 
2021-06-03 2:41:19 PM  
I think I was trying to suggest something about the duality of man, sir.
 
2021-06-03 2:41:52 PM  

little big man: phalamir: Subby, stuff like that is intentionally kept behind the cutting edge.  You want reliability and simplicity over every other concern.  You want something so thoroughly patched and debugged it was left alone decades ago.  Make **Crypt0Pu$$yWarrior93** work for that hack; make his ass have to find someone born before the Gulf War to even tell him what the fark system he is looking at, much less figure out how to play merry hob with it.

On the other hand, if they're generating crypto keys with 1960s equipment, how robust are the keys going to be against a modern brute force attack?  Some security measures that used to be considered secure aren't any longer because of the increased processing power available today.

Also: magnets


Do you think anyone is going to brute force a missile silo from the internet? Really? That's just not how it works. That stuff is all air-gaped....
 
2021-06-03 2:43:00 PM  
gapped.....lol

/gaped too
 
2021-06-03 2:43:45 PM  
I got a tattoo of the Gadsden Flag in honor of Marine Corp history when I was young, then these *uckers came along and ruined it
 
2021-06-03 2:47:07 PM  

AugieDoggyDaddy: dr_blasto: Kick him out, OTH.

Show me where in the UCMJ that calls for an OTH for what is really only a uniform violation.

(If I were still in the navy I'd wear the US flag on both sleeves.  The First Naval Jack flag looks too much like the gadsen flag.)


Well first of all officers aren't subject to an OTH they get dismissed and second probably supporting a white supremest movement. They've been booting many for just racist trolling on the social media. Peacetime military isn't the same as wartime.

But like I said above I think it will just a career ending GOMAR cause he embarrassed the air force and that have more consequences than the patch
 
2021-06-03 2:51:31 PM  

FlippityFlap: little big man: phalamir: Subby, stuff like that is intentionally kept behind the cutting edge.  You want reliability and simplicity over every other concern.  You want something so thoroughly patched and debugged it was left alone decades ago.  Make **Crypt0Pu$$yWarrior93** work for that hack; make his ass have to find someone born before the Gulf War to even tell him what the fark system he is looking at, much less figure out how to play merry hob with it.

On the other hand, if they're generating crypto keys with 1960s equipment, how robust are the keys going to be against a modern brute force attack?  Some security measures that used to be considered secure aren't any longer because of the increased processing power available today.

Also: magnets

Do you think anyone is going to brute force a missile silo from the internet? Really? That's just not how it works. That stuff is all air-gaped....


Natanz was airgapped too.
 
2021-06-03 2:54:04 PM  

Bandito King: little big man: phalamir: Subby, stuff like that is intentionally kept behind the cutting edge.  You want reliability and simplicity over every other concern.  You want something so thoroughly patched and debugged it was left alone decades ago.  Make **Crypt0Pu$$yWarrior93** work for that hack; make his ass have to find someone born before the Gulf War to even tell him what the fark system he is looking at, much less figure out how to play merry hob with it.

On the other hand, if they're generating crypto keys with 1960s equipment, how robust are the keys going to be against a modern brute force attack?  Some security measures that used to be considered secure aren't any longer because of the increased processing power available today.

Also: magnets

This can't be stressed enough. Part of the reason we modernize is in order to solve problems. Old technology isn't inherently more stable or reliable.


Counterpoint:  You can try to generate all the crypto keys you want, if you don't have physical access to the machine to attempt your attack (because it's not connected to any network, hence the floppies), it's not going to do you any good.

These systems are built with layer upon layer of security, just making a bunch of crypto hashes and playing dial-a-silo ala WarGames isn't going to work.
 
2021-06-03 2:55:15 PM  
Military.com called an Air Force captain an "Airman". Is it proper nomenclature to reference someone of the officer ranks with a title generally reserved for the enlisted ranks?

If I were passing an Army officer and tossed a salute with "Morning soldier", I suspect I might find myself in the front-lean and rest position for quite some time.
 
2021-06-03 2:56:53 PM  

CthulhuCalling: FlippityFlap: little big man: phalamir: Subby, stuff like that is intentionally kept behind the cutting edge.  You want reliability and simplicity over every other concern.  You want something so thoroughly patched and debugged it was left alone decades ago.  Make **Crypt0Pu$$yWarrior93** work for that hack; make his ass have to find someone born before the Gulf War to even tell him what the fark system he is looking at, much less figure out how to play merry hob with it.

On the other hand, if they're generating crypto keys with 1960s equipment, how robust are the keys going to be against a modern brute force attack?  Some security measures that used to be considered secure aren't any longer because of the increased processing power available today.

Also: magnets

Do you think anyone is going to brute force a missile silo from the internet? Really? That's just not how it works. That stuff is all air-gaped....

Natanz was airgapped too.


True, however Natanz was still using relatively modern equipment, hence the attack vector for malware to jump.  It's easy to make malware that gets transferred to a USB stick when you know the target hardware has USB ports, they get actively used, and the administrators aren't able/willing to shut them down.  Good luck trying to get a piece of malware to jump onto one of those floppy disks.
 
2021-06-03 3:00:16 PM  
 
2021-06-03 3:01:44 PM  

A Cave Geek: little big man: phalamir: Subby, stuff like that is intentionally kept behind the cutting edge.  You want reliability and simplicity over every other concern.  You want something so thoroughly patched and debugged it was left alone decades ago.  Make **Crypt0Pu$$yWarrior93** work for that hack; make his ass have to find someone born before the Gulf War to even tell him what the fark system he is looking at, much less figure out how to play merry hob with it.

On the other hand, if they're generating crypto keys with 1960s equipment, how robust are the keys going to be against a modern brute force attack?  Some security measures that used to be considered secure aren't any longer because of the increased processing power available today.

Also: magnets

People would be stunned how much of the latest and greatest industrial automation (Including optical-grade oscilloscopes) still runs primarily on RS-232 (A tech from the 60's)


For the _most_ part, while basically all test equipment worth a fart has RS232 and GPIB/SCPI (or at least has them as options/plugins), the majority of it - for a fair number of years now - has also supported USB.

And increasingly, it's not standalone instruments, it's frontends with a USB that lets your computer drive it because that replaces the cost of buttons and screens on the instrument with the USB interface it has anyway.
 
2021-06-03 3:04:28 PM  

Comic Book Guy: CthulhuCalling: FlippityFlap: little big man: phalamir: Subby, stuff like that is intentionally kept behind the cutting edge.  You want reliability and simplicity over every other concern.  You want something so thoroughly patched and debugged it was left alone decades ago.  Make **Crypt0Pu$$yWarrior93** work for that hack; make his ass have to find someone born before the Gulf War to even tell him what the fark system he is looking at, much less figure out how to play merry hob with it.

On the other hand, if they're generating crypto keys with 1960s equipment, how robust are the keys going to be against a modern brute force attack?  Some security measures that used to be considered secure aren't any longer because of the increased processing power available today.

Also: magnets

Do you think anyone is going to brute force a missile silo from the internet? Really? That's just not how it works. That stuff is all air-gaped....

Natanz was airgapped too.

True, however Natanz was still using relatively modern equipment, hence the attack vector for malware to jump.  It's easy to make malware that gets transferred to a USB stick when you know the target hardware has USB ports, they get actively used, and the administrators aren't able/willing to shut them down.  Good luck trying to get a piece of malware to jump onto one of those floppy disks.


Thank you. That was my point...
 
2021-06-03 3:08:06 PM  
Bandito King: little big man: phalamir: Subby, stuff like that is intentionally kept behind the cutting edge.  You want reliability and simplicity over every other concern.  You want something so thoroughly patched and debugged it was left alone decades ago.  Make **Crypt0Pu$$yWarrior93** work for that hack; make his ass have to find someone born before the Gulf War to even tell him what the fark system he is looking at, much less figure out how to play merry hob with it.

On the other hand, if they're generating crypto keys with 1960s equipment, how robust are the keys going to be against a modern brute force attack?  Some security measures that used to be considered secure aren't any longer because of the increased processing power available today.

Also: magnets

This can't be stressed enough. Part of the reason we modernize is in order to solve problems. Old technology isn't inherently more stable or reliable.

Admiral Adama frowns on your position.
 
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