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(Some Guy)   The 400 gigabit Ethernet upgrade cycle has begun. Good luck getting your ISP to sell it to you, though   (nextplatform.com) divider line
    More: Giggity, The Quarter at Tropicana, Router, sec Ethernet, Arista Networks, Shopping malls in New Jersey, Cloud computing, Atlantic City, New Jersey, sec switching  
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1308 clicks; posted to STEM » on 09 May 2021 at 7:30 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2021-05-09 7:22:24 AM  
I remember when the campus backbone upgraded from a 10 Mbps token ring to 100 Mbps FDDI.

The article is about ISP internal equipment. Nothing there for a home user. You'd have to have a LAN party with hundreds of gamers to make that switch breathe hard.
 
2021-05-09 8:10:12 AM  
No unless your house is a backbone provider to the internet.  Which would be cool.
 
2021-05-09 8:12:15 AM  

ZAZ: I remember when the campus backbone upgraded from a 10 Mbps token ring to 100 Mbps FDDI.

The article is about ISP internal equipment. Nothing there for a home user. You'd have to have a LAN party with hundreds of gamers to make that switch breathe hard.


Yeah we're already very close to where any top end (meaning the people who have gigabit or better) at-home speed increases are going to be masturbatory like 8k TVs.

The bigger challenge is getting gigabit speeds to everyone who wants it. Because it's not profitable for the corporate ISPs.
 
2021-05-09 8:19:46 AM  
For someone looking for an inexpensive way to up their home LAN game, Infiniband hardware dirt cheap on ebay. The only costly thing about it is the media. But you can get 40Gbps HBAs for $50 and a switch for $100 or so. IP networking works he same over Infiniband as it does over Ethernet, so it's not a big deal to put in place.
 
2021-05-09 8:41:06 AM  

Boudyro: ZAZ: I remember when the campus backbone upgraded from a 10 Mbps token ring to 100 Mbps FDDI.

The article is about ISP internal equipment. Nothing there for a home user. You'd have to have a LAN party with hundreds of gamers to make that switch breathe hard.

Yeah we're already very close to where any top end (meaning the people who have gigabit or better) at-home speed increases are going to be masturbatory like 8k TVs.

The bigger challenge is getting gigabit speeds to everyone who wants it. Because it's not profitable for the corporate ISPs.


I remember when 2400bps was considered 'high speed'.
 
2021-05-09 9:01:25 AM  

Day_Old_Dutchie: Boudyro: ZAZ: I remember when the campus backbone upgraded from a 10 Mbps token ring to 100 Mbps FDDI.

The article is about ISP internal equipment. Nothing there for a home user. You'd have to have a LAN party with hundreds of gamers to make that switch breathe hard.

Yeah we're already very close to where any top end (meaning the people who have gigabit or better) at-home speed increases are going to be masturbatory like 8k TVs.

The bigger challenge is getting gigabit speeds to everyone who wants it. Because it's not profitable for the corporate ISPs.

I remember when 2400bps was considered 'high speed'.


I just put seed down, get off my lawn.
 
2021-05-09 9:43:48 AM  
Meanwhile where I live in shiatty rural America I'm lucky to have 3 mbps.
 
2021-05-09 10:06:12 AM  
external-content.duckduckgo.comView Full Size
 
2021-05-09 10:09:54 AM  
Spectrum basically forced me to upgrade from a 100MPS home network to GPS ethernet.

a year ago, I had 50MB/sec service, but because they were ending their contract with Earthlink (inherited from Time Warner), I had the option to become 'offical' spectrum customer and get 100MB/s.  They would have just kept giving me 50GB, but my Eartthink emails and usenet servers would be gone anyway.  They weren't in big use anyway

So there I am with 100 MB/s, and Spectrum goes and tells all its local customers, 'here, 200MB/s is our new base rate.  Thats you"

Most everything worked, but HBOmax became shiat.  Apparently their builtin spyware system wasn't very tolerant to lost packets, especially layered on top of chromes spy system, and the new firehose was causing lost packets, So it is buffering-spinning every few seconds.  wtf  (firefox didn't like it either, and mysteriously even though Edge is chrome under the hood, it was still working, which is why I consider Google's spycrap as contributing to the problem)

So I ended up dumping my 100MB/s switches.  The router had a GB/s ethernet to the cable modem, but everything else was 100MB/s.  Since it was 4 years old, I upgraded it too.

I expected to upgrade the cable modem too, but surprisingly as I was doing incremental upgrades, the old cacle modem actually had no problems with the 200MB/s DOCSIS rate.  I had already bought the new modem anyway, so its installed too, because I wanted to be sure it worked before the Amazon return date lapsed

See how increased bandwidth and spyware helps provides manufacturing jobs!

/In china and latvia
 
2021-05-09 10:11:56 AM  

Theeng: Meanwhile where I live in shiatty rural America I'm lucky to have 3 mbps.


Don't listen to subby. 400GB is network backbone. Internal datacenter server to server communication stuff. No one is getting 400GB internet anytime soon.

Internet speeds at the 1Gb it into 2Gb and maybe as high as 5Gb you'll see for a bit.

For you folks living in the boonies, 3Mps is still pretty sad. 10Mpbs or 20Mpbs is more common, but you don't have to be that rural to get screwed. Even living 6 blocked from me in Denver where I have 1.2Gbps from Comcast, the speeds top out at 100Mpbs, and it was only a few years ago that same area was only 20Mpbs.

The tech improves quite a bit all the time, but distance is still an issue. You really can't be that far from a hub or a fiber pull if you want good internet speed. And pulling those miles is expensive as hell.
 
2021-05-09 10:30:21 AM  

Boudyro: ZAZ: I remember when the campus backbone upgraded from a 10 Mbps token ring to 100 Mbps FDDI.

The article is about ISP internal equipment. Nothing there for a home user. You'd have to have a LAN party with hundreds of gamers to make that switch breathe hard.

Yeah we're already very close to where any top end (meaning the people who have gigabit or better) at-home speed increases are going to be masturbatory like 8k TVs.

The bigger challenge is getting gigabit speeds to everyone who wants it. Because it's not profitable for the corporate ISPs.


$99/mo for 1Gbps here in northern Maine.  Guess the local ISP figures we may as well have fast internet while stuck indoors behind 5' of snow.
 
2021-05-09 11:05:25 AM  

likefunbutnot: For someone looking for an inexpensive way to up their home LAN game, Infiniband hardware dirt cheap on ebay. The only costly thing about it is the media. But you can get 40Gbps HBAs for $50 and a switch for $100 or so. IP networking works he same over Infiniband as it does over Ethernet, so it's not a big deal to put in place.


I moved to a 10gb LAN about 2-3 years ago, but I have 3 storage servers with a bunch of TB of data on them and I'm often moving big files around.

For the majority of people they won't really see any real tangible benefits from a LAN at 10gb or 5gb, nevermind 40gb. Best thing most people can do to improve their home LAN is just not use the cheapo ISP provided router/access point. Just upgrading that (and putting any wireless access points in smart places) should work good for most people.

But unless they're moving lots of files around their LAN, more than gb networking inside a house is usually just total overkill.
 
2021-05-09 11:13:36 AM  
Right now, as an ISP, I'd rather have 4x100G lines (split across at least two different transit providers) that a single incredibly expensive point of failure.

Perhaps places that have huge LANs/Intranets might rush to 400G - could do great things for those with tons of East-West traffic within their own network, but I'm not certain we're going to see it at the backbone level for a while.  Moving to 100G was a delicate balance between increased throughput per-flow and sacrificed redundancy (due to per-port costs).

Luckily, most vendors are sane and I can buy a 400G switch/linecard that supports breaking those few 400G ports down into more 14x00G or even 10x40G ports, making is less of a pain to upgrade when the time does come.  Right now 10G NICs (in the datacenter) are pretty ubiquitous - perhaps when that number is 40 instead, and we see the home/eyeball users with 10G everywhere, we'll see more 400G outside of private/internal setups.
 
2021-05-09 11:14:49 AM  
14x00G == 4x100G -- oops.
 
2021-05-09 11:15:56 AM  

xanadian: Boudyro: ZAZ: I remember when the campus backbone upgraded from a 10 Mbps token ring to 100 Mbps FDDI.

The article is about ISP internal equipment. Nothing there for a home user. You'd have to have a LAN party with hundreds of gamers to make that switch breathe hard.

Yeah we're already very close to where any top end (meaning the people who have gigabit or better) at-home speed increases are going to be masturbatory like 8k TVs.

The bigger challenge is getting gigabit speeds to everyone who wants it. Because it's not profitable for the corporate ISPs.

$99/mo for 1Gbps here in northern Maine.  Guess the local ISP figures we may as well have fast internet while stuck indoors behind 5' of snow.


I pay $82 a month for 35/5 and that is the only option where I am in the sticks of Southern Maine. I'm kind of jealous of you up there now.
 
2021-05-09 11:40:39 AM  
Honestly, who the fark needs more than 1gbps for a home network?
 
2021-05-09 12:25:49 PM  

Quantumbunny: Don't listen to subby. 400GB is network backbone. Internal datacenter server to server communication stuff. No one is getting 400GB internet anytime soon.


https://www.storagereview.com/review/​n​etapp-aff-a800-review is an example of where this stuff will be used (although that model only has 100 GbE ports). When you're shoving petabytes of data around, it's easier to use a few fast interfaces than to try to load-balance your traffic across multiple 10 GbE links.
 
2021-05-09 12:28:37 PM  

Quantumbunny: The tech improves quite a bit all the time, but distance is still an issue. You really can't be that far from a hub or a fiber pull if you want good internet speed. And pulling those miles is expensive as hell.


I looked at this recently. A non-exhaustive search showed that pulling fiber was about a tenth of the cost of pulling power. So it's not *that* expensive. We just don't want everybody to really have it.
/maybe actually forcing telcos to do what they said they'd do back in the 90s would be a start.
 
2021-05-09 12:44:24 PM  

lifeslammer: Honestly, who the fark needs more than 1gbps for a home network?


You could probably make the same argument regarding 100 Mbps.  Not many apps home users use need that much bandwidth to function.

That said, there are a lot of scenarios where a fast network makes things much nicer.  When I moved all of my household's media onto a NAS server, bumping up to a 2.5 Gbps network made it act a whole lot more like local storage.
 
2021-05-09 12:53:08 PM  

lifeslammer: Honestly, who the fark needs more than 1gbps for a home network?

 
2021-05-09 1:11:50 PM  

Dinjiin: lifeslammer: Honestly, who the fark needs more than 1gbps for a home network?

You could probably make the same argument regarding 100 Mbps.  Not many apps home users use need that much bandwidth to function.

That said, there are a lot of scenarios where a fast network makes things much nicer.  When I moved all of my household's media onto a NAS server, bumping up to a 2.5 Gbps network made it act a whole lot more like local storage.


Yep. Get past 3 simultaneous users and the local network will get bogged down, even with a 1 gbps local network. The pauses are real. Would it be nice externally? Yes. But locally, it's pretty much a necessity.

That said, I haven't bought a (non-tablet/phone) computer with anything less than a 1gb ethernet port in at least 15 years. I'm annoyed that it's been a holding pattern on consumer-grade machines ever since.
 
2021-05-09 1:29:21 PM  
Awesome. My brand new cheap-a** laptop has 100Mbit Ethernet so I'm totally set.
 
2021-05-09 2:03:54 PM  

writingdude: Dinjiin: lifeslammer: Honestly, who the fark needs more than 1gbps for a home network?

You could probably make the same argument regarding 100 Mbps.  Not many apps home users use need that much bandwidth to function.

That said, there are a lot of scenarios where a fast network makes things much nicer.  When I moved all of my household's media onto a NAS server, bumping up to a 2.5 Gbps network made it act a whole lot more like local storage.

Yep. Get past 3 simultaneous users and the local network will get bogged down, even with a 1 gbps local network. The pauses are real. Would it be nice externally? Yes. But locally, it's pretty much a necessity.

That said, I haven't bought a (non-tablet/phone) computer with anything less than a 1gb ethernet port in at least 15 years. I'm annoyed that it's been a holding pattern on consumer-grade machines ever since.


What kind of crap switch are you using that you can't sustain three users?
 
2021-05-09 2:05:26 PM  
Between myself, the wife and the kids watching Netflix, Youtube, Hulu, etc, we have a 50MB connection for $50/month and have had it for like 8 or 9 years.  Never had any issues with the bandwidth.
 
2021-05-09 2:11:04 PM  

knackx: Right now, as an ISP, I'd rather have 4x100G lines (split across at least two different transit providers) that a single incredibly expensive point of failure.

Perhaps places that have huge LANs/Intranets might rush to 400G - could do great things for those with tons of East-West traffic within their own network, but I'm not certain we're going to see it at the backbone level for a while.  Moving to 100G was a delicate balance between increased throughput per-flow and sacrificed redundancy (due to per-port costs).

Luckily, most vendors are sane and I can buy a 400G switch/linecard that supports breaking those few 400G ports down into more 14x00G or even 10x40G ports, making is less of a pain to upgrade when the time does come.  Right now 10G NICs (in the datacenter) are pretty ubiquitous - perhaps when that number is 40 instead, and we see the home/eyeball users with 10G everywhere, we'll see more 400G outside of private/internal setups.


Yeah, the Mellanox switches we use are broken out in 10/40/100 ports, but our test network backbones are only 40, so we can do port to port with the 100 cards for test, but anything on the network outside of that is getting buffered down and that can put a lot of overhead on the switch depending...so we don't do that. We test some pretty high end cards, and I haven't seen anything close to 400...
 
2021-05-09 2:31:06 PM  

Theeng: Meanwhile where I live in shiatty rural America I'm lucky to have 3 mbps.


Why should a city dweller care about your poor life choices?
/Kidding, but republicans say that shiat all the time
 
2021-05-09 2:31:57 PM  

sleze: Between myself, the wife and the kids watching Netflix, Youtube, Hulu, etc, we have a 50MB connection for $50/month and have had it for like 8 or 9 years.  Never had any issues with the bandwidth.


That's what people don't get. They don't monitor their bandwidth so they have no clue what they are using or what they need. So they end up overpaying.

But hey, they have more bandwidth to you, and to some that's the point.
 
2021-05-09 2:32:02 PM  

sleze: Between myself, the wife and the kids watching Netflix, Youtube, Hulu, etc, we have a 50MB connection for $50/month and have had it for like 8 or 9 years.  Never had any issues with the bandwidth.


Your kids will when they download AAA games
 
2021-05-09 2:44:45 PM  
For the downloading part. Once they are playing online for like, the actual game, they won't. Until an update comes out.

But waiting an hour for a download might be an opportunity to, I don't know, teach your kid some patience?
 
2021-05-09 3:04:22 PM  
Sigh.....ok, I will say it, although as an IT guy, I really shouldn't.

But will it run Crysis?
 
2021-05-09 3:06:43 PM  

cretinbob: sleze: Between myself, the wife and the kids watching Netflix, Youtube, Hulu, etc, we have a 50MB connection for $50/month and have had it for like 8 or 9 years.  Never had any issues with the bandwidth.

That's what people don't get. They don't monitor their bandwidth so they have no clue what they are using or what they need. So they end up overpaying.

But hey, they have more bandwidth to you, and to some that's the point.


Depends on what you do, and the value to you.

I pay for 1Gb (1.2Gb), not because I have 14 people using the connection... In fact it's just me. I do it because I'm impatient. When I but a game on Steam, usually I intend to play it as soon as I buy it. I don't want Windows updates or other things to download in the background, I do it on my schedule, as immediately as possible. When I use a streaming service I don't there to be a limit. I like streaming in 4k, and if I want 8k I want that option... While VPNed in for work doing development.

98% of the time I absolutely don't need 1Gb. But I want it for the 2%.
 
2021-05-09 4:24:51 PM  

likefunbutnot: For someone looking for an inexpensive way to up their home LAN game, Infiniband hardware dirt cheap on ebay. The only costly thing about it is the media. But you can get 40Gbps HBAs for $50 and a switch for $100 or so. IP networking works he same over Infiniband as it does over Ethernet, so it's not a big deal to put in place.


Why thank you sir, I had no idea.

/ wrings hands deviously
 
2021-05-09 4:37:56 PM  

asymptonic: likefunbutnot: For someone looking for an inexpensive way to up their home LAN game, Infiniband hardware dirt cheap on ebay. The only costly thing about it is the media. But you can get 40Gbps HBAs for $50 and a switch for $100 or so. IP networking works he same over Infiniband as it does over Ethernet, so it's not a big deal to put in place.

Why thank you sir, I had no idea.

/ wrings hands deviously


Holy fark you aren't kidding.  24-port switch for $60.  What happened that forced all this hardware out of service? 10gbE?
 
2021-05-09 4:38:32 PM  
Even the data center I work at rarely sees our current 10Gbps circuits more than half utilized.  Higher bandwidth pipe into the data center, sure, that's useful.  But at least right now we don't even have a need to move to 40Gbps inside the data center.  Still a good idea for new construction to have an upgrade path to at least 400Gbps whether you'll be using it day one or not.
 
2021-05-09 4:47:03 PM  

Quantumbunny: cretinbob: sleze: Between myself, the wife and the kids watching Netflix, Youtube, Hulu, etc, we have a 50MB connection for $50/month and have had it for like 8 or 9 years.  Never had any issues with the bandwidth.

That's what people don't get. They don't monitor their bandwidth so they have no clue what they are using or what they need. So they end up overpaying.

But hey, they have more bandwidth to you, and to some that's the point.

Depends on what you do, and the value to you.

I pay for 1Gb (1.2Gb), not because I have 14 people using the connection... In fact it's just me. I do it because I'm impatient. When I but a game on Steam, usually I intend to play it as soon as I buy it. I don't want Windows updates or other things to download in the background, I do it on my schedule, as immediately as possible. When I use a streaming service I don't there to be a limit. I like streaming in 4k, and if I want 8k I want that option... While VPNed in for work doing development.

98% of the time I absolutely don't need 1Gb. But I want it for the 2%.


Nothing wrong with that.
When I generalize about "most people" it's not inclusive of everyone, hence the qualifier "most". I'm also talking about people outside of Fark.
I think Farkers overall are a bit more savvy than the average person.

I use wifi. I'm cool with long downloads because I am older than the internet. I can stream YouTube no problem. If I get a 20Mbps connection, that's great. That's also off my phone or a hotspot designed for urban use.  Metering is my bane. I do have an unlimited hotspot but it's under recall because the batteries are bad and mine is bulging.

Once I get around to it though, I'm going to get a better router and an external antenna. If I use a yagi I can point it at a major communication center and get straight into the backbone. Better signal means more bandwidth. Throw a line amp in and 5G should be close.

My ping from Ann Arbor to Chicago is around 30ms. I really can't complain about anything except signal drop, which is another reason why the antenna.

Someday 1Gbps will be slow too.
 
2021-05-09 6:42:38 PM  

Pointy Tail of Satan: Sigh.....ok, I will say it, although as an IT guy, I really shouldn't.

But will it run Crysis?


Basically all managed L3 switches have x86_64 management computers embedded in them, have had for a good while.

If you setup Linux and had it forward the display somewhere... Or plugged a gfx card into the internal pcie slot... Quite possibly.
 
2021-05-09 6:57:58 PM  

asymptonic: likefunbutnot: For someone looking for an inexpensive way to up their home LAN game, Infiniband hardware dirt cheap on ebay. The only costly thing about it is the media. But you can get 40Gbps HBAs for $50 and a switch for $100 or so. IP networking works he same over Infiniband as it does over Ethernet, so it's not a big deal to put in place.

Why thank you sir, I had no idea.

/ wrings hands deviously


While it's certainly true that QDR Infiniband equipment can be had for peanuts because it's being replaced with EDR and HDR, bear in mind for home use:

- You'll pay a big performance and latency price for using IPoIB vs native IB, and nothing will understand native IB
- Applications that aren't high performance, multithreaded, architecture-optimized won't have a clue what to do with anything faster than 10Gbps anyway

Regardless of the number of test threads, I've rarely been able to make a 100Gbps IPoIB link carry more than maybe 55-60Gbps. Proviso, this was without connected mode enabled (which lets you skip a lot of TCP overhead).

I've never seen even the simplest data-saver code push more than maybe 700MBps per thread that was actually doing anything.
 
2021-05-09 7:32:35 PM  

Boudyro: ZAZ: I remember when the campus backbone upgraded from a 10 Mbps token ring to 100 Mbps FDDI.

The article is about ISP internal equipment. Nothing there for a home user. You'd have to have a LAN party with hundreds of gamers to make that switch breathe hard.

Yeah we're already very close to where any top end (meaning the people who have gigabit or better) at-home speed increases are going to be masturbatory like 8k TVs.

The bigger challenge is getting gigabit speeds to everyone who wants it. Because it's not profitable for the corporate ISPs.


it's profitable. Fibre to the home keeps coming down in price. Municipal fibre projects show how cheap it is.

Problem is you no longer have an upgrade to sell later on, like how home PCs sales plateaued, so corporate ISPs drag their feet.
 
2021-05-09 8:05:31 PM  

null: Day_Old_Dutchie: Boudyro: ZAZ: I remember when the campus backbone upgraded from a 10 Mbps token ring to 100 Mbps FDDI.

The article is about ISP internal equipment. Nothing there for a home user. You'd have to have a LAN party with hundreds of gamers to make that switch breathe hard.

Yeah we're already very close to where any top end (meaning the people who have gigabit or better) at-home speed increases are going to be masturbatory like 8k TVs.

The bigger challenge is getting gigabit speeds to everyone who wants it. Because it's not profitable for the corporate ISPs.

I remember when 2400bps was considered 'high speed'.

I just put seed down, get off my lawn.


Jumps into this thread a day late
Sca ra 9
=m1 jam ^m jam ^m jam ^m
(Waits 30 seconds)
=x
 
2021-05-09 8:18:44 PM  

Quantumbunny: Theeng: Meanwhile where I live in shiatty rural America I'm lucky to have 3 mbps.

Don't listen to subby. 400GB is network backbone. Internal datacenter server to server communication stuff. No one is getting 400GB internet anytime soon.

Internet speeds at the 1Gb it into 2Gb and maybe as high as 5Gb you'll see for a bit.

For you folks living in the boonies, 3Mps is still pretty sad. 10Mpbs or 20Mpbs is more common, but you don't have to be that rural to get screwed. Even living 6 blocked from me in Denver where I have 1.2Gbps from Comcast, the speeds top out at 100Mpbs, and it was only a few years ago that same area was only 20Mpbs.

The tech improves quite a bit all the time, but distance is still an issue. You really can't be that far from a hub or a fiber pull if you want good internet speed. And pulling those miles is expensive as hell.


Connexion is offering residential symmetrical 10Gb for $300/mo.
 
2021-05-09 8:28:10 PM  

Pointy Tail of Satan: Sigh.....ok, I will say it, although as an IT guy, I really shouldn't.

But will it run Crysis?


My router is slimline HP PC with CPU: Intel(R) Celeron(R) CPU G3930 @ 2.90GHz (2904.13-MHz K8-class CPU) real memory = 4294967296 (4096 MB) running OPNSense and an Intel server-grade dual NIC card.

I honestly would advise anyone serious about network performance to go with an actual PC with dual-NICs running OPNSense into a switch instead of the commodity off the shelf router/wireless AP combo, even if you hack your router to run OpenWRT.  The chips in the routers just don't keep up and you have the endless firmware update/no longer supported fun or the joy of OpenWRT.  The PC will last you a long time, the WiFi technology will pass you by.  Ars Technica did a good rundown of Build Your Own Router vs. the upper tier of commercial router/APs some time ago and the network testing bore BYOR out.

Right now I have my OPNSense intercepting all DNS queries that aren't using my choice of DNS servers and piping them back through Unbound DNS and sending them out to 1.1.1.1 using DNS over TLS, so the ISP can't spy on my DNS queries.  Plus if it comes down to it I can multihome or go with cellular backup if the cable modem goes down.
 
2021-05-09 8:41:14 PM  

ZAZ: I remember when the campus backbone upgraded from a 10 Mbps token ring to 100 Mbps FDDI.

The article is about ISP internal equipment. Nothing there for a home user. You'd have to have a LAN party with hundreds of gamers to make that switch breathe hard.


Token Ring [ugh...I feel dirty even saying it] was either 4 or 16 mbit. Classic IBM 802.5, that is. If it was something weird like Token Bus, it could have been anything.

Source: I admit to designing Token Ring interface cards.
 
2021-05-09 9:52:46 PM  

mongbiohazard: likefunbutnot: For someone looking for an inexpensive way to up their home LAN game, Infiniband hardware dirt cheap on ebay. The only costly thing about it is the media. But you can get 40Gbps HBAs for $50 and a switch for $100 or so. IP networking works he same over Infiniband as it does over Ethernet, so it's not a big deal to put in place.

I moved to a 10gb LAN about 2-3 years ago, but I have 3 storage servers with a bunch of TB of data on them and I'm often moving big files around.

For the majority of people they won't really see any real tangible benefits from a LAN at 10gb or 5gb, nevermind 40gb. Best thing most people can do to improve their home LAN is just not use the cheapo ISP provided router/access point. Just upgrading that (and putting any wireless access points in smart places) should work good for most people.



Well, yes. But for some of us, it isn't. My main file server has around 220TB of addressable storage with a second system having about 96TB. Some of that is video projects (and some of THAT is 8k footage now) and some of it is VMs, but moving files in 200GB chunks at cache drive-native speed is not out of the question and that's really pretty nice to have.

And, as I said, it's a dead cheap upgrade if you're a person who actually needs it.
 
2021-05-09 10:09:31 PM  

erik-k: - Applications that aren't high performance, multithreaded, architecture-optimized won't have a clue what to do with anything faster than 10Gbps anyway


If you have a relevant RDMA implementation up and running on your client and server, you can definitely get SMB/NFS performance between fast NAND that matches native drive speed for your nVMe or PCIe drives. I don't have anything that really writes faster than 2GB/s, but for large sequential transfers (mostly from huge video files) I do see 2GB/s between my three systems.
 
2021-05-09 11:06:36 PM  

cretinbob: sleze: Between myself, the wife and the kids watching Netflix, Youtube, Hulu, etc, we have a 50MB connection for $50/month and have had it for like 8 or 9 years.  Never had any issues with the bandwidth.

That's what people don't get. They don't monitor their bandwidth so they have no clue what they are using or what they need. So they end up overpaying.

But hey, they have more bandwidth to you, and to some that's the point.


Honestly, for download, we'd be fine with Spectrum's base plan. That plan's upload sucks major ass, though (10mbps), so people who work from home pretty much have to go higher.

/940/40 here
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2021-05-10 7:04:45 AM  

Flowery Twats: ZAZ: I remember when the campus backbone upgraded from a 10 Mbps token ring to 100 Mbps FDDI.

The article is about ISP internal equipment. Nothing there for a home user. You'd have to have a LAN party with hundreds of gamers to make that switch breathe hard.

Token Ring [ugh...I feel dirty even saying it] was either 4 or 16 mbit. Classic IBM 802.5, that is. If it was something weird like Token Bus, it could have been anything.

Source: I admit to designing Token Ring interface cards.


Proteon 10 Mbps.  Not the most popular.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2021-05-10 7:09:40 AM  

Flowery Twats: Source: I admit to designing Token Ring interface cards.


If it's secret confession time, I admit to writing a device driver for the Siemens Nixdorf version of Unix.  I say that now, decades later, confident that nobody will offer me a job like the last time I admitted it.
 
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