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(CNN)   Tyrannosaurus Rex could not drive and arrived to parties late   (cnn.com) divider line
    More: Misc, Dinosaur, T. rex, Miles per hour, role of the T. rex, preferred walking speed, Vrije Universiteit, entire tail of T. rex, specific step rhythms  
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447 clicks; posted to STEM » on 21 Apr 2021 at 6:41 AM (2 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



15 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-04-21 7:14:07 AM  
Or making beds

memegenerator.netView Full Size
 
2021-04-21 7:19:55 AM  

Merltech: Or making beds

[memegenerator.net image 400x226]


That's enough, CeeLo Green
 
2021-04-21 8:06:41 AM  
You know, there is always a lot of back and forth on this.  And I doubt it moved slowly, because we have evidence that it actively hunted as well as scavenged.

How the Tyrannosaurs Ruled the World - with David Hone
Youtube f-jD7kQvyPs


If you watch the whole thing, Dr. Hone points out that T. rex could probably reach Olympic sprinter speeds, and more importantly it could keep it up over a long distance.Fast forward to about 24:00 where he starts talking about the "arctometatarsalian condition".

But hey, science.  The idea that science knows everything is silly, as there are competing ideas.
 
2021-04-21 8:17:52 AM  

LewDux: CeeLo Green


Fark user imageView Full Size

Feel better now?
 
2021-04-21 9:05:56 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-21 9:08:14 AM  

dittybopper: You know, there is always a lot of back and forth on this.  And I doubt it moved slowly, because we have evidence that it actively hunted as well as scavenged.


The article is purely talking about walking speed, when it is trying to minimize energy usage.  They haven't used their method to estimate top speed yet.
 
2021-04-21 9:10:58 AM  
OK, reading TFA, it doesn't say this is about the maximum speed.  This is about the normal walking speed, which isn't all that much different from other animals even today, including humans.

He did not estimate the T. rex's maximum speed in this research but plans to do so using the same method in the future.

Other studies have investigated the dinosaur's running abilities and suggested it could have a top speed of between 12 miles per hour (20 kilometers per hour) and 18 miles per hour (29 kilometers per hour) -- any faster and the bones may have shattered.


Also, in looking it up, I found this which I had missed before:

http://westerndigs.org/tyrannosaur-tr​a​cks-discovered-in-wyoming-reveal-dinos​aurs-speed/

It's a either a juvenile T. rex, or a Nanotyrannus, but either way, it's a tyrannosaurid, and so relevant to the discussion.

We should be working as hard as we can to bring this things back, for the environment's sake.  I mean, who wants to hunt lions and tigers and bears (oh my!) when you can hunt a Tyrannosaurus rex?    We even have ammunition for that kind of thing already:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wi​ki/.577_Tyr​annosaur
 
2021-04-21 9:12:07 AM  

quinxy: dittybopper: You know, there is always a lot of back and forth on this.  And I doubt it moved slowly, because we have evidence that it actively hunted as well as scavenged.

The article is purely talking about walking speed, when it is trying to minimize energy usage.  They haven't used their method to estimate top speed yet.


Yeah, I know, but click-baitey Fark headlines as usual.   That was before I read TFA.  See my subsequent comment.
 
2021-04-21 10:16:04 AM  

dittybopper: You know, there is always a lot of back and forth on this.  And I doubt it moved slowly, because we have evidence that it actively hunted as well as scavenged.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/f-jD7kQv​yPs]

If you watch the whole thing, Dr. Hone points out that T. rex could probably reach Olympic sprinter speeds, and more importantly it could keep it up over a long distance.Fast forward to about 24:00 where he starts talking about the "arctometatarsalian condition".

But hey, science.  The idea that science knows everything is silly, as there are competing ideas.


I just never thought I'd see a Dave Hone fangirl, but here we are
 
2021-04-21 10:29:51 AM  

Dinodork: dittybopper: You know, there is always a lot of back and forth on this.  And I doubt it moved slowly, because we have evidence that it actively hunted as well as scavenged.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/f-jD7kQv​yPs]

If you watch the whole thing, Dr. Hone points out that T. rex could probably reach Olympic sprinter speeds, and more importantly it could keep it up over a long distance.Fast forward to about 24:00 where he starts talking about the "arctometatarsalian condition".

But hey, science.  The idea that science knows everything is silly, as there are competing ideas.

I just never thought I'd see a Dave Hone fangirl, but here we are


Heh.

He's an engaging speaker, and is effective at translating some really nerdy stuff into things someone who is not a paleontologist can understand.  That's the kind of thing we want, right?   Scientists able to effectively communicate science to non-scientists.

He's like the Nick Zentner of paleontology.

Supervolcanoes in the Pacific Northwest
Youtube PlrNNzF_lRU
 
2021-04-21 10:38:29 AM  
There was a really good lecture on Stegosaurs I watched last night, by a female paleontologist, but I'll be damned if I can find it now.  It popped up as a suggestion on YouTube on my Roku, but a search on my work computer is turning up nothing.

You probably know who I'm talking about, dinodork, but her name escapes me.
 
2021-04-21 10:40:53 AM  

dittybopper: There was a really good lecture on Stegosaurs I watched last night, by a female paleontologist, but I'll be damned if I can find it now.  It popped up as a suggestion on YouTube on my Roku, but a search on my work computer is turning up nothing.

You probably know who I'm talking about, dinodork, but her name escapes me.


That's Dr. Susie Maidment. Last time I had a few beers with her was during a fellow Paleo's wedding in October 2019 in Scotland.

Seriously Susie is phenomenal at what she does and really should have more recognition. Maybe if she joined the ranks of the Tyrannobros.
 
2021-04-21 10:42:50 AM  
Found it.   Remembered it was part of the Royal Tyrrell Museum Speaker series (excellent series, I've watched a number of them):

The Stegosaurian Dinosaurs
Youtube HNI9vwQ3POA


Talk by Dr. Susannah Maidment.
 
2021-04-21 10:47:19 AM  

Dinodork: dittybopper: There was a really good lecture on Stegosaurs I watched last night, by a female paleontologist, but I'll be damned if I can find it now.  It popped up as a suggestion on YouTube on my Roku, but a search on my work computer is turning up nothing.

You probably know who I'm talking about, dinodork, but her name escapes me.

That's Dr. Susie Maidment. Last time I had a few beers with her was during a fellow Paleo's wedding in October 2019 in Scotland.

Seriously Susie is phenomenal at what she does and really should have more recognition. Maybe if she joined the ranks of the Tyrannobros.


I agree, at least based upon that talk.

Kind of disappointed that she's pretty much the only one working on Stegosaurs, but I guess given the paucity of specimens, I can kind of understand.

And Dr. Hone makes the point in his Tyrannosaur lecture that there is kind of a feedback loop where people work on a species/genera so we learn more about them, so more questions are raised, so more people work on them, so we learn more, etc.

You know, you should probably fake a British accent.   Make you more famous.
 
2021-04-21 2:58:51 PM  

dittybopper: Dinodork: dittybopper: There was a really good lecture on Stegosaurs I watched last night, by a female paleontologist, but I'll be damned if I can find it now.  It popped up as a suggestion on YouTube on my Roku, but a search on my work computer is turning up nothing.

You probably know who I'm talking about, dinodork, but her name escapes me.

That's Dr. Susie Maidment. Last time I had a few beers with her was during a fellow Paleo's wedding in October 2019 in Scotland.

Seriously Susie is phenomenal at what she does and really should have more recognition. Maybe if she joined the ranks of the Tyrannobros.

I agree, at least based upon that talk.

Kind of disappointed that she's pretty much the only one working on Stegosaurs, but I guess given the paucity of specimens, I can kind of understand.

And Dr. Hone makes the point in his Tyrannosaur lecture that there is kind of a feedback loop where people work on a species/genera so we learn more about them, so more questions are raised, so more people work on them, so we learn more, etc.

You know, you should probably fake a British accent.   Make you more famous.


Meh, I got enough notoriety in the field as it is.
 
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