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(The Verge)   Microsoft's ChromeOS competitor, Windows 10X, gets strangled in the development lab   (theverge.com) divider line
    More: Sad, Operating system, Personal computer, Microsoft, Windows Vista, lighter version of Windows, Internet Explorer, Graphical user interface, Microsoft Windows  
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851 clicks; posted to STEM » on 07 May 2021 at 10:03 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



40 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-05-07 6:16:05 PM  
I don't know why. WindowsCE was such a great success.
 
2021-05-07 6:20:31 PM  
I liked my Surface RT. That was actually a great machine, and had tons of features that Apple took years to bring to the iPad, and many the iPad still lacks.
 
2021-05-07 6:21:55 PM  
Remember the Windows Phone? I do. LOL.
 
2021-05-07 6:42:29 PM  
They'll get it right by 20Xd6
 
2021-05-07 7:15:17 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: Surface RT


Yea...great computer with no way to even upgrade the search engine from the bronze age. 500 bucks down the drain because it is worthless in today's world 5 years latter. Damn it looks good though. Schit! not even useful to use in the kitchen to look up recipes because it won't bring up most web sites. Typical POS Microschit product.
 
2021-05-07 10:12:42 PM  
GOOD. I'm sure they'll get a competitor out of the gate eventually, but if you've ever tried to use a Chromebook as your primary workstation - or an iPad for that matter - you will see why we still have mature operating systems. It is easier, day to day, to use any linux distribution on the market compared to what ships on a Chromebook.

Yeah, yeah, I know - ChromeOS is linux. But it's linux with all the good parts blocked. You're working on a glorified phone.
 
2021-05-07 10:21:14 PM  
Dear Microsoft, just make one big monolithic Windows that works well and does everything. Feel free to lock the enterprise stuff off on the Home Edition.

Feel free to hide the best stuff behind the "Add New Features" thing.

We don't need Windows on Raspberry Pis.

Storage is insanely cheap now. You don't make a phone anymore.

No one likes cut down junk, especially if the full product can be cut down in the same way until you need it.
 
2021-05-07 10:24:28 PM  
I probably would have thrown that on my old Surface Book 4 for just a web/media device.
 
2021-05-07 10:28:30 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: I liked my Surface RT. That was actually a great machine, and had tons of features that Apple took years to bring to the iPad, and many the iPad still lacks.


I got one for a work project. It was just too slow to be usable and the available apps were terrible. The terrible type covers on the first-generation Surfaces meant that it wasn't even a good machine for basic email and office work.

All the Surfaces were pretty bad prior to the Surface Pro 3.
 
2021-05-07 10:29:31 PM  
You will have to drag my OS from my cold dead fingers.

Fark user imageView Full Size


Mind you, the games are kinda crappy. I mean, you can only type "xyzzy" so many times.
 
2021-05-07 10:42:09 PM  
"We're expecting a lot of visual changes to arrive in the Windows 10 21H2 update that should appear in October. "

Translation:  "You thought you finally knew exactly where to go to assign a drive letter to a network share.  Nope, we moved it, and much more, again"
 
2021-05-07 10:42:17 PM  

Lsherm: GOOD. I'm sure they'll get a competitor out of the gate eventually, but if you've ever tried to use a Chromebook as your primary workstation - or an iPad for that matter - you will see why we still have mature operating systems. It is easier, day to day, to use any linux distribution on the market compared to what ships on a Chromebook.

Yeah, yeah, I know - ChromeOS is linux. But it's linux with all the good parts blocked. You're working on a glorified phone.


You clearly don't know what you're talking about.

I have a chromebook, and thanks to crostini, I have a full debian toolbox. I run vscode, git, libreoffice (flatpack), a full texlive distribution, and steam (flatpack). It all works seamlessly integrated with the chromeos desktop. It's replaced my old macbook and my wife's windows laptop. Other than official microsoft office (office 360 web and the android version still work), there really isn't anything we can't do on the chromebook. And most android apps work too.

It's like linux, without the bad parts.
 
2021-05-07 10:43:21 PM  
Microsoft Product Development Meeting:
"Man, the Apple Touchbar is getting heaps of hate. So I think we include one, and make it bigger in our new device."

cdn.vox-cdn.comView Full Size
 
2021-05-07 10:43:45 PM  
Well, there goes my hope for a new Windows phone. I was hoping they were going to make 10X an option the the Surface Duo 2. Guess I'll bite the bullet and put Win10 on my Lumia 950XL, try and get some extra life out of it.
 
2021-05-07 10:53:36 PM  
"Let's use this blowpig OS and cut it down instead of starting from something lean. This is fine."
 
2021-05-07 11:09:42 PM  

Tax Boy: I have a chromebook, and thanks to crostini


Thanks, I know exactly what I'm talking about.
 
2021-05-07 11:24:40 PM  

ruudbob: Carter Pewterschmidt: Surface RT

Yea...great computer with no way to even upgrade the search engine from the bronze age. 500 bucks down the drain because it is worthless in today's world 5 years latter. Damn it looks good though. Schit! not even useful to use in the kitchen to look up recipes because it won't bring up most web sites. Typical POS Microschit product.


Nine years later. Surface RT was released with Windows 8.0.

The hardware was great for the time. ARM power management gave them great battery life. It's too bad that they didn't catch on and Satya isn't willing to back a product until it does win the way Ballmer and Gates would. I did see a couple hackers who managed to get Windows IOT running on them.
 
2021-05-08 12:02:27 AM  

Lsherm: GOOD. I'm sure they'll get a competitor out of the gate eventually, but if you've ever tried to use a Chromebook as your primary workstation - or an iPad for that matter - you will see why we still have mature operating systems. It is easier, day to day, to use any linux distribution on the market compared to what ships on a Chromebook.

Yeah, yeah, I know - ChromeOS is linux. But it's linux with all the good parts blocked. You're working on a glorified phone.


Chrome OS does everything 95% of the things that 95% of people need. It plays videos, Netflix, YouTube, email, internet, Google docs.

If you're in those 5%s you should buy what you need.

/the above statement applies to every OS
 
2021-05-08 12:44:15 AM  

Gubbo: Lsherm: GOOD. I'm sure they'll get a competitor out of the gate eventually, but if you've ever tried to use a Chromebook as your primary workstation - or an iPad for that matter - you will see why we still have mature operating systems. It is easier, day to day, to use any linux distribution on the market compared to what ships on a Chromebook.

Yeah, yeah, I know - ChromeOS is linux. But it's linux with all the good parts blocked. You're working on a glorified phone.

Chrome OS does everything 95% of the things that 95% of people need [at home]. It plays videos, Netflix, YouTube, email, internet, Google docs.

If you're in those 5%s you should buy what you need.

/the above statement applies to every OS


The problem with Chrome OS is that the people who work and use a computer at work use Windows at work (with normally at least one Windows only application), and they can afford another $50 to get the same machine with Windows and not have to learn a new operating system. So despite their home needs being met, why bother?

The people who ONLY do those things in their lives are kids, and they want games.

Or old people, and they don't want to have to learn a new operating system.
 
2021-05-08 12:46:35 AM  
I can't believe an OS that still chugs along with a million different APIs all the way back to the early 90s can't figure out a way to slim down.

AKA Windows has the huge footprint of software and if they trim down the OS they lose a big chunk of that, at which point there's no reason to choose Windows.  Nobody who has a choice uses Windows for its coolness factor.
 
2021-05-08 12:57:52 AM  

Unscratchable_Itch: Well, there goes my hope for a new Windows phone. I was hoping they were going to make 10X an option the the Surface Duo 2. Guess I'll bite the bullet and put Win10 on my Lumia 950XL, try and get some extra life out of it.


I gave up when W10 wasn't available for the HTC one M8. 2016 I think? My favorite phone.
 
2021-05-08 1:00:55 AM  

dyhchong: Gubbo: Lsherm: GOOD. I'm sure they'll get a competitor out of the gate eventually, but if you've ever tried to use a Chromebook as your primary workstation - or an iPad for that matter - you will see why we still have mature operating systems. It is easier, day to day, to use any linux distribution on the market compared to what ships on a Chromebook.

Yeah, yeah, I know - ChromeOS is linux. But it's linux with all the good parts blocked. You're working on a glorified phone.

Chrome OS does everything 95% of the things that 95% of people need [at home]. It plays videos, Netflix, YouTube, email, internet, Google docs.

If you're in those 5%s you should buy what you need.

/the above statement applies to every OS

The problem with Chrome OS is that the people who work and use a computer at work use Windows at work (with normally at least one Windows only application), and they can afford another $50 to get the same machine with Windows and not have to learn a new operating system. So despite their home needs being met, why bother?

The people who ONLY do those things in their lives are kids, and they want games.

Or old people, and they don't want to have to learn a new operating system.


Interesting theory. Well yes, that would put you in the 5% but you'd be amazed how many modern apps have web versions or the equivalent.

Won't help with really legacy things of course.
 
2021-05-08 1:02:00 AM  

dyhchong: Gubbo: Lsherm: GOOD. I'm sure they'll get a competitor out of the gate eventually, but if you've ever tried to use a Chromebook as your primary workstation - or an iPad for that matter - you will see why we still have mature operating systems. It is easier, day to day, to use any linux distribution on the market compared to what ships on a Chromebook.

Yeah, yeah, I know - ChromeOS is linux. But it's linux with all the good parts blocked. You're working on a glorified phone.

Chrome OS does everything 95% of the things that 95% of people need [at home]. It plays videos, Netflix, YouTube, email, internet, Google docs.

If you're in those 5%s you should buy what you need.

/the above statement applies to every OS

The problem with Chrome OS is that the people who work and use a computer at work use Windows at work (with normally at least one Windows only application), and they can afford another $50 to get the same machine with Windows and not have to learn a new operating system. So despite their home needs being met, why bother?

The people who ONLY do those things in their lives are kids, and they want games.

Or old people, and they don't want to have to learn a new operating system.


Also, learning am operating system is such an old fashioned attitude.

Who needs to learn an OS anymore when just opening a web browser is all you need.
 
2021-05-08 1:07:07 AM  

Vlad_the_Inaner: "We're expecting a lot of visual changes to arrive in the Windows 10 21H2 update that should appear in October. "

Translation:  "You thought you finally knew exactly where to go to assign a drive letter to a network share.  Nope, we moved it, and much more, again"


Yeah thats a week of time I wont get paid for, finding out a way to connect to anything I use all day. Again.
 
2021-05-08 1:07:24 AM  

Gubbo: dyhchong: Gubbo: Lsherm: GOOD. I'm sure they'll get a competitor out of the gate eventually, but if you've ever tried to use a Chromebook as your primary workstation - or an iPad for that matter - you will see why we still have mature operating systems. It is easier, day to day, to use any linux distribution on the market compared to what ships on a Chromebook.

Yeah, yeah, I know - ChromeOS is linux. But it's linux with all the good parts blocked. You're working on a glorified phone.

Chrome OS does everything 95% of the things that 95% of people need [at home]. It plays videos, Netflix, YouTube, email, internet, Google docs.

If you're in those 5%s you should buy what you need.

/the above statement applies to every OS

The problem with Chrome OS is that the people who work and use a computer at work use Windows at work (with normally at least one Windows only application), and they can afford another $50 to get the same machine with Windows and not have to learn a new operating system. So despite their home needs being met, why bother?

The people who ONLY do those things in their lives are kids, and they want games.

Or old people, and they don't want to have to learn a new operating system.

Also, learning am operating system is such an old fashioned attitude.

Who needs to learn an OS anymore when just opening a web browser is all you need.


ahahah hahaah fark off
 
2021-05-08 1:17:25 AM  

Gubbo: Interesting theory. Well yes, that would put you in the 5% but you'd be amazed how many modern apps have web versions or the equivalent.

Won't help with really legacy things of course.


Cloud services suck balls. And I don't always have an internet connection, and a limited data plan on my phone.

With the exception of YouTube, I only use Cloud services that have no alternative, and/or are tacked onto an existing service (like internet banking).

And I only use YouTube regularly as the music I've been listening to lately often doesn't have albums or large data sets and I'm too lazy to seek the individual songs and organise them with the rest of my local music.

For spreadsheets and whatever I download and run LibreOffice locally. Faster, stores locally and I can run lots of separate tabs and not waste time working out which is which.
 
2021-05-08 1:32:39 AM  
Should've never happened, and that's coming from a person who like Windows.  There are full blown Windows laptops out now that get 17+ hours of battery time(Lenovo ideapad).
 
2021-05-08 3:54:11 AM  
I hope I can still call custom OLE and DDE server controls from word basic!
 
2021-05-08 4:10:01 AM  

drjekel_mrhyde: Should've never happened, and that's coming from a person who like Windows.  There are full blown Windows laptops out now that get 17+ hours of battery time(Lenovo ideapad).


Ah, I remember the days when you'd buy a laptop that advertised 12+ hours of battery life and it would JUST squeak through a whole movie before needing a charge and it was just accepted practise.

Then I got a laptop with Kaby Lake quad U processor (after Ryzen came out and Intel finally bumped the core counts) and it blew my mind that that's actually now a thing.
 
2021-05-08 6:23:25 AM  

dyhchong: Dear Microsoft, just make one big monolithic Windows that works well and does everything. Feel free to lock the enterprise stuff off on the Home Edition.

Feel free to hide the best stuff behind the "Add New Features" thing.

We don't need Windows on Raspberry Pis.

Storage is insanely cheap now. You don't make a phone anymore.

No one likes cut down junk, especially if the full product can be cut down in the same way until you need it.


After observing six years of Windows Insider ISO's of Windows, here's what I have observed...

If they plan to take stuff away, it's usually for the Home edition.

If it's crippling, it's another fork, usually for children in school.

If things get really strange, it's yet more forks for presentation screens, unusual custom tablets, etc.

They usually mostly leave the Professional edition alone, unless they add an occasional useful admin utility, or gradually introduce useful improvements.

Yet another reason to chose Windows Professional.

Also, my Raspberry Pi Windows systems make for great local area network file servers / zandronum doom servers.
 
2021-05-08 6:40:26 AM  

cosmiquemuffin: Remember the Windows Phone? I do. LOL.


I remember Windows Phone. I'm probably in the minority here, but I really liked it. My first "smart" phone was a Windows Phone. Its biggest problem was a distinct lack of apps, but otherwise it was great to use and intuitively laid out.

YMMV, of course.
 
2021-05-08 10:15:58 AM  
If there's one thing I'm sure of, it's that we'll see this again in about two years when they've tackled the issue of how to make windows simpler yet still have it be completely backwards compatible. Because if it says Microsoft or windows on it, people will expect to run anything on it, and they're trapped in this infrastructure of their own doom.

Oh, and that same mythical machine up above where it's a chrome book but you spend $50 and it runs regular windows instead and all is sweetness, glory, and light? Perhaps I am wrong, but I have never seen a sub $500 laptop that wasn't too slow within the year. Windows costs money to work well, because aforementioned infrastructure of doom. Now, if you don't want to believe that at least 1 standard deviation has needs that are met just fine by a chrome book, fine by me, but they're out there. They work, they get things done, and when they want to play a game, or edit a movie, they use a device suited to it. Not all things have to be done on the same device.

It's like PC geeks can't fathom or stomach the fact that the arcane secrets they've learned might not be appealing or necessary for everyone.

/ pc geek. But I love my CrBook and my iPad.
// this whole screed could have been replaced by the 'stop liking what I don't like' picture' I suppose.
/// just back it up, whatever it is.
 
2021-05-08 12:56:01 PM  

Tax Boy: Lsherm: GOOD. I'm sure they'll get a competitor out of the gate eventually, but if you've ever tried to use a Chromebook as your primary workstation - or an iPad for that matter - you will see why we still have mature operating systems. It is easier, day to day, to use any linux distribution on the market compared to what ships on a Chromebook.

Yeah, yeah, I know - ChromeOS is linux. But it's linux with all the good parts blocked. You're working on a glorified phone.

You clearly don't know what you're talking about.

I have a chromebook, and thanks to crostini, I have a full debian toolbox. I run vscode, git, libreoffice (flatpack), a full texlive distribution, and steam (flatpack). It all works seamlessly integrated with the chromeos desktop. It's replaced my old macbook and my wife's windows laptop. Other than official microsoft office (office 360 web and the android version still work), there really isn't anything we can't do on the chromebook. And most android apps work too.

It's like linux, without the bad parts.


I'm just curious what kind of work you would actually want to do in VS Code on such low-power machine. I've found that doing Angular/React/Vue isn't optimal on such a machine.
 
2021-05-08 1:06:58 PM  

Mad_Radhu: Carter Pewterschmidt: I liked my Surface RT. That was actually a great machine, and had tons of features that Apple took years to bring to the iPad, and many the iPad still lacks.

I got one for a work project. It was just too slow to be usable and the available apps were terrible. The terrible type covers on the first-generation Surfaces meant that it wasn't even a good machine for basic email and office work.

All the Surfaces were pretty bad prior to the Surface Pro 3.


I'm typing this on my Surface Pro 3 with its type cover. The original Surface RT had exactly the same keyboard cover, but you could also get a cheaper version that had touch membrane keys rather than plastic keys that actually moved. Was yours the membrane one?
 
2021-05-08 1:09:35 PM  

NINEv2: Unscratchable_Itch: Well, there goes my hope for a new Windows phone. I was hoping they were going to make 10X an option the the Surface Duo 2. Guess I'll bite the bullet and put Win10 on my Lumia 950XL, try and get some extra life out of it.

I gave up when W10 wasn't available for the HTC one M8. 2016 I think? My favorite phone.


Still using my M8 today. It's the mobile hotspot for my Surface right now.
 
2021-05-08 1:11:27 PM  

dyhchong: Microsoft Product Development Meeting:
"Man, the Apple Touchbar is getting heaps of hate. So I think we include one, and make it bigger in our new device."

[cdn.vox-cdn.com image 850x566]


That's a whole screen, the same size as the visible top one. The keyboard is an attachment that sits on top of the screen if you want to use it for typing.
 
2021-05-08 1:43:52 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: Mad_Radhu: Carter Pewterschmidt: I liked my Surface RT. That was actually a great machine, and had tons of features that Apple took years to bring to the iPad, and many the iPad still lacks.

I got one for a work project. It was just too slow to be usable and the available apps were terrible. The terrible type covers on the first-generation Surfaces meant that it wasn't even a good machine for basic email and office work.

All the Surfaces were pretty bad prior to the Surface Pro 3.

I'm typing this on my Surface Pro 3 with its type cover. The original Surface RT had exactly the same keyboard cover, but you could also get a cheaper version that had touch membrane keys rather than plastic keys that actually moved. Was yours the membrane one?


Even if you got the better Type Cover for the RT, it didn't have the extra folding bit at the top of the keyboard that allows you to set it at an angle for more comfortable typing.

Fark user imageView Full Size


Typing on a Surface with the keyboard laid flat is just really uncomfortable, even with the non-membrane type cover. The Pro 3 is just where everything came together with the Surface design.
 
2021-05-08 2:42:40 PM  

Mad_Radhu: Carter Pewterschmidt: Mad_Radhu: Carter Pewterschmidt: I liked my Surface RT. That was actually a great machine, and had tons of features that Apple took years to bring to the iPad, and many the iPad still lacks.

I got one for a work project. It was just too slow to be usable and the available apps were terrible. The terrible type covers on the first-generation Surfaces meant that it wasn't even a good machine for basic email and office work.

All the Surfaces were pretty bad prior to the Surface Pro 3.

I'm typing this on my Surface Pro 3 with its type cover. The original Surface RT had exactly the same keyboard cover, but you could also get a cheaper version that had touch membrane keys rather than plastic keys that actually moved. Was yours the membrane one?

Even if you got the better Type Cover for the RT, it didn't have the extra folding bit at the top of the keyboard that allows you to set it at an angle for more comfortable typing.

[Fark user image 425x283]

Typing on a Surface with the keyboard laid flat is just really uncomfortable, even with the non-membrane type cover. The Pro 3 is just where everything came together with the Surface design.


I never found that a problem. Most laptops aren't angled. The only issue is the one that all Surface tablets have, that using it with the keyboard while sitting on your lap is almost impossible. The weight is in the screen and there isn't enough room on your lap for the keyboard and the kickstand. But the idea when using it casually is you'd use it as a tablet anyway. The iPad can't sit on your knee with its keyboard either.
 
2021-05-08 3:17:17 PM  

ethernet76: Tax Boy: Lsherm: GOOD. I'm sure they'll get a competitor out of the gate eventually, but if you've ever tried to use a Chromebook as your primary workstation - or an iPad for that matter - you will see why we still have mature operating systems. It is easier, day to day, to use any linux distribution on the market compared to what ships on a Chromebook.

Yeah, yeah, I know - ChromeOS is linux. But it's linux with all the good parts blocked. You're working on a glorified phone.

You clearly don't know what you're talking about.

I have a chromebook, and thanks to crostini, I have a full debian toolbox. I run vscode, git, libreoffice (flatpack), a full texlive distribution, and steam (flatpack). It all works seamlessly integrated with the chromeos desktop. It's replaced my old macbook and my wife's windows laptop. Other than official microsoft office (office 360 web and the android version still work), there really isn't anything we can't do on the chromebook. And most android apps work too.

It's like linux, without the bad parts.

I'm just curious what kind of work you would actually want to do in VS Code on such low-power machine. I've found that doing Angular/React/Vue isn't optimal on such a machine.


It's a great editor for Latex and Markdown and syncing everything thru github. I don't write code.
 
2021-05-08 4:11:07 PM  

Mr. Eugenides: ruudbob: Carter Pewterschmidt: Surface RT

Nine years later. Surface RT was released with Windows 8.0.

The hardware was great for the time. ARM power management gave them great battery life. It's too bad that they didn't catch on and Satya isn't willing to back a product until it does win the way Ballmer and Gates would. I did see a couple hackers who managed to get Windows IOT running on them.


Yeah, the Surface RT was a disappointment.  But their modern ARM64 tablets like the Surface Pro X are decent.  They're not locked to the Windows Store like RT was, and in current preview releases, they now run most x86 and x64 applications.  Firefox and Edge have native ARM64 Windows builds now.

They can be joined to corporate NT domains, too.
 
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