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(HGTV)   It's Tuesday, so time for... Gardening? Sure, why not. By request, it's YOUR Tuesday Gardening thread, LGT summer vegetables 🍆🍅🥒🥬🍉🍇🍈🍓🍒🍑🍐🍎🍄🧅🥑🥝🧄🌶🌽🥔🥕🥦   (hgtv.com) divider line
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169 clicks; posted to Discussion » and Main » on 04 May 2021 at 7:06 PM (2 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-05-04 12:34:31 AM  
By request, we're gonna give a weekly gardening thread a shot. Tell us what you're planting now and why, share some tips, ask for advice, and definitely don't be afraid to show some plant pics.
 
2021-05-04 1:14:08 AM  
I'll start:

What do I do with this?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-05-04 1:50:53 AM  

ox45tallboy: I'll start:

What do I do with this?

[Fark user image image 400x533]


Saute in butter and your whole house smells yummy!
Looking forward to this going forward. I've got a yearning for gardening, but no knowledge or skill. Apartment living is also an issue. Help is surely needed.
 
2021-05-04 1:53:52 AM  
I spent the other day shoveling a half cubic yard of soil into a couple of new raised beds; discovered muscle groups that don't care for that
 
2021-05-04 2:18:35 AM  

poeg: ox45tallboy: I'll start:

What do I do with this?

[Fark user image image 400x533]

Saute in butter and your whole house smells yummy!
Looking forward to this going forward. I've got a yearning for gardening, but no knowledge or skill. Apartment living is also an issue. Help is surely needed.


I bought a bag of red onions and got one out and then didn't look at it for a couple of weeks and went to get another and saw this. I don't know if the onion itself is still good (I've cut into a tomato that was sprouting on the inside before and it wasn't good), but if it's gonna grow, I wouldn't mind having some fresh onions later this year.

So do I put it in water now and plant it later? Dig a hole and put it in? How deep? just to the bottom of the stalks, or deeper? Or leave part of the onion out? Does it need a really sunny place, or one that's shady part of the day?

I live in the Mississippi Valley area of West TN, with summertime temps in the 90s and occasionally the 100s. Lots of people farm around me. so I believe the soil is good.
 
2021-05-04 4:02:39 AM  

Moderator: By request, we're gonna give a weekly gardening thread a shot. Tell us what you're planting now and why, share some tips, ask for advice, and definitely don't be afraid to show some plant pics.


Thank you !

I hope that this is open to all plants, either food or decorative.
 
2021-05-04 6:23:10 AM  
Yesterday made some progress on eradicating the alium the previous tenant let spread everywhere the ferns didn't spread. (ferns were dealt with last summer)

The plan for my next two days (my weekend) is to finish digging up the alium and get that area ready for the native sunflowers I want to put there instead. The sunflowers are currently in little peat pots that they are very quickly outgrowing, need to get them in the ground very soon!

If I have time there'll be a trip to Gertens to get some switchgrass and annuals for some other spots. I want to make my little area as inviting as possible for the birbs and the pollinators.
 
2021-05-04 6:57:09 AM  

ox45tallboy: poeg: ox45tallboy: I'll start:

What do I do with this?

[Fark user image image 400x533]

Saute in butter and your whole house smells yummy!
Looking forward to this going forward. I've got a yearning for gardening, but no knowledge or skill. Apartment living is also an issue. Help is surely needed.

I bought a bag of red onions and got one out and then didn't look at it for a couple of weeks and went to get another and saw this. I don't know if the onion itself is still good (I've cut into a tomato that was sprouting on the inside before and it wasn't good), but if it's gonna grow, I wouldn't mind having some fresh onions later this year.

So do I put it in water now and plant it later? Dig a hole and put it in? How deep? just to the bottom of the stalks, or deeper? Or leave part of the onion out? Does it need a really sunny place, or one that's shady part of the day?

I live in the Mississippi Valley area of West TN, with summertime temps in the 90s and occasionally the 100s. Lots of people farm around me. so I believe the soil is good.


This should get you started link

I've done it before. I like doing it because it's a volunteer. Currently the  soil in my larger plot is too dense and the clay holds too much water and drowns onions.  Otherwise I'd have planted the one I found the other day. I *could* have put in my raised beds but those are reserved for radishes and salad greens.
 
2021-05-04 7:41:44 AM  
So, today in the continuing saga of gardening hell... The hell I love. Mostly.

Here in NE Indiana we've had two freezes and it looks like a frost coming later this week. Several friends have lost the plants they'd put in the ground or sown from seed. I have only planted relatively hardy greens and radishes. I had old storm windows I used to cover the raised beds so I haven't lost anything. Yay!

But due to the weather I've had setbacks with the tomato and peppers I started from seed in March. I start those in an improvised light-box I set up in the basement. Then I transplant them when they are big enough and usually transfer them to the back deck. I let them grow there and get hardy. But due to to the inclement weather I've had to bring them inside several times and even then I lost a few.

Usually the seedlings would be fine in the half-assed mini greenhouse I set up on my deck. But we had snow (WTF!) a couple weeks ago and the accumulation collapsed my cruddy greenhouse. I'd brought the plants inside so it wasn't a catastrophic loss but I did lose some outdoor time for the starts. This is a problem because, by now, those starts would be used to the outdoor conditions and I could cycle the rest of my seedlings out into the relative safety of the half-assed mini greenhouse.

No big deal, right? Except I have 200 tomato and pepper starts outside and another 300 inside that need to get outside. Like last week... But the forecast says there is another night this week that will be too cold for my indoor seedlings and not enough room in the mini-greenhouse.

FML

Oh well, I love doing this and I'm just biatching.

Here is a pic of one of the germination trays from a few weeks ago. I think every seed sprouted. I break apart those clusters and select the biggest for transplanting. These are from Cherokee purple and babywine cherry tomato seeds I saved from last year's grow.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-05-04 8:23:38 AM  
I made a large squash bed last year.

The squirrels ate every single squash and zucchini before they were big enough to pick, and if you've grown them, you know those plants produce insane amounts.

I'm either going to go in a murderous squirrel rampage this year, or just skip the part where I dig in the yard.
 
2021-05-04 8:35:40 AM  
This week is all about a race against time to get the beds set up.

We moved into a new place in March, and my wife promptly started way too many seedlings inside. The tomatoes, zucchini, squash, marigold companions, and squash seem to be doing okay, but the cape gooseberries didn't quite make it.

Anyway, the problem now is that we ordered a materials for a few raised beds and an ungodly amount of soil from a local company, but the sunny spot in the yard where the beds need to go isn't flat yet. We're currently in the process of compensating for this by building a series of small retaining walls (less than a foot) to terrace a 10-15% grade and leveling out the soil that's there. It's kind of slow, and we've been a bit preoccupied by all the other home repairs we've needed to do. (The master bedroom still isn't ready yet.)

So, the question now is how fast we can finish the construction and earthmoving, and whether or not the seedlings will outgrow their containers before we do. The timing wasn't great this year, but I suspect many of my weekends this summer will involve similar terrain management for plants that'll go in next year.
 
2021-05-04 8:38:06 AM  
I'm in southeast Michigan.  We've had frost issues here too.  I have a pretty good microclimate going in my garden, but still lost a pepper plant that I put out too early.

I put green beans in this past weekend, and I have a number of hardy greens in the ground from a few weeks ago that ought to be germinating with the steady warm weather.  Looking forward to getting my eggplants in the ground.
 
2021-05-04 9:05:49 AM  
..... WHAT FANTASTIC TIMING!!!!

I am soon moving into my own home, with my own yard. I have always wanted three things. A hot pepper garden, a herb garden, and a tomato garden.....

Here is the thing.... I HAVE ZERO, NADA, ZILCH, CERO, LESS THAN ONE, CLUE WHERE TO BEGIN.

HELP?!
 
2021-05-04 9:10:07 AM  
After many failed years of trying to start a garden, the mrs was on the ball this year. I made a raised bed two years ago, but it hasn't really produced anything beyond a crap load of volunteer pumpkins.

The seedlings:
Fark user imageView Full Size

It's not much, but exponentially more than all the previous years combined.

Then there is the horseradish patch:
Fark user imageView Full Size
They are the taller ones. I got the original stock from my parent's farm.

/I really need to make time for some yard maintenance.
//SE MN for what it's worth
///3's
 
2021-05-04 9:10:11 AM  

FrancoFile: I'm in southeast Michigan.  We've had frost issues here too.  I have a pretty good microclimate going in my garden, but still lost a pepper plant that I put out too early.

I put green beans in this past weekend, and I have a number of hardy greens in the ground from a few weeks ago that ought to be germinating with the steady warm weather.  Looking forward to getting my eggplants in the ground.


Have you tried the trick of covering your plants with a milk jug or juice bottle with the bottom cut off as sort of a mini greenhouse when frost threatens?

wholelifestylenutrition.comView Full Size


Depending on the size of the plant, you might have to get creative.

lh3.googleusercontent.comView Full Size
 
2021-05-04 9:11:43 AM  

poeg: ox45tallboy: I'll start:

Looking forward to this going forward. I've got a yearning for gardening, but no knowledge or skill. Apartment living is also an issue. Help is surely needed.


Use a larger pot that you think you'll need and don't go crazy trying to grow everything at once. Just pick something to try growing, see if it works for you and your location.

You might want to try making a wicking barrel. It doesn't need to be a real barrel, it can be a 5 gallon bucket. These work very well when you can't always be there to water the plants. Just use what you have laying around or can purchase cheaply.

You can use LED lighting indoors if needed. I'm in Maryland and was growing pineapples in a small aquaponics setup last summer. When the first frost was about to happen I simply potted them in soil, moved them to the basement and put an LED light on them with a timer to go off at night.

Start slow with something that peaks your interest. It doesn't need to be anything fancy or edible. Don't put undo pressure on yourself. If what you chose actually grows, excellent. If it doesn't then you know you need to try something different for the next one. It doesn't mean you did anything wrong, it just means that's not for you right now.

Too many folks jump in over their head too quickly. Gardening isn't relaxing if you're overworking yourself. Try a few small houseplants or herbs and see what happens.
 
2021-05-04 9:11:55 AM  

poeg: ox45tallboy: I'll start:

What do I do with this?

[Fark user image image 400x533]

Saute in butter and your whole house smells yummy!
Looking forward to this going forward. I've got a yearning for gardening, but no knowledge or skill. Apartment living is also an issue. Help is surely needed.


See if your area has a community garden that you can rent a small area.
I've seen them in lots of cities.
 
2021-05-04 9:47:40 AM  

drogg: After many failed years of trying to start a garden, the mrs was on the ball this year. I made a raised bed two years ago, but it hasn't really produced anything beyond a crap load of volunteer pumpkins.

The seedlings:
[Fark user image 425x318]
It's not much, but exponentially more than all the previous years combined.

Then there is the horseradish patch:
[Fark user image 425x566]They are the taller ones. I got the original stock from my parent's farm.

/I really need to make time for some yard maintenance.
//SE MN for what it's worth
///3's


Ever try horseradish greens? I can't wait for mine to get a little larger,the young leaves are good on sandwiches as well.
 
2021-05-04 9:53:54 AM  

BullBearMS: FrancoFile: I'm in southeast Michigan.  We've had frost issues here too.  I have a pretty good microclimate going in my garden, but still lost a pepper plant that I put out too early.

I put green beans in this past weekend, and I have a number of hardy greens in the ground from a few weeks ago that ought to be germinating with the steady warm weather.  Looking forward to getting my eggplants in the ground.

Have you tried the trick of covering your plants with a milk jug or juice bottle with the bottom cut off as sort of a mini greenhouse when frost threatens?

[wholelifestylenutrition.com image 705x470]

Depending on the size of the plant, you might have to get creative.

[lh3.googleusercontent.com image 512x384]


Yeah, I tried that.  Bucket with straw.  But either I put it on too late or pulled it off too early.  It was also very windy, which didn't help matters.

I put an entire bale of straw down over my herb bed and pin it in place with chicken wire and stakes to protect everything over the winter.  Usually works well.

ox45tallboy: I'll start:

What do I do with this?

[Fark user image 400x533]


Slice thin.
Toss with crumbled feta, lemon juice, olive oil, and oregano.  Let it sit on the counter for a few hours until it wilts down.

Great on a pita sandwich, or use it as the dressing for a pasta salad.
 
2021-05-04 10:03:40 AM  

Driver: Moderator: By request, we're gonna give a weekly gardening thread a shot. Tell us what you're planting now and why, share some tips, ask for advice, and definitely don't be afraid to show some plant pics.

Thank you !

I hope that this is open to all plants, either food or decorative.


Absolutely.  Also, indoor or outdoor. Some of us are in apartments and limited to potted plants.
 
2021-05-04 10:07:36 AM  

Chimpy McSquirrel: poeg: ox45tallboy: I'll start:

What do I do with this?

[Fark user image image 400x533]

Saute in butter and your whole house smells yummy!
Looking forward to this going forward. I've got a yearning for gardening, but no knowledge or skill. Apartment living is also an issue. Help is surely needed.

See if your area has a community garden that you can rent a small area.
I've seen them in lots of cities.


I've got a yard, I just don't know exactly how to plant an onion like this or which side of the yard it should go..
 
2021-05-04 10:10:54 AM  

andyourdog2: Ever try horseradish greens? I can't wait for mine to get a little larger,the young leaves are good on sandwiches as well.


Fark user imageView Full Size


Oh, I'm definitely going to have to try that!
 
2021-05-04 10:14:19 AM  
I got into the raised bed at the new place last week and cleared out the Creeping Begonia. I'm going to go small (a couple of tomatoes, squash, and bell peppers) and see how it goes.
 
2021-05-04 10:22:38 AM  

freakingmoron: ox45tallboy: poeg: ox45tallboy: I'll start:

What do I do with this?

[Fark user image image 400x533]

Saute in butter and your whole house smells yummy!
Looking forward to this going forward. I've got a yearning for gardening, but no knowledge or skill. Apartment living is also an issue. Help is surely needed.

I bought a bag of red onions and got one out and then didn't look at it for a couple of weeks and went to get another and saw this. I don't know if the onion itself is still good (I've cut into a tomato that was sprouting on the inside before and it wasn't good), but if it's gonna grow, I wouldn't mind having some fresh onions later this year.

So do I put it in water now and plant it later? Dig a hole and put it in? How deep? just to the bottom of the stalks, or deeper? Or leave part of the onion out? Does it need a really sunny place, or one that's shady part of the day?

I live in the Mississippi Valley area of West TN, with summertime temps in the 90s and occasionally the 100s. Lots of people farm around me. so I believe the soil is good.

This should get you started link

I've done it before. I like doing it because it's a volunteer. Currently the  soil in my larger plot is too dense and the clay holds too much water and drowns onions.  Otherwise I'd have planted the one I found the other day. I *could* have put in my raised beds but those are reserved for radishes and salad greens.


Throw some Daikon radishes in your larger plot this winter. That'll break that clay up up to a foot down... Saw a project recently where they are using them to see if they can break down disused asphalt roads due to their digging strength.
 
151 [TotalFark] [OhFark]
2021-05-04 10:46:27 AM  
I bought an herb garden kit on Amazon. Bought the exact same one last year, and everything flourished.

This year, each plant grew an inch or two, stopped, and wilted and died. The only difference I can think of is that I moved, so maybe the pH level in my water is doing it?

After the oregano died, my buddy gave me some weed seeds which I planted in that one, all 3 sprouted and grew quickly, till it just stopped a week or so ago.

I'm slightly annoyed. I still have more seeds for the herbs but I don't wanna spend the time doing it just to have them eventually die again. They are in a north facing window that gets a good amount of sun, room temp is 67-70 depending on my mood.
 
2021-05-04 11:00:00 AM  
How to Fix a Patchy, Weedy Lawn | This Old House
Youtube ui2qnOUj6Ec

I seem to find this video every spring, so I might as well contribute here
 
2021-05-04 11:08:41 AM  
Started growing Habanero's, Ghost Peppers, and Jalapeno's last year.  Mostly using them to make homemade hot sauce and hot honey (which is awesome on pizza, btw).   The Ghost Peppers are a little fussy though.  I do get a few peppers to pop, but nothing like the Habs and Jalepenos which have been doing great.

Turns out the Florida climate they're growing in might not be ideal for them, and they don't really like to flower and drop pods in weather over 90.  So most of what I got from them was in the winter months.

They're mostly for novelty anyway, since they're almost too damn hot to do anything with.
 
2021-05-04 11:31:49 AM  
Here in SE WI we've given up on any tomatoes except the smallest cherries; we've never, ever had anything bigger reach maturity before the temps drop in fall and kill them off.

Peppers, on the other hand, we've had great success with.  They're long sprouting so we usually just buy sets that are already 6 inches tall from the local greenhouse.  It helps if they're already in flower or have little starter fruits on them already.  Try to buy a variety that will produce usable "green" peppers as well as ripe peppers.  Then the trick is to let half the peppers per plant go to ripe and pick the other half green as soon as they're usable size.  That'll keep the plant pumping out fruit throughout the season.

Another fun one we did was potatoes.  Specifically the monster size ones for baking, the small russet or reds are usually too cheap in the store to bother with the effort, but you can get two or three of the big ones and turn them into dozens and dozens.  Just buy, wait for the eyes to sprout, then divide up into pieces at least an inch square with one good sprout per.  Bury in little hills 2 feet apart and forget until fall.  Unless you're in an arid area rainfall will be enough.  Don't overwater as you'll cause fungus and rot on your crop.  It does help to break up the soil at least a foot down for every plant for ease of harvest.  Wait until the plant looks dead on top (completely dead) and gently dig up your crop.

It's also the season for starting raspberries if you have the room permanently.   Since we moved we lost our 10 year old plot at the old place but I've already located some wild ones growing close that are sending up shoots almost ready to transplant.  I can detail more (with pics) of anyone's interested.  They're a multi year planting though so if starting this year don't plan on a crop till next year.  They do spread by themselves so after 2-3 seasons you can have a nice plot going.  The last five years in the old place we would give away a quart a week to grateful neighbors after we had eaten our fill.

As per containers/indoor plants.. Strawberries!  They're easy and will keep giving all season long as long you stay on top of them.  Also great outside but you've got to really critter proof them as the rabbits and squirrels will happily eat them as fast as they're ready.  If you're doing it exclusively indoors you'll have to pollinate yourself, but that's just touching all the flowers with your finger to spread around pollen.  Go big with a lot of plants as each will only put out 2-4 berries every three weeks or so.

We've also done lettuces, peas, beans, sunflowers, squash, eggplant, radishes, scallions, and herbs with success.

Never plant mint in the ground as it will take over everything.

As per your onion, they are easy but a multi year crop (they have to winter in the ground) so not really worth the effort vs the cost at the supermarket.  Onions are also very sensitive to soil makeup as the ph levels and trace elements will affect the taste of the onion.  Planting your sprouted onion will yield you a slightly bigger onion in a year, although you can keep cutting and eating the greens if you like those.  Personally I wouldn't bother and start from seed, but again at supermarket prices you'd probably be better growing something else in that space.
 
2021-05-04 11:42:04 AM  
About the same as every year:

Snow peas
Cucumbers
Tomatoes (slicing and Roma)
Bell peppers
Green Chiles (New Mexico)
Lettuce
Carrots
Sweet Potatoes.
Various herbs.

I used to grow pole beans, but have so many in canning jars and the freezer that I won't have to grow any again for a couple years.
 
2021-05-04 11:53:32 AM  

ox45tallboy: poeg: ox45tallboy: I'll start:

What do I do with this?

[Fark user image image 400x533]

Saute in butter and your whole house smells yummy!
Looking forward to this going forward. I've got a yearning for gardening, but no knowledge or skill. Apartment living is also an issue. Help is surely needed.

I bought a bag of red onions and got one out and then didn't look at it for a couple of weeks and went to get another and saw this. I don't know if the onion itself is still good (I've cut into a tomato that was sprouting on the inside before and it wasn't good), but if it's gonna grow, I wouldn't mind having some fresh onions later this year.

So do I put it in water now and plant it later? Dig a hole and put it in? How deep? just to the bottom of the stalks, or deeper? Or leave part of the onion out? Does it need a really sunny place, or one that's shady part of the day?

I live in the Mississippi Valley area of West TN, with summertime temps in the 90s and occasionally the 100s. Lots of people farm around me. so I believe the soil is good.


Onions are biennial.  The first year, they grow from seed and produce a bulb (the onion) which overwinters, and then the second year, the plant uses all that energy stored in the bulb to send up a flower stalk and produce more seeds.

Eat the onion now.  Planting it will not get you a bigger onion, just a cool flower and lots of onion seeds.
 
2021-05-04 12:03:08 PM  

ox45tallboy: poeg: ox45tallboy: I'll start:

What do I do with this?

[Fark user image image 400x533]

Saute in butter and your whole house smells yummy!
Looking forward to this going forward. I've got a yearning for gardening, but no knowledge or skill. Apartment living is also an issue. Help is surely needed.

I bought a bag of red onions and got one out and then didn't look at it for a couple of weeks and went to get another and saw this. I don't know if the onion itself is still good (I've cut into a tomato that was sprouting on the inside before and it wasn't good), but if it's gonna grow, I wouldn't mind having some fresh onions later this year.

So do I put it in water now and plant it later? Dig a hole and put it in? How deep? just to the bottom of the stalks, or deeper? Or leave part of the onion out? Does it need a really sunny place, or one that's shady part of the day?

I live in the Mississippi Valley area of West TN, with summertime temps in the 90s and occasionally the 100s. Lots of people farm around me. so I believe the soil is good.


For you, and that particular onion from the moment its captured in that pic I'd say plant that bulb in fresh potting soil in a large pot, because it will need to be replanted into the ground in a month

/but really
//give it to your wife
///they always know whats best for aged vegetables
 
2021-05-04 12:03:14 PM  
This year sage, beef and onion plant, and moving the saffron bed
 
2021-05-04 12:06:03 PM  

ANDizzleWI: As per your onion, they are easy but a multi year crop (they have to winter in the ground) so not really worth the effort vs the cost at the supermarket.  Onions are also very sensitive to soil makeup as the ph levels and trace elements will affect the taste of the onion.  Planting your sprouted onion will yield you a slightly bigger onion in a year, although you can keep cutting and eating the greens if you like those. Personally I wouldn't bother and start from seed, but again at supermarket prices you'd probably be better growing something else in that space.


How do these taste? Are they like green onions/scallions/chives/leeks?

And if I want to do this, should I plant it now, or put it in some water inside, or just leave it on the counter? How often can I harvest? And how much can I cut without killing it?
 
2021-05-04 12:15:20 PM  

ox45tallboy: ANDizzleWI: As per your onion, they are easy but a multi year crop (they have to winter in the ground) so not really worth the effort vs the cost at the supermarket.  Onions are also very sensitive to soil makeup as the ph levels and trace elements will affect the taste of the onion.  Planting your sprouted onion will yield you a slightly bigger onion in a year, although you can keep cutting and eating the greens if you like those. Personally I wouldn't bother and start from seed, but again at supermarket prices you'd probably be better growing something else in that space.

How do these taste? Are they like green onions/scallions/chives/leeks?

And if I want to do this, should I plant it now, or put it in some water inside, or just leave it on the counter? How often can I harvest? And how much can I cut without killing it?


Scallion-ish.  Probably not as intense due to the size.  If that's the plan plop it in the ground leaving the smallest top of the bulb uncovered.  I'd only harvest about half the greens at a time but that's just to have a steady supply.  Could probably cut them all a bit above the bulb and they'll grow back, but I dunno how long that will take.

Also, if you ever see this book, buy it.  The gardening section is awesome and where I learned most of what I know.
 
2021-05-04 12:18:36 PM  

Be polite walk on the right: give it to your wife


I am unmarried, and I do not believe gifting this to any of the women I know is likely to result in any increase in the likelihood of a change in that status.
 
2021-05-04 12:19:13 PM  
you should plant it yesterday, the "fruit" is rotting because its genetic code having received sufficient sunlight, told it to sprout, repurposing any suitable nutrients it can sap from the loss.

I have seeds I have to start working myself, its already May...
 
2021-05-04 12:23:22 PM  
don't cut anything off it,get it into a 1' planters pot with fresh potting soil and pick a location outside to put it where it can be easily seen and/or watered because it needs as much sunlight as it can get however constant direct sunlight can also murder it which is why it needs to be visible because out of sight

/out of mind
 
2021-05-04 12:27:25 PM  
I went overboard this year. The gray winter and isolation had me craving color and life, so I overplanted.
I am working on my master gardener certification, so relearning some chemistry and botany.
We are still getting frost, so plants are everywhere between the indoor and outdoor greenhouses, the kitchen, and a few things sprouting safely in the yard.
I grow more than a dozen tomato varieties, herbs, vegetables, and flowers. This year includes a few new novelties like cinnamon thyme and some old favorite novelties, like sweet little cucamelons I will pickle this fall.
I'll post a photo later of my favorite garden feature that's just getting started this year.
Biggest challenges: deer, rabbits, squirrels, birds, and sore joints.
So glad to see this group taking root!
 
2021-05-04 12:30:56 PM  

Be polite walk on the right: don't cut anything off it,get it into a 1' planters pot with fresh potting soil and pick a location outside to put it where it can be easily seen and/or watered because it needs as much sunlight as it can get however constant direct sunlight can also murder it which is why it needs to be visible because out of sight

/out of mind


^this.  I should have been clearer; no cutting until it's re-established itself.  All the dried up root tendrils on the bottom of the bulb have to grow back before it goes from being dormant/dead to back alive.
 
2021-05-04 12:42:53 PM  
yay! gardening!

being an apartment dweller, with shaded east and west exposures, i can't do real veg like tomatoes. i DREAM of garden tomatoes!

but i AM a plant person:

the entranceway plants-
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the lanai plants (see that carpet roll thing? that's going to be the center of a pothos tower i'm building now)
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and the living room plants (below is the "food garden": basil, lemon basil, applemint, peppermint, cilantro, greek oregano, baby garlic chives, and chard for greens)-
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(that potting soil will be part of Pothos Tower soon)

-i FULLY support recurring plant threads!
 
2021-05-04 12:46:58 PM  

anuran: This year sage, beef and onion plant, and moving the saffron bed


Oh man, I want to grow a beef plant!!
 
2021-05-04 12:52:19 PM  

testosteronephobe: anuran: This year sage, beef and onion plant, and moving the saffron bed

Oh man, I want to grow a beef plant!!


beefsteak perilla/shiso?

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beefsteak tomatoes?

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-that's all i got-
 
2021-05-04 1:29:18 PM  

PhineasPozzlesnort: Started growing Habanero's, Ghost Peppers, and Jalapeno's last year.  Mostly using them to make homemade hot sauce and hot honey (which is awesome on pizza, btw).   The Ghost Peppers are a little fussy though.  I do get a few peppers to pop, but nothing like the Habs and Jalepenos which have been doing great.

Turns out the Florida climate they're growing in might not be ideal for them, and they don't really like to flower and drop pods in weather over 90.  So most of what I got from them was in the winter months.

They're mostly for novelty anyway, since they're almost too damn hot to do anything with.


Super hots are almost tempermental enough to make it "not fun" to grow them. The seeds are a pain to start, and the flowers hate my Wisconsin nighttime lows as much as they hate your Florida daytime highs. If I were in FL, I think I'd try growing a plant in a pot right up next to the side of the house that gets plenty of morning sunshine but shade in the afternoon. Bonus if it's in a spot that tends to be breezy. I've had awesome success in pots 13" wide at the top and 11" deep growing Chocolate Bhutlahs, Moruga Blood Scorpions, and Carolina Reapers. The plants are a little smaller but they fill up with lots of brutally hot pods and don't take up a lot of room. They need frequent watering and fertilizing though. I discovered that lots of pepper varieties don't mind a some afternoon shade by accident when I put a large pot that had 4 super chili plants in it right outside my NE facing garage in early May. Every night I'd drag it in to protect them from frost, and every morning I'd drag them back out. It was all part of my plan to have fully ripe hot peppers before 4th of July. The plants ended up thriving there even though they got shade for a big chunk of the day.
 
2021-05-04 1:41:21 PM  

ox45tallboy: I'll start:

What do I do with this?

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You can plant it like that. You will not get another bulb but you can cut the greens and use them. They will keep sprouting as you cut them. I have several in my garden. When they seem to wane, just pull them and start again.
 
2021-05-04 1:47:01 PM  
Plants are ready, but weather and my work schedule means this weekend will be my first shot.

Jalapenos, Habaneros, Romanian Peppers, Cauliflower and a couple herbs this year.

Tiny 150' plot in the backyard, but I setup an in-ground watering solution and use my grass clippings as thatch.

Since my wife decided no tomatoes this year I have to decide if I want to get rid of the maximum security cages we use to protect them from the farking chipmunks. Ohh, those wasteful little bastards.
 
2021-05-04 1:49:34 PM  
Glad there is a gardening thread now.

In NW OR, we had a raised bed, 4'x8', for several years, and had reasonable success.  This year, we tore out the raised bed, and donated it to a coworker, and tilled a 12'x20' plot in the sunny spot in the back yard.  Planning on beans, sweet peppers, serrano peppers, snap peas, corn, tomatoes (Roma & Cherry), squash, zucchini, cucumbers (& pickle size), broccoli rabe, beets (2 types), and swiss chard.  Is a separate large pot we found in the landscaping, we have 2 yukon gold potato plants from a spud that sprouted in the pantry.  Also a small herb bed with sage, thyme and parsley, that's a couple years old.  Added some chives and basil plants to it also.

This is our first true garden plot, so fingers crossed, we get some good stuff out of it.  Going to try and use the shade by the shed to grow the chard, and beets, though there is a little more sun there now.

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/Please don't judge us on our neighbors fence.  He's old and we haven't had time to reskin it.  Plus, cedar prices are nuts now, even in the NW.
 
2021-05-04 1:52:15 PM  
Southwest Arizona here. Currently harvesting tomatoes, apples ( yes really) , asparagus, peppers, squash and the last of the citrus. Beans and melons are growing but not quite there yet. Was over 100° earlier in the week so gotta get the stuff now. The apples will actually start to bake on the tree later in the season.
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2021-05-04 1:53:38 PM  
I've got some beef and onion seeds started , also known as Chinese mahogany or toona sinensis. It's really addictive deep fried !
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2021-05-04 2:01:13 PM  
And, now that it's legal here...
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2021-05-04 2:06:11 PM  
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