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(YouTube)   Screw using that exercise ball for actual exercise. Let's do something much more beneficial with it, like making a homemade pizza oven   (youtube.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy  
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489 clicks; posted to STEM » on 11 May 2021 at 9:36 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-05-11 7:40:17 PM  
I've seen several others like this that used vermiculite and portland cement, and wondered how long they'd last without using refractory cement stone bases and linings.

Based on what YT tells me, there are people who made them just like this 3-4 years ago and they've survived regular use without any issues, as long as you give them plenty of time to properly cure.

Seems like a decent way to go vs spending thousands on a kit.
 
2021-05-11 7:49:23 PM  
Get an Ooni for a few hundred bucks. No miss no fuss. Take it with you when you move.
 
2021-05-11 8:33:14 PM  
I watched the video and my first thought was why? Why repeat the same very basic mistakes as a lot of the videos on the same subject on youtube?

The basic mistakes
He used the wrong type of cement. Cement and it's products are high tek. Use a type that is heat tolerant.

He used no aggregate. Perlite doesn't count. It's very easy to crush. Aggregate gives you strength. Lava rock works much better and comes in different sizes. It also is heat resistant. and retains heat much better.

He used no type of reinforcement wire (rebar). Really?

His mix was a bit dry (better than a bit wet). Perlite will make the problem worse because it absorbs water.

He probably let it dry to quickly.
Cover it and wait 3 hours and then sprinkle with water just before  the point of runoff and then cover. Do it again in 12 hours, cover and wait several days. Then uncover and let it dry slowly. The slower the cure, the stronger the product.

To much heat to fast.
Let your new oven sit, the longer the better. Then build a very small fire spread evenly in it to drive out any remaining water. Then slowly increase the heat. (same concept as seasoning cast iron or a wok).

Now that your beastie is good to go and ready to use, bring it up to temp slowly to prevent thermal shock.
Start about an hour before you want to stick something in it.

A word about shape.
Spheres are great for containing pressure but that is not what this is about. Most "pizza" ovens are slightly domed. The idea being that the floor is slightly lower in temp than the dome.

What he got right.
He went for it!  Even if it cracks, he has a working, perfectly usable oven for all kinds of tasty things.
Bragging rights done tastefully. Don't want to come off as a douche.


I have built eight wood fired ovens before (before Youtube) and as far as I know they are all still working.

The funny thing is that I don't have a pizza oven at home.
And I don't want one.

GO FOR IT.
 
2021-05-11 8:54:26 PM  

markie_farkie: I've seen several others like this that used vermiculite and portland cement,

...

Given the either or choice, perlite is the way to go.

"how long they'd last without using refractory cement stone bases and linings."
Turn the top over and use a refractory mortar (Sakrete)  to the line inside. Or use a clay slurry.
 
2021-05-11 9:42:10 PM  

IgG4: Get an Ooni for a few hundred bucks. No miss no fuss. Take it with you when you move.


I have a pellet Ooni and it kind of sucks. I can 100% see how the gas/charcoal ones would probably work just fine though. The gravity feed flat out doesn't work.
 
2021-05-11 10:11:13 PM  

blender61: "how long they'd last without using refractory cement stone bases and linings."
Turn the top over and use a refractory mortar (Sakrete)  to the line inside. Or use a clay slurry.


I built a portland concrete firebox for grilling and after several years and many cords of wood it's suffered no degradation at all. And from my experience with the fires I've had in it you must need to get it really hot to start having problems; wood and natural aspiration is just not going to be enough.
 
2021-05-11 11:50:29 PM  
Don't most people have sex on them?

/or are those documentaries I've seen online misleading?
 
2021-05-12 1:00:48 AM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: Don't most people have sex on them?

/or are those documentaries I've seen online misleading?


The high temperatures and rough cement tend to dissuade people from doing that.

/Watch out for burning sensations...
 
2021-05-12 9:29:24 AM  

UTD_Elcid: Pants full of macaroni!!: Don't most people have sex on them?

/or are those documentaries I've seen online misleading?

The high temperatures and rough cement tend to dissuade people from doing that.

/Watch out for burning sensations...


I think he was referring to the exercise ball...but I'm not here to judge.
 
2021-05-12 4:10:34 PM  
That's creative but using subby's mothers @ss will double the size of the oven
 
2021-05-12 6:18:54 PM  

drewogatory: IgG4: Get an Ooni for a few hundred bucks. No miss no fuss. Take it with you when you move.

I have a pellet Ooni and it kind of sucks. I can 100% see how the gas/charcoal ones would probably work just fine though. The gravity feed flat out doesn't work.


I have the Ooni pro. Mostly run charcoal or actual wood or a mix. Works great! I have thought about getting the gas attachment to cut down on fire tending needs, but I have found if you add a bit of fuel after each pizza you can maintain temp pretty well once you get it hot.

The dough is what took the most work for me, but I have it down now.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-05-12 6:44:50 PM  

IgG4: drewogatory: IgG4: Get an Ooni for a few hundred bucks. No miss no fuss. Take it with you when you move.

I have a pellet Ooni and it kind of sucks. I can 100% see how the gas/charcoal ones would probably work just fine though. The gravity feed flat out doesn't work.

I have the Ooni pro. Mostly run charcoal or actual wood or a mix. Works great! I have thought about getting the gas attachment to cut down on fire tending needs, but I have found if you add a bit of fuel after each pizza you can maintain temp pretty well once you get it hot.

The dough is what took the most work for me, but I have it down now.

[Fark user image 850x637]


I bought the pellet one because I always have pellets. With some improvements I can probably make it better. For now I just use the Kamado.
 
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