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(Marketwatch)   How to get your medical records. About 25% of patients find an error - and half of those are clinically important. You have a better success rate at finding them than many of the AI systems healthcare organizations use   (marketwatch.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Health care in the United States, Medicine, Physician, Health, Medical record, Health care, Health informatics, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act  
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201 clicks; posted to STEM » on 19 Apr 2021 at 11:43 AM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-04-19 11:24:18 AM  
My wife's going through significant health issues. She was seeing specialists at the local university hospital but they ran out of ideas and started making assumptions that don't make sense. So, she reached out to Mayo Clinic, who have the very best specialists in the world for her issues.

Mayo needed her records, unsurprisingly. The University uses a system that is incompatible with Mayo, so they sent the records to my wife, who downloaded them, then burned a CD and sent it to Mayo.

The records were in a massive jumble. No apparent order. Several documents scanned upside down or cut off. My wife spent probably six hours sorting them to make some kind of sense. After reading through them, they were rife with inaccurate, incomplete and often completely wrong notes.

It's no wonder the local doctors can't figure out what's happening. Their records are complete shiat.
 
2021-04-19 11:27:26 AM  
A Difficult Patient
Youtube ZJ2msARQsKU
 
2021-04-19 12:01:23 PM  
smbc-comics.comView Full Size
 
2021-04-19 12:02:45 PM  

beezeltown: My wife's going through significant health issues. She was seeing specialists at the local university hospital but they ran out of ideas and started making assumptions that don't make sense. So, she reached out to Mayo Clinic, who have the very best specialists in the world for her issues.

Mayo needed her records, unsurprisingly. The University uses a system that is incompatible with Mayo, so they sent the records to my wife, who downloaded them, then burned a CD and sent it to Mayo.

The records were in a massive jumble. No apparent order. Several documents scanned upside down or cut off. My wife spent probably six hours sorting them to make some kind of sense. After reading through them, they were rife with inaccurate, incomplete and often completely wrong notes.

It's no wonder the local doctors can't figure out what's happening. Their records are complete shiat.


Yeah, now that I have the right to read my notes and see what the docs say, it's clear they aren't listening at all.  They come in, take a glance, make an assumption and everything is either proof of that initial assumption or  proof that I'm must another hysterical female hypochondriac.

Good for your wife, getting someone who might listen.  I'm stuck with what I have, unfortunately.
 
2021-04-19 12:10:10 PM  
What ever happened to the movement to have medical records on a fob for everyone to keep for themselves.
 
2021-04-19 12:28:30 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: beezeltown: My wife's going through significant health issues. She was seeing specialists at the local university hospital but they ran out of ideas and started making assumptions that don't make sense. So, she reached out to Mayo Clinic, who have the very best specialists in the world for her issues.

Mayo needed her records, unsurprisingly. The University uses a system that is incompatible with Mayo, so they sent the records to my wife, who downloaded them, then burned a CD and sent it to Mayo.

The records were in a massive jumble. No apparent order. Several documents scanned upside down or cut off. My wife spent probably six hours sorting them to make some kind of sense. After reading through them, they were rife with inaccurate, incomplete and often completely wrong notes.

It's no wonder the local doctors can't figure out what's happening. Their records are complete shiat.

Yeah, now that I have the right to read my notes and see what the docs say, it's clear they aren't listening at all.  They come in, take a glance, make an assumption and everything is either proof of that initial assumption or  proof that I'm must another hysterical female hypochondriac.

Good for your wife, getting someone who might listen.  I'm stuck with what I have, unfortunately.


FYI, Mayo doctors are "in network" on her insurance (Anthem BCBS), even though they're several states away. She's doing telehealth appointments, now. May travel there for surgery later. Anyway, the point is that you might reach out to Mayo, or Cleveland or any of the top programs for second opinions and you might be able to stay "in network," depending on your coverage. Could be worth checking if a chronic condition isn't getting great results, locally.
 
2021-04-19 12:29:30 PM  

Saiga410: What ever happened to the movement to have medical records on a fob for everyone to keep for themselves.


The organizer of the movement lost their fob and can't unlock their account, now.
 
2021-04-19 12:46:25 PM  
I'd love to look at my medical records.

But first we have to find them wherever the staff member stuck them in someone else's file years ago. So it ain't happening.
 
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