Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(CBS 21 Harrisburg)   How connecting to your car tells it more about you, unless your car is also your mother that is   (local21news.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, car  
•       •       •

580 clicks; posted to STEM » on 10 May 2021 at 3:50 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



24 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
TWX
2021-05-10 12:12:44 AM  
That only works if you drive a '28 Porter.
 
2021-05-10 1:00:05 AM  
media-amazon.comView Full Size
 
2021-05-10 3:26:13 AM  
My Mother The Car - 1x25 Over The Hill To The Junkyard
Youtube 4XT0Bcjysw4
 
2021-05-10 4:28:17 AM  
Last time I rented a car I think it was in the contract - something about them not being liable for info copied over if I connected to the system. I didn't connect to the system.

I'm going to buy a new car this summer - I wonder what I'll need to know/do to make sure it isn't phoning home and other stupid stuff like that.
 
2021-05-10 5:54:09 AM  

stoolpigeon: Last time I rented a car I think it was in the contract - something about them not being liable for info copied over if I connected to the system. I didn't connect to the system.

I'm going to buy a new car this summer - I wonder what I'll need to know/do to make sure it isn't phoning home and other stupid stuff like that.


Dont use bluetooth
 
2021-05-10 7:26:42 AM  
I've got too much else to be paranoid about to worry about what my car knows about me.

The cell phone they're talking about having give info to your car is already sending it directly to the Lizard People Headquarters where it's being used to track your movements and spending habits and to plan menus.
 
2021-05-10 7:36:08 AM  
FTA:  "They can trace where you were, how long you stayed there, how fast you were driving, whether you were breaking," says personal injury lawyer Scott Cooper with Schmidt Kramer.

Breaking what?
 
2021-05-10 7:47:19 AM  

offacue: FTA:  "They can trace where you were, how long you stayed there, how fast you were driving, whether you were breaking," says personal injury lawyer Scott Cooper with Schmidt Kramer.

Breaking what?


upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size
 
2021-05-10 8:07:09 AM  
The last car I rented had like 25 different cell phones in the Bluetooth memory. The only reason I saw it was the car wanted to connect to my Bluetooth (hard pass). But the messages were so annoying that I disconnected all the phones from that system and then disabled the auto connect "feature."
 
2021-05-10 8:36:42 AM  
I'm good.  My car doesn't know Morse code.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-05-10 9:04:03 AM  

dittybopper: I'm good.  My car doesn't know Morse code.

[Fark user image 850x477]


Or passengers
 
2021-05-10 9:06:01 AM  
OMG my car could start tracking ... all the things my phone is already tracking!!!!!11!!!

The joy of data tracking: no one gives a flying shiat what the individual average joe does. It's all about agregate data. How many cars going how fast on a highway. Foot traffic past or inside stores.

The only time the individual info is worthwhile for another person to look at is when it drastically deviates from the norm.

Still, you don't want to connect your tracking device to a mobility device, that is your choice. But stop biatching when the GPS traffic report is wrong
 
2021-05-10 9:06:54 AM  

lifeslammer: stoolpigeon: Last time I rented a car I think it was in the contract - something about them not being liable for info copied over if I connected to the system. I didn't connect to the system.

I'm going to buy a new car this summer - I wonder what I'll need to know/do to make sure it isn't phoning home and other stupid stuff like that.

Dont use bluetooth


Or plug directly into any USB ports
 
2021-05-10 9:17:21 AM  

stoolpigeon: Last time I rented a car I think it was in the contract - something about them not being liable for info copied over if I connected to the system. I didn't connect to the system.

I'm going to buy a new car this summer - I wonder what I'll need to know/do to make sure it isn't phoning home and other stupid stuff like that.


Nearly impossible these days. They all seem to have a 4G modem and love to send data back to the mother ship.
 
2021-05-10 10:04:20 AM  

Yaw String: dittybopper: I'm good.  My car doesn't know Morse code.

[Fark user image 850x477]

Or passengers


That's a feature, not a bug.
 
2021-05-10 10:25:42 AM  
If I connected to my car I'm pretty sure I'd hear "Kill me. Please just let me die."
 
2021-05-10 10:27:01 AM  

dittybopper: Yaw String: dittybopper: I'm good.  My car doesn't know Morse code.

[Fark user image 850x477]

Or passengers

That's a feature, not a bug.


Also, that's a straight key, not a bug.
 
2021-05-10 10:38:19 AM  

dittybopper: dittybopper: Yaw String: dittybopper: I'm good.  My car doesn't know Morse code.

[Fark user image 850x477]

Or passengers

That's a feature, not a bug.

Also, that's a straight key, not a bug.


You do realize you're sending information in essentially digital format, right? Your car could easily be programmed to read it and may already have been.
 
2021-05-10 11:37:58 AM  

MrBallou: dittybopper: dittybopper: Yaw String: dittybopper: I'm good.  My car doesn't know Morse code.

[Fark user image 850x477]

Or passengers

That's a feature, not a bug.

Also, that's a straight key, not a bug.

You do realize you're sending information in essentially digital format, right? Your car could easily be programmed to read it and may already have been.


You do realize that it's a Hyundai Accent, right?

Doesn't even have Bluetooth.  You want to play something from your phone (like my 17 year old son does), you have to plug a physical USB cord into it.

Plus I'm pretty sure even the top-of-the-line Hyundai's, and even the Genesis brand, don't have built-in HF receivers, which they'd need to be able to read what I was sending.
 
2021-05-10 12:10:39 PM  

dittybopper: MrBallou: dittybopper: dittybopper: Yaw String: dittybopper: I'm good.  My car doesn't know Morse code.

[Fark user image 850x477]

Or passengers

That's a feature, not a bug.

Also, that's a straight key, not a bug.

You do realize you're sending information in essentially digital format, right? Your car could easily be programmed to read it and may already have been.

You do realize that it's a Hyundai Accent, right?

Doesn't even have Bluetooth.  You want to play something from your phone (like my 17 year old son does), you have to plug a physical USB cord into it.

Plus I'm pretty sure even the top-of-the-line Hyundai's, and even the Genesis brand, don't have built-in HF receivers, which they'd need to be able to read what I was sending.


That's what they want you to think. ;)
 
2021-05-10 12:35:03 PM  
I knew my car would be tracking me before I bought it. They came right out and said so.
 
2021-05-10 12:41:54 PM  

dittybopper: dittybopper: Yaw String: dittybopper: I'm good.  My car doesn't know Morse code.

[Fark user image 850x477]

Or passengers

That's a feature, not a bug.

Also, that's a straight key, not a bug.


otb.cachefly.netView Full Size
 
2021-05-10 1:17:30 PM  

MrBallou: dittybopper: MrBallou: dittybopper: dittybopper: Yaw String: dittybopper: I'm good.  My car doesn't know Morse code.

[Fark user image 850x477]

Or passengers

That's a feature, not a bug.

Also, that's a straight key, not a bug.

You do realize you're sending information in essentially digital format, right? Your car could easily be programmed to read it and may already have been.

You do realize that it's a Hyundai Accent, right?

Doesn't even have Bluetooth.  You want to play something from your phone (like my 17 year old son does), you have to plug a physical USB cord into it.

Plus I'm pretty sure even the top-of-the-line Hyundai's, and even the Genesis brand, don't have built-in HF receivers, which they'd need to be able to read what I was sending.

That's what they want you to think. ;)


Heh.

But while I was being silly, and you were playing along, when I went out for my second daily hump around campus*, I actually gave it some thought.

Now, I've been copying Morse code for a long time now, 36 years to be precise, and for the first 4 years I did it professionally for the US Army.   Since then, it's been an avid hobby.

Automatic copy of Morse was one of the "holy grails" of intelligence collection back in the 1960's through the 1980's at least:

(C) As for HF receivers, the R-390 was out, and the Racal 6790 digital receiver was in.
Automated signals acquisition equipment would be integrated into the collection systems.
Everything would be mo4ernized based on microprocessor technology - mission
management, special identification techniques, signal recording, processing and
reporting. As for Morse collection, NSA continued to pursue the "holy grail" of an automatic
Morse translator, without much success.


https://www.nsa.gov/Portals/70/docume​n​ts/news-features/declassified-document​s/cryptologic-histories/cold_war_iii.p​df

Why have some PFC or SPC sitting on rack when a machine can do it?   The problem was that it just never was good enough, nowhere near as good as a trained human interceptor, even on fairly regular signals.

Today, you can get free software that will copy someone with a good "fist" pretty reliably.  One good piece of free software that will do that (along with myriad other digital modes) is called Fldigi.  I can always tell when someone is using a computer, and probably about 10% or so of the contacts I make are someone using software instead of "wetware" to copy.

I know that machines can easily copy my fist also because I see myself spotted on places like dxmaps.com.   There are hams that set software defined receivers to capture things like digital modes including Morse and report their callsigns and their frequency over the internet.  This is great if you're looking for rare "DX".

Anyway, it wouldn't be all that difficult for me to intentionally vary what I was sending, by speeding up, slowing down, drawing out my dahs, etc. to completely befuddle any software attempting to copy me, while a good operator would be able to understand what I was sending perfectly well.   This is part of the reason why the military still trains a relative handful of Morse interceptors every year, even to this very day.

Just so you know, if we're ever invaded by aliens in city-sized spaceships, me and my key are standing by, ready to help!


*I carry a MOLLE pack filled with about 50 lbs worth of camping and radio gear as exercise.  That and cutting out most carbs has helped me lose about 45 lbs since December.
 
2021-05-10 3:41:55 PM  

dittybopper: MrBallou: dittybopper: MrBallou: dittybopper: dittybopper: Yaw String: dittybopper: I'm good.  My car doesn't know Morse code.

[Fark user image 850x477]

Or passengers

That's a feature, not a bug.

Also, that's a straight key, not a bug.

You do realize you're sending information in essentially digital format, right? Your car could easily be programmed to read it and may already have been.

You do realize that it's a Hyundai Accent, right?

Doesn't even have Bluetooth.  You want to play something from your phone (like my 17 year old son does), you have to plug a physical USB cord into it.

Plus I'm pretty sure even the top-of-the-line Hyundai's, and even the Genesis brand, don't have built-in HF receivers, which they'd need to be able to read what I was sending.

That's what they want you to think. ;)

Heh.

But while I was being silly, and you were playing along, when I went out for my second daily hump around campus*, I actually gave it some thought.

Now, I've been copying Morse code for a long time now, 36 years to be precise, and for the first 4 years I did it professionally for the US Army.   Since then, it's been an avid hobby.

Automatic copy of Morse was one of the "holy grails" of intelligence collection back in the 1960's through the 1980's at least:

(C) As for HF receivers, the R-390 was out, and the Racal 6790 digital receiver was in.
Automated signals acquisition equipment would be integrated into the collection systems.
Everything would be mo4ernized based on microprocessor technology - mission
management, special identification techniques, signal recording, processing and
reporting. As for Morse collection, NSA continued to pursue the "holy grail" of an automatic
Morse translator, without much success.

https://www.nsa.gov/Portals/70/documen​ts/news-features/declassified-document​s/cryptologic-histories/cold_war_iii.p​df

Why have some PFC or SPC sitting on rack when a machine can do it?   The problem was that it just never was good enough, nowhe ...


This firmly identifies you as a nerd, my friend.

+1 for "wetware".
 
Displayed 24 of 24 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.