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(CNN)   Wasps are the new bees   (edition.cnn.com) divider line
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1151 clicks; posted to STEM » on 09 May 2021 at 9:17 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-05-09 5:06:47 PM  
I made a deal with the little devils. I worked HVAC for many years and almost every A/C on a rooftop had a paper wasp nest inside the control compartment here in Georgia. My deal was I don't kill you little farkers if you guys don't sting me. It worked and repairing hundreds of rooftop units I never got stung once. Sure they would threaten me many times by flying around my head and hands but I never got stung. One time I had to move a large nest of maybe 50 of the cute little guys and They got me pretty good but that was before we signed the deal.
 
2021-05-09 5:09:40 PM  
When wasps make honey we'll talk
 
2021-05-09 5:41:58 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-05-09 6:29:36 PM  
FTA: "Insects eating other insects contribute an estimated $417 billion to the world's economy each year, the study said."

So now we are assigning dollar amounts to nothing involving human interaction?

What about rocks that keep tigers away?
 
2021-05-09 8:04:18 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: When wasps make honey we'll talk


Wasps pollinate our food crops. They are also one of the only the only insects that pollinate orchids.
The orchids release a pheromone that tricks the stupid wasps into thinking it is mating with a female wasp. The resulting offspring looks very much like another wasp so he lives happy ever after in the new family setting... https://www.australiangeographic.com.​a​u/topics/science-environment/2014/09/d​eceptive-orchids-luring-wasps-for-poll​ination/
 
2021-05-09 8:26:54 PM  
Nice try, wasp-writing-like-Jen-Rose-Smith.
 
2021-05-09 8:30:28 PM  
I love my wasps
 
2021-05-09 9:22:21 PM  

ruudbob: MaudlinMutantMollusk: When wasps make honey we'll talk

Wasps pollinate our food crops. They are also one of the only the only insects that pollinate orchids.
The orchids release a pheromone that tricks the stupid wasps into thinking it is mating with a female wasp. The resulting offspring looks very much like another wasp so he lives happy ever after in the new family setting... https://www.australiangeographic.com.a​u/topics/science-environment/2014/09/d​eceptive-orchids-luring-wasps-for-poll​ination/


Big fig pollinators (and occasional permanent residents)
 
2021-05-09 9:28:33 PM  

ruudbob: MaudlinMutantMollusk: When wasps make honey we'll talk

Wasps pollinate our food crops. They are also one of the only the only insects that pollinate orchids.
The orchids release a pheromone that tricks the stupid wasps into thinking it is mating with a female wasp. The resulting offspring looks very much like another wasp so he lives happy ever after in the new family setting... https://www.australiangeographic.com.a​u/topics/science-environment/2014/09/d​eceptive-orchids-luring-wasps-for-poll​ination/


Orchids: Nature's Real Dolls.
 
2021-05-09 9:37:12 PM  

Nadie_AZ: FTA: "Insects eating other insects contribute an estimated $417 billion to the world's economy each year, the study said."

So now we are assigning dollar amounts to nothing involving human interaction?

What about rocks that keep tigers away?


Most wasps are either predators of or parasitic of pest insects. So yes, just like you can assign a dollar value to natural pollinators activity, you can assign a value to the natural activities of insects that control pests.

Basically that's crops not lost or insecticide not used.

If you have a garden that is attracting pest insects, there's probably another type of plant you can plant along side them to attract these parasitic wasps.
 
2021-05-09 9:37:38 PM  
I spotted a large mosquito trying to fly through my wall, called it a dumb mother farker, and chased it around the house for 5 minutes.  Guess he showed me.  And it's probably a crane fly.  Then I posted in a wasp/bee thread.

Not perfect, is what I'm saying.
 
2021-05-09 9:41:33 PM  
Fark user image

No. Next?
 
2021-05-09 10:10:12 PM  
Hmm.
 
2021-05-09 10:15:41 PM  
I love my wasps and let the paper wasps set up shop in a few places to keep the aphid population down.

They are chill farkers.
 
2021-05-09 11:10:45 PM  
Fark that. Wasps are territorial flying assholes with sharp stingers and hate everything that isn't a wasp. They obsessively build nests right next to my patio door, in and around my grill, under my deck benches, and just about anywhere else within easy stinging range of humans.

Fark user imageView Full Size

These guys, on the other hand, are respectful of others and know how to mind their own damn business. They fly in, pollinate flowers, make soothing buzzing sounds, and then they fly away peacefully. These guys I like.
 
2021-05-09 11:12:16 PM  
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2021-05-09 11:19:27 PM  
homemaking.comView Full Size
 
2021-05-10 12:06:28 AM  
Mason bees are pretty awesome.
They're solitary insects and rarely sting. Plus they'll pollinate the heck out of your garden.
I don't mind wasps.
 
2021-05-10 12:19:45 AM  
I am the reluctant king of the wasps. My genius friends hosted a barbecue at the end of summer and served sugary punch, right next to a school whose mascot is the yellow jacket. For whatever reason, the bastards liked me the most, and I'd often have three of them crawling on my lips and face by the end when I was sick of trying to shoo them away without pissing the off. Later some built a nest next to my dorm and over sixty made their way into my room over a month or two (including the queen, I think). Didn't even get stung once

//being drunk helped me chill out, I suppose
 
2021-05-10 1:52:24 AM  
Predators of pollinators? No thank you. We don't have time for that nonsense.

The wasps who go after tarantulas can stay.

The wasps that eat bees we have to ...limit. If we can teach them to eat mosquitoes or those weird invasive wiggly worms, then they can be allowed to flourish.
 
2021-05-10 6:28:50 AM  
If insects had to introduce themselves.
Youtube 08kMdn8L7Yw
 
2021-05-10 7:03:01 AM  
Wasps are fantastic. Up there with spiders and mantises in keeping vegetable garden pests down.

Actually ants are pretty cool for that, too, aside from their goddamn aphid farming.

However unfortunately all the wasps around here must die because they're introduced species that are destroying our native bush wildlife.

The native wasps you don't really see around the city.
 
2021-05-10 7:31:44 AM  
Picture of article author:

Fark user imageView Full Size


/screw wasps
 
2021-05-10 8:07:00 AM  

blodyholy: Picture of article author

s:

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size


/nice sweater

FTFY
 
2021-05-10 8:21:45 AM  
Nadie_AZ: FTA: "Insects eating other insects contribute an estimated $417 billion to the world's economy each year, the study said."

So now we are assigning dollar amounts to nothing involving human interaction?

What about rocks that keep tigers away?

Hey look, we found the Monsanto executive!
 
2021-05-10 9:00:06 AM  

dennysgod: [homemaking.com image 850x446]


This chart made my day.

/Yoink!
 
2021-05-10 9:38:15 AM  

dyhchong: Wasps are fantastic. Up there with spiders and mantises in keeping vegetable garden pests down.


Misread as "manatees" first time, which is an odd mental image.
 
2021-05-10 10:55:07 AM  
Samurai Wasp: cool name, kills stinkbugs.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-05-10 12:14:29 PM  
What about the best bees ever?
Boo bees.
 
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