Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Some Guy's Friend)   Any US expats have advice on migrating? New Zealand has always been on the list. What was your experience? How are you getting along? Asking for a friend *cough*   (kiwi.com) divider line
    More: Murica, English-language films, mobile app, numerous refund options, easiest way, one-touch access, carrier self-service, price drops, flight  
•       •       •

187 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 19 Apr 2021 at 8:50 AM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



30 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-04-19 8:28:15 AM  
I don't think they'll let you in if you're coughing
 
2021-04-19 8:29:40 AM  
Make sure you research and understand the tax implications
 
2021-04-19 8:34:41 AM  
1. You will still have to file US taxes every year (though you'll only owe US taxes in addition to paying the country where you live if you make a LOT of money). The US is one of the only countries that has tax requirements for citizens abroad.

And if you are self-employed (NOT if you are an employee of a company), you will likely have to pay 15% of your gross annual income to the US for Social Security -- in addition to whatever you pay your country of residence.

2. If it's a non-Anglo country, learn the farking language. It will be the only way to have a social life that is outside of a small, sad Anglo bubble.

3. If possible, get a second passport from your country of residence. You never know.

Any questions? Feel free to ask.

/ 13 years in Israel
 
2021-04-19 8:40:07 AM  
Be wealthy.

Don't be not wealthy.
 
2021-04-19 8:42:50 AM  

Shostie: Be wealthy.

Don't be not wealthy.


Yeah, I think you need like $1,000,000+ in the bank to show them before they even talk to you about citizenship. I think Australia is similar. I looked years ago and it was something like that.

Funny thing is, a lot of the wealthy bought places down there to go in case of the end of the world, and almost no one went during Covid (if the reporting is accurate).

So, buy a ticket and squat at one of their places. You'll have a free place to stay forever.
 
2021-04-19 8:43:00 AM  

bostonguy: 1. You will still have to file US taxes every year (though you'll only owe US taxes in addition to paying the country where you live if you make a LOT of money). The US is one of the only countries that has tax requirements for citizens abroad.

And if you are self-employed (NOT if you are an employee of a company), you will likely have to pay 15% of your gross annual income to the US for Social Security -- in addition to whatever you pay your country of residence.

2. If it's a non-Anglo country, learn the farking language. It will be the only way to have a social life that is outside of a small, sad Anglo bubble.

3. If possible, get a second passport from your country of residence. You never know.

Any questions? Feel free to ask.

/ 13 years in Israel


I literally want to get to New Zealand. The only way I can see would require me to start a business and maintain it with profit for about 3 years. Something that could employ at least something like 3 or 4 Kiwis full-time.

All the immigration laws are intimidating, all the lists and points are a patchwork of things I don't do. I'd like to bring my family. We don't have enough money to "Invest" our way in. Getting hired by a Kiwi firm when I have no contacts seems legit improbable.

The only other route I can think of would be school. But I'm 40 with a Masters in Education with primary experience working in the IT field that has been a stay-at-home dad for 4 years now.

I tick a lot of the right boxes, but really just don't know where to start, other than an immigration lawyer. I've looked into those in the past, and discussed options in Canada, but a lack of connections always seems to be the biggest hurdle.

I would like to create a 3-year plan to work on to make the actual move. Perfect timing for the kids schooling, etc.
 
2021-04-19 8:59:54 AM  
Just claim refugee status and when that fails, just sneak in.
 
2021-04-19 9:07:00 AM  
Been living in Costa Rica for about 8 years and love it. My two pieces of advice would be (wherever you go) get good and familiar with the residency laws BEFORE you make a move. Also, rent for a year or two instead of buying a home. You would not believe how many people make the mistake of building a big, expensive home only to have it sit on the market for five years after they decide to pack it in.
 
2021-04-19 9:30:11 AM  
My parents lived in NZ for a couple years in the 70s and we've looked into it ourselves. The rules haven't changed much, and are VERY similar for a lot of small, desirable countries (like Switzerland).

In short, you either need a job offer in hand (or can prove long-term remote work) or a huge amount of cash, like $500k liquid to start. For most people, the first one is more realistic.

But it's not just a job offer for NZ, it has to be in one of their areas of "skill shortages" -- ie, a role that they couldn't hire a local to do.

You'll find similar stipulations in the EU, who are far more protectionist of their workforce than we are in the states.

As cool as it all sounds, if you're making a good living in the US, it's hard to do better than here. Many of those other countries rank highly on quality-of-life indices because of how well they provide for their middle and lower classes. So ironically, if you can afford to go to NZ or Switzerland, you probably don't have as much NEED to go there (in terms of being beneficial to you). You really have to WANT to go there for the cultural/travel experience.
 
2021-04-19 9:53:00 AM  
You're not expats, you're immigrants.

Just like the people coming to the US are.
 
2021-04-19 9:58:05 AM  
What makes you think they want you there?
 
2021-04-19 10:06:03 AM  
My brother and his wife retired to Thailand. Like others have said, learn the rules before you go. His wife is from Thailand so the rules don't really affect her. However, my brother can never own property in Thailand. He has to buy their health insurance (which is far better than US insurance) for the monstrous fee of about $100USD per month. He has to have a provable income of $2,500 per month (which is huge by Thai standards) and he has to maintain $19,000 in a Thai bank that he cannot touch. That being said, it is incredibly cheap to live there. Dinner for 2 at a nice restaurant is around $12-15 US. Their mid-morning meal for 2 is $5-7 US. Some things are much more expensive than in the US, especially beer and liquor. He loves it there and never plans to move.
 
2021-04-19 10:10:01 AM  
1.  Make sure to always wear a USA baseball cap.  All foreigners respect America, so you want them to know right away that you're from the Big Dog.

2.  If you're in a country where you don't speak the native language, and someone doesn't understand English, just speak louder.

3.  On your first day in the country, find the biggest guy there and kick his ass.
 
2021-04-19 10:18:26 AM  

Rapmaster2000: 1.  Make sure to always wear a USA baseball cap.  All foreigners respect America, so you want them to know right away that you're from the Big Dog.

2.  If you're in a country where you don't speak the native language, and someone doesn't understand English, just speak louder.

3.  On your first day in the country, find the biggest guy there and kick his ass.


Don't listen to this guy he's all is wrong.  You speak louder AND slower.
 
2021-04-19 10:18:46 AM  
I lived in France and Switzerland for a while in the early 2000s. Understand the tax stuff. If you make over a certain amount, you'll still need to pay Uncle Sam, because, well... I'm not sure why. But you do. Also make sure they'll even take you. You'll likely have to have a shiat-ton of liquid cash in the bank before they'll even consider you. So there's that.
 
2021-04-19 10:21:33 AM  
We lived in Hong Kong for a few years and loved it. Wherever you go, plan ahead. Order-of-operations is very important, and you'll need to have a foot in both worlds until you can get everything switched over.

Aside from logistics recommendations, my main piece of advice is... if you're going to be there, be there. I didn't move my family halfway around the world just to sequester ourselves with a bunch of other white people in DB or Mid-Levels (not that we could have afforded to anyway). There were only a few other gweilo in our building, our kids went to a local school, my wife immediately dove into Chinese cooking, and I spent a lot of time wandering around and hanging out in random neighborhoods. I didn't learned as much Cantonese as I would have liked, but it was enough to surprise local shop owners in Sham Shui Po.
 
2021-04-19 10:33:45 AM  
There's a dress code:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-19 10:57:00 AM  
I sometimes dream of retiring to the UK and living on a narrow canal boat but them I remember I am 6'5
 
2021-04-19 10:57:03 AM  
1-didn't I read bout a decade ago the Kiwis had a law on foreigners buying land?
or did I dream that up?

2-right after high school a friend was recruited by the Chinese government to live there and teach English at schools for kids bout 10 and younger.
She was there for a decade and paid very handsomely.
 
2021-04-19 11:03:50 AM  

snoopy2zero: I sometimes dream of retiring to the UK and living on a narrow canal boat but them I remember I am 6'5


For some reason, the Isle of Mann has always looked good to me.
 
2021-04-19 11:25:48 AM  

freddyV: 1-didn't I read bout a decade ago the Kiwis had a law on foreigners buying land?
or did I dream that up?

2-right after high school a friend was recruited by the Chinese government to live there and teach English at schools for kids bout 10 and younger.
She was there for a decade and paid very handsomely.


Yeah I got offered a ton of money to move to Kuwait after the Gulf war to manage construction projects.  I passed but hooked the recruiter up with a friend of mine.  He made huge bank but couldn't get home fact enough.  He ended up buying a little bar in Key West.
 
2021-04-19 11:27:35 AM  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: freddyV: 1-didn't I read bout a decade ago the Kiwis had a law on foreigners buying land?
or did I dream that up?

2-right after high school a friend was recruited by the Chinese government to live there and teach English at schools for kids bout 10 and younger.
She was there for a decade and paid very handsomely.

Yeah I got offered a ton of money to move to Kuwait after the Gulf war to manage construction projects.  I passed but hooked the recruiter up with a friend of mine.  He made huge bank but couldn't get home fact enough.  He ended up buying a little bar in Key West.


Had a friend who did it. He only did road construction and made mad money
 
2021-04-19 11:48:15 AM  
I heard a story about someone who got a job offer to move to NZ and work there, and he himself passed the physical, but his wife didn't.
 
2021-04-19 2:21:24 PM  
I married a German when I was in the army. When I got out we decided to move back to Germany since it's easier and cheaper to raise kids here. Married 15 years. 11 years living in Germany.

Advice:

Learn the local language.
Work in IT. The company computer guy is allowed to speak broken German I guess.
If you're not good with computers get a TEFL or CELTA certification and teach English.

Western Europe has many nice places to live. Worth looking into.
 
2021-04-19 5:35:24 PM  
Not NZ, but I've bounced between the US and Thailand, in the last 15 years 7 were spent there and I am moving back this year. I came back for family in 2014 and simply visited every summer since I teach. I still have years until I can get a retirement visa and will be getting a visa through work.

Lots of things I love about the US, I am just way happier in Thailand and SE Asia in general.
 
2021-04-19 7:20:24 PM  

bostonguy: 1. You will still have to file US taxes every year (though you'll only owe US taxes in addition to paying the country where you live if you make a LOT of money). The US is one of the only countries that has tax requirements for citizens abroad.

And if you are self-employed (NOT if you are an employee of a company), you will likely have to pay 15% of your gross annual income to the US for Social Security -- in addition to whatever you pay your country of residence.

2. If it's a non-Anglo country, learn the farking language. It will be the only way to have a social life that is outside of a small, sad Anglo bubble.

3. If possible, get a second passport from your country of residence. You never know.

Any questions? Feel free to ask.

/ 13 years in Israel


There will also be a requirement that you declare all your foreign bank accounts and how much you have in each. The so-called FATCA(t) law.
https://www.irs.gov/businesses/corpor​a​tions/foreign-account-tax-compliance-a​ct-fatca
 
2021-04-19 10:59:55 PM  
Other countries don't have an equivalent of the US's Diversity Visa lottery, it's not like New Zealand lets in X number of Americans in every year just for being Americans the same way we let 500-1000 New Zealanders in just for being New Zealanders, so in order to get in you generally have to have a lot of dough, be seeking asylum, or offer something of value to the country. For most American ex-pats that thing of value is "knowlege of English, the world's lingua franca," but they already speak English in New Zealand it's a much tougher row to hoe.
 
2021-04-19 11:43:30 PM  

NikolaiFarkoff: As cool as it all sounds, if you're making a good living in the US, it's hard to do better than here. Many of those other countries rank highly on quality-of-life indices because of how well they provide for their middle and lower classes. So ironically, if you can afford to go to NZ or Switzerland, you probably don't have as much NEED to go there (in terms of being beneficial to you). You really have to WANT to go there for the cultural/travel experience.


For now, anyway. We're probably one bad administration away from it becoming much more urgent though.
 
2021-04-20 3:49:21 AM  
Let's assume New Zealand is an option. Anyone interested in legit spending any time looking at some data and spitballing ideas on how to make it happen over a 3 year period?

I'll update my fark profile bio to include my email address.

I need a second or third brain to try and solve for this. Any help would be much appreciated.
 
2021-04-20 10:46:55 AM  

FarkingStan: Let's assume New Zealand is an option. Anyone interested in legit spending any time looking at some data and spitballing ideas on how to make it happen over a 3 year period?

I'll update my fark profile bio to include my email address.

I need a second or third brain to try and solve for this. Any help would be much appreciated.


If you have your heart set on NZ, NZ has a points system that allows for immigration.  One key caveat is that you need to be under 35 years of age and have skills in desired professions, i.e. IT, accounting, engineering - all types.


The cheapest and easiest work visa for Americans to obtain is the DAFT visa for Netherlands.  It also allows with eligibility  for citizenship in 5 years. The visa costs less ~$3500 euros.  You need to have a business plan for self-employment i.e. be an independent contractor, or open your own business, with no requirement to hire local Dutch folks.  Additionally your spouse can work for NL company with no limitations.
 
Displayed 30 of 30 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.