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(Food 52)   Fences may make bad neighbors, but walls can make some pretty sweet vertical gardens   (food52.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Plant, The Wall, Annual plant, Green wall, Sustainable building, Garden, Staple, turn succulents  
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411 clicks; posted to Food » on 22 Apr 2021 at 2:56 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



24 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-04-22 12:08:34 PM  
Nice if you can pull it off
 
2021-04-22 12:45:06 PM  
Too many of those designs fail to consider where the water will go once it leaves the pot.
 
2021-04-22 2:45:28 PM  
Bookmark
 
2021-04-22 3:27:17 PM  
huh, list fail without espalier
 
2021-04-22 3:46:01 PM  

Alex_Lee: Too many of those designs fail to consider where the water will go once it leaves the pot.


This. I'd love to have a hydroponic system set up this way though, it would be great.
 
2021-04-22 4:01:35 PM  
I wonder why they omitted those sweet hydroponic vertical towers.
We redesigned our gardens this year and just got a shipment of new Earthboxes, which I swear by. Foods fresh the garden complement the photos for my husband's cooking biz so we grow a lot.
 
2021-04-22 4:04:02 PM  

dodecahedron: Alex_Lee: Too many of those designs fail to consider where the water will go once it leaves the pot.

This. I'd love to have a hydroponic system set up this way though, it would be great.


Oh yeah, a hydroponics system would be cool. I want an Aquaponics system like this one with Koi but I want a pretty Koi pond.

/Also need to win the lottery.
 
2021-04-22 4:05:39 PM  
I'm dying to get plants out of the indoor greenhouse and into the garden IF IT EVER STOPS SNOWING.
 
2021-04-22 4:09:58 PM  

testosteronephobe: I'm dying to get plants out of the indoor greenhouse and into the garden IF IT EVER STOPS SNOWING.


Do you grow stuff in the greenhouse year around? How do you heat it?
 
2021-04-22 4:14:46 PM  

Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: I'm dying to get plants out of the indoor greenhouse and into the garden IF IT EVER STOPS SNOWING.

Do you grow stuff in the greenhouse year around? How do you heat it?


Yes. The lights and ambient temperature are enough warmth inside, even for seedlings.
I don't heat the outside greenhouse and the overgrown plants Inside should be out there by now, but it is still snowing. Another spring like this and I'll get a heater for the outside greenhouse.
 
2021-04-22 4:44:53 PM  

testosteronephobe: Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: I'm dying to get plants out of the indoor greenhouse and into the garden IF IT EVER STOPS SNOWING.

Do you grow stuff in the greenhouse year around? How do you heat it?

Yes. The lights and ambient temperature are enough warmth inside, even for seedlings.
I don't heat the outside greenhouse and the overgrown plants Inside should be out there by now, but it is still snowing. Another spring like this and I'll get a heater for the outside greenhouse.


I have heard about the late snow. I have family in the Lexington Kentucky area and they had what looked like a couple of inches of snow this week. They were a little unhappy about it but the roads were too warm for it to stick so that helps.

That's really great being able to grow stuff all year around in a snowy climate and having your own fresh safe vegetables is amazing. Over this past year we discovered that we can grow some of our vegetables so I want a greenhouse with a jacuzzi in it (attached to the house*). From the research I've done I'm guessing that will be about all the heat it will need - if it is properly designed and built, of course. Once the pandemic is over and I'm not worried about plague rats going through our house we're going to sell this place and move on to the next phase.

*Maybe they call that a solarium?
 
2021-04-22 5:12:45 PM  

Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: I'm dying to get plants out of the indoor greenhouse and into the garden IF IT EVER STOPS SNOWING.

Do you grow stuff in the greenhouse year around? How do you heat it?

Yes. The lights and ambient temperature are enough warmth inside, even for seedlings.
I don't heat the outside greenhouse and the overgrown plants Inside should be out there by now, but it is still snowing. Another spring like this and I'll get a heater for the outside greenhouse.

I have heard about the late snow. I have family in the Lexington Kentucky area and they had what looked like a couple of inches of snow this week. They were a little unhappy about it but the roads were too warm for it to stick so that helps.

That's really great being able to grow stuff all year around in a snowy climate and having your own fresh safe vegetables is amazing. Over this past year we discovered that we can grow some of our vegetables so I want a greenhouse with a jacuzzi in it (attached to the house*). From the research I've done I'm guessing that will be about all the heat it will need - if it is properly designed and built, of course. Once the pandemic is over and I'm not worried about plague rats going through our house we're going to sell this place and move on to the next phase.

*Maybe they call that a solarium?


you would be amazed just how much food you can grow in a tent

ive been doing lettuces for a while and got all the seeds ( toms, carrots, assorted peppers etc) going to get moved out to the garden when it gets a little warmer

greens are super easy. anything fruiting needs a cycle but still doable

indoor cannabis lights are perfect for veggies
 
2021-04-22 5:16:04 PM  

Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: I'm dying to get plants out of the indoor greenhouse and into the garden IF IT EVER STOPS SNOWING.

Do you grow stuff in the greenhouse year around? How do you heat it?

Yes. The lights and ambient temperature are enough warmth inside, even for seedlings.
I don't heat the outside greenhouse and the overgrown plants Inside should be out there by now, but it is still snowing. Another spring like this and I'll get a heater for the outside greenhouse.

I have heard about the late snow. I have family in the Lexington Kentucky area and they had what looked like a couple of inches of snow this week. They were a little unhappy about it but the roads were too warm for it to stick so that helps.

That's really great being able to grow stuff all year around in a snowy climate and having your own fresh safe vegetables is amazing. Over this past year we discovered that we can grow some of our vegetables so I want a greenhouse with a jacuzzi in it (attached to the house*). From the research I've done I'm guessing that will be about all the heat it will need - if it is properly designed and built, of course. Once the pandemic is over and I'm not worried about plague rats going through our house we're going to sell this place and move on to the next phase.

*Maybe they call that a solarium?


https://www.fourseasonssunrooms.com/

we have kind of what you describe. its a roof and sides all glass. ours needs some love but a hot tub dropped in the floor would be sweet.

the room does get pretty hot in the summer fwiw
 
2021-04-22 5:29:48 PM  

Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: I'm dying to get plants out of the indoor greenhouse and into the garden IF IT EVER STOPS SNOWING.

Do you grow stuff in the greenhouse year around? How do you heat it?

Yes. The lights and ambient temperature are enough warmth inside, even for seedlings.
I don't heat the outside greenhouse and the overgrown plants Inside should be out there by now, but it is still snowing. Another spring like this and I'll get a heater for the outside greenhouse.

I have heard about the late snow. I have family in the Lexington Kentucky area and they had what looked like a couple of inches of snow this week. They were a little unhappy about it but the roads were too warm for it to stick so that helps.

That's really great being able to grow stuff all year around in a snowy climate and having your own fresh safe vegetables is amazing. Over this past year we discovered that we can grow some of our vegetables so I want a greenhouse with a jacuzzi in it (attached to the house*). From the research I've done I'm guessing that will be about all the heat it will need - if it is properly designed and built, of course. Once the pandemic is over and I'm not worried about plague rats going through our house we're going to sell this place and move on to the next phase.

*Maybe they call that a solarium?


That sounds lovely! Then who would even care if it snowed?
You could grow amazing tropical plants, like Bird of Paradise showstoppers in a warm, humid space like that. I have some that need constant spraying and praise, but they still may not bloom before I die.
 
2021-04-22 5:47:11 PM  

kindms: Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: I'm dying to get plants out of the indoor greenhouse and into the garden IF IT EVER STOPS SNOWING.

Do you grow stuff in the greenhouse year around? How do you heat it?

Yes. The lights and ambient temperature are enough warmth inside, even for seedlings.
I don't heat the outside greenhouse and the overgrown plants Inside should be out there by now, but it is still snowing. Another spring like this and I'll get a heater for the outside greenhouse.

I have heard about the late snow. I have family in the Lexington Kentucky area and they had what looked like a couple of inches of snow this week. They were a little unhappy about it but the roads were too warm for it to stick so that helps.

That's really great being able to grow stuff all year around in a snowy climate and having your own fresh safe vegetables is amazing. Over this past year we discovered that we can grow some of our vegetables so I want a greenhouse with a jacuzzi in it (attached to the house*). From the research I've done I'm guessing that will be about all the heat it will need - if it is properly designed and built, of course. Once the pandemic is over and I'm not worried about plague rats going through our house we're going to sell this place and move on to the next phase.

*Maybe they call that a solarium?

you would be amazed just how much food you can grow in a tent

ive been doing lettuces for a while and got all the seeds ( toms, carrots, assorted peppers etc) going to get moved out to the garden when it gets a little warmer

greens are super easy. anything fruiting needs a cycle but still doable

indoor cannabis lights are perfect for veggies


We are just beginning to figure out what we can grow and it's actually been fun. (My parents always had a garden and we kids were slave labor so I developed an aversion anything that didn't come from the supermarket produce section.) So far we've had pineapples, strawberries and all kinds of greens, so this second crop we added carrots, snow peas, broccoli, and dill.

I definitely like the look of those solariums I want something that is livable as well as functional because if we're spending that much money on it I want to enjoy it like it is part of the house. It also needs to be a place the cats can enjoy without us worrying about them finding out that there is soil available. You are right about the overheating. I worked summers in greenhouses when I was in college and they used shade cloth to keep them from overheating too much. There will definitely have to be something like that, otherwise we would have poached fish.
 
2021-04-22 5:55:19 PM  

testosteronephobe: Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: I'm dying to get plants out of the indoor greenhouse and into the garden IF IT EVER STOPS SNOWING.

Do you grow stuff in the greenhouse year around? How do you heat it?

Yes. The lights and ambient temperature are enough warmth inside, even for seedlings.
I don't heat the outside greenhouse and the overgrown plants Inside should be out there by now, but it is still snowing. Another spring like this and I'll get a heater for the outside greenhouse.

I have heard about the late snow. I have family in the Lexington Kentucky area and they had what looked like a couple of inches of snow this week. They were a little unhappy about it but the roads were too warm for it to stick so that helps.

That's really great being able to grow stuff all year around in a snowy climate and having your own fresh safe vegetables is amazing. Over this past year we discovered that we can grow some of our vegetables so I want a greenhouse with a jacuzzi in it (attached to the house*). From the research I've done I'm guessing that will be about all the heat it will need - if it is properly designed and built, of course. Once the pandemic is over and I'm not worried about plague rats going through our house we're going to sell this place and move on to the next phase.

*Maybe they call that a solarium?

That sounds lovely! Then who would even care if it snowed?
You could grow amazing tropical plants, like Bird of Paradise showstoppers in a warm, humid space like that. I have some that need constant spraying and praise, but they still may not bloom before I die.


That's a good point, I hadn't thought much about the tropicals beyond making sure that my pineapple plants and the vanilla orchids our neighbor gave us are still happy. I've never tried bird of paradise but I was amazed at the vanilla orchid bloomed and that I was able to pollinate two out of 12 blooms. Unfortunately, I don't think it's going to bloom for me this year, probably needs repotting... again.
The tropical idea opens a whole world of possibilities!
 
2021-04-22 6:14:49 PM  

Alex_Lee: kindms: Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: I'm dying to get plants out of the indoor greenhouse and into the garden IF IT EVER STOPS SNOWING.

Do you grow stuff in the greenhouse year around? How do you heat it?

Yes. The lights and ambient temperature are enough warmth inside, even for seedlings.
I don't heat the outside greenhouse and the overgrown plants Inside should be out there by now, but it is still snowing. Another spring like this and I'll get a heater for the outside greenhouse.

I have heard about the late snow. I have family in the Lexington Kentucky area and they had what looked like a couple of inches of snow this week. They were a little unhappy about it but the roads were too warm for it to stick so that helps.

That's really great being able to grow stuff all year around in a snowy climate and having your own fresh safe vegetables is amazing. Over this past year we discovered that we can grow some of our vegetables so I want a greenhouse with a jacuzzi in it (attached to the house*). From the research I've done I'm guessing that will be about all the heat it will need - if it is properly designed and built, of course. Once the pandemic is over and I'm not worried about plague rats going through our house we're going to sell this place and move on to the next phase.

*Maybe they call that a solarium?

you would be amazed just how much food you can grow in a tent

ive been doing lettuces for a while and got all the seeds ( toms, carrots, assorted peppers etc) going to get moved out to the garden when it gets a little warmer

greens are super easy. anything fruiting needs a cycle but still doable

indoor cannabis lights are perfect for veggies

We are just beginning to figure out what we can grow and it's actually been fun. (My parents always had a garden and we kids were slave labor so I developed an aversion anything that didn't come from the supermarket produce section.) So far we've had pineapples, strawberries and all kinds ...


I just talked to the local guy the other day and to basically replace my entire unit or have a new one full roof and sky lights were both about $30k to give you an idea. this is in the tri-state so perhaps less / more where you are
 
2021-04-22 6:14:56 PM  

Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: I'm dying to get plants out of the indoor greenhouse and into the garden IF IT EVER STOPS SNOWING.

Do you grow stuff in the greenhouse year around? How do you heat it?

Yes. The lights and ambient temperature are enough warmth inside, even for seedlings.
I don't heat the outside greenhouse and the overgrown plants Inside should be out there by now, but it is still snowing. Another spring like this and I'll get a heater for the outside greenhouse.

I have heard about the late snow. I have family in the Lexington Kentucky area and they had what looked like a couple of inches of snow this week. They were a little unhappy about it but the roads were too warm for it to stick so that helps.

That's really great being able to grow stuff all year around in a snowy climate and having your own fresh safe vegetables is amazing. Over this past year we discovered that we can grow some of our vegetables so I want a greenhouse with a jacuzzi in it (attached to the house*). From the research I've done I'm guessing that will be about all the heat it will need - if it is properly designed and built, of course. Once the pandemic is over and I'm not worried about plague rats going through our house we're going to sell this place and move on to the next phase.

*Maybe they call that a solarium?

That sounds lovely! Then who would even care if it snowed?
You could grow amazing tropical plants, like Bird of Paradise showstoppers in a warm, humid space like that. I have some that need constant spraying and praise, but they still may not bloom before I die.

That's a good point, I hadn't thought much about the tropicals beyond making sure that my pineapple plants and the vanilla orchids our neighbor gave us are still happy. I've never tried bird of paradise but I was amazed at the vanilla orchid bloomed and that I was able to pollinate two out of 12 blooms. Unfortunately, I don't think it's going to bloom for me this year, probably needs repotting... again.
The tropical idea opens a whole world of possibilities!


So exciting! Good luck on your garden.
I overplanted this year. Long months of gray days make me crave color and I went a little overboard. I have crates of plants on the floor in one room of the house and more in the kitchen because the greenhouse was groaning and swaying under the weight of too many leaves and too much promise.
Here's to summer!
 
2021-04-22 6:31:11 PM  

testosteronephobe: Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: Alex_Lee: testosteronephobe: I'm dying to get plants out of the indoor greenhouse and into the garden IF IT EVER STOPS SNOWING.

Do you grow stuff in the greenhouse year around? How do you heat it?

Yes. The lights and ambient temperature are enough warmth inside, even for seedlings.
I don't heat the outside greenhouse and the overgrown plants Inside should be out there by now, but it is still snowing. Another spring like this and I'll get a heater for the outside greenhouse.

I have heard about the late snow. I have family in the Lexington Kentucky area and they had what looked like a couple of inches of snow this week. They were a little unhappy about it but the roads were too warm for it to stick so that helps.

That's really great being able to grow stuff all year around in a snowy climate and having your own fresh safe vegetables is amazing. Over this past year we discovered that we can grow some of our vegetables so I want a greenhouse with a jacuzzi in it (attached to the house*). From the research I've done I'm guessing that will be about all the heat it will need - if it is properly designed and built, of course. Once the pandemic is over and I'm not worried about plague rats going through our house we're going to sell this place and move on to the next phase.

*Maybe they call that a solarium?

That sounds lovely! Then who would even care if it snowed?
You could grow amazing tropical plants, like Bird of Paradise showstoppers in a warm, humid space like that. I have some that need constant spraying and praise, but they still may not bloom before I die.

That's a good point, I hadn't thought much about the tropicals beyond making sure that my pineapple plants and the vanilla orchids our neighbor gave us are still happy. I've never tried bird of paradise but I was amazed at the vanilla orchid bloomed and that I was able to pollinate two out of 12 blooms. Unfortunately, I don't think it's going to bloom for me this year, probably needs repotting... again.
The tropical idea opens a whole world of possibilities!

So exciting! Good luck on your garden.
I overplanted this year. Long months of gray days make me crave color and I went a little overboard. I have crates of plants on the floor in one room of the house and more in the kitchen because the greenhouse was groaning and swaying under the weight of too many leaves and too much promise.
Here's to summer!


Thank you! Good luck to you as well and... Yes, here's to summer!
 
2021-04-22 9:15:33 PM  
This is nothing new, I've seen all sorts of variations at Maker's Fairs, County Fairs, Botanical Shows, and even good nurseries.
The one that I do like is the repurposed pallet though. I have a suitable wall and a good source of pallets so it won't be hard to work out. Strip off a bottom board so you can dig the verticals into the ground a little, use two small angle brackets to attach at the top, and install drip hoses that can be run off of a simple garden hose, and let it rip drip grow!

Only thing I would do different is put plastic over the majority of the bottom of the "planters" to retain moisture here in drought land.
 
2021-04-22 11:11:39 PM  

Percise1: This is nothing new, I've seen all sorts of variations at Maker's Fairs, County Fairs, Botanical Shows, and even good nurseries.
The one that I do like is the repurposed pallet though. I have a suitable wall and a good source of pallets so it won't be hard to work out. Strip off a bottom board so you can dig the verticals into the ground a little, use two small angle brackets to attach at the top, and install drip hoses that can be run off of a simple garden hose, and let it rip drip grow!

Only thing I would do different is put plastic over the majority of the bottom of the "planters" to retain moisture here in drought land.


Good way to rot your roots.
 
2021-04-23 12:38:22 AM  
Food52,
Got a hole? Turn it into a mass grave for every one of your navel gazing selves.
 
2021-04-23 7:47:00 AM  
*Ahem*

The phrase is "Good fences make good neighbors."

Get off my lawn!
 
2021-04-23 9:06:23 PM  

testosteronephobe: Percise1: This is nothing new, I've seen all sorts of variations at Maker's Fairs, County Fairs, Botanical Shows, and even good nurseries.
The one that I do like is the repurposed pallet though. I have a suitable wall and a good source of pallets so it won't be hard to work out. Strip off a bottom board so you can dig the verticals into the ground a little, use two small angle brackets to attach at the top, and install drip hoses that can be run off of a simple garden hose, and let it rip drip grow!

Only thing I would do different is put plastic over the majority of the bottom of the "planters" to retain moisture here in drought land.

Good way to rot your roots.


Not in the summer in California. And I did say "majority", not "all". 4" or 6" strips with 1" gaps across the bottom would just mean that they wouldn't dry out in 1 day when it is 103 degrees/9% humidity. Kind of like why our hanging pots with an 8" bottom and a 1" center hole don't rot roots either.

Thank you for the input though.
 
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