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(Nature)   Heisenberg compensator v0.1   (nature.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Quantum mechanics, Quantum entanglement, quantum entanglement, Uncertainty principle, physicist Shlomi Kotler, quantum computers, tiny drums, such quantum weirdness  
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1379 clicks; posted to STEM » on 07 May 2021 at 5:18 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



14 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-05-07 5:30:32 AM  
Neat article. I like the clever means they thought up to increase precision. Elegant and creative thinking, there.

From TFA:
This experiment had a different purpose to the one carried out by Kotler's team - the researchers wanted to probe the boundary between quantum and non-quantum behaviour. They tuned the oscillating drums to move in a coordinated but not identical way, so that some of their measurable properties were identical to those of a single, virtual, oscillating drum. In this way, the researchers were able to measure the position of the virtual drum without affecting its velocity. For a normal quantum oscillator, that would be impossible because of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle.
 
2021-05-07 6:58:40 AM  
It sounds like the devices were not isolated. There's a big difference between two disconnected photons separated by a 100 billion miles showing entangled properties and two tiny drums that appear to be connected by a membrane. Sure - they may show the same properties (spins reversed with 100% predictability) - but that doesn't make them actually entangled. However, having said that, if it does work the same way, it doesn't matter. If it actually works this way it would change the face of quantum computing. Or computing in general. All we care about is the "spooky action at a distance" that is less noisy and has more qbits. I think the best quantum computers only have a 100 or so qbits and require highly complex error correction. 100 trillion qbits? Damn. And the best part is how secure it is. Can't hack it unless you figured out something that would get you a Nobel prize in physics and a personalized certificate of achievement from God himself.
 
2021-05-07 7:10:55 AM  
Well then, we should have Scranton Reality Anchors any day now.
 
2021-05-07 7:14:08 AM  
What a Heisenberg compensator may look like:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-05-07 7:16:05 AM  
They work very well, thank you.
 
2021-05-07 7:31:31 AM  
Ba dum tish!
 
2021-05-07 7:43:18 AM  
Boson drums, here we go again, rhythm eternal from a distant time
 
2021-05-07 7:46:44 AM  

PoweredByIrony: They work very well, thank you.


like magnets
 
2021-05-07 7:53:22 AM  

Trik: Well then, we should have Scranton Reality Anchors any day now.


If we can just harness that CloverField Paradox
 
2021-05-07 8:28:15 AM  
I like how macroscopic scale is represented by a cat.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-05-07 8:39:58 AM  

Tyrone Slothrop: What a Heisenberg compensator may look like:
[Fark user image 188x268]


Also what a Heisenberg compensator might look like
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-05-07 9:31:00 AM  
Does this get us close to making an ansible? I want play Doom with someone on Mars.
 
2021-05-07 3:20:21 PM  

Trik: Well then, we should have Scranton Reality Anchors any day now.


I'm still waiting for my Buster Machine and Physics Canceller.

///Grew up expecting to have been drafted into the Space War 10 years ago.
 
2021-05-08 9:36:12 AM  
Heisenburg  penis compensator
i.redd.itView Full Size
 
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