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(CNN)   Last founding member of the Kingsmen says Oh, no, he gotta go   (cnn.com) divider line
    More: Sad, Grateful Dead, 1960s music groups, Louie Louie, Music critic Dave Marsh, Occupations in music, Music, legendary status, Indiana Gov. Matthew Welsh  
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1964 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 18 Apr 2021 at 11:36 AM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



28 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-04-18 12:07:06 PM  
F*CK!
 
2021-04-18 12:13:58 PM  
CSB:

I once had a coworker who sang "Kiss my black ass" to the "Aye-yi-yi-yi" part of the song, and now, to this day, I often forget that "Kiss my black ass" isn't a real part of the song.
 
2021-04-18 12:38:08 PM  
CSB

There was a house I lived in that was in an area which would have several small town summer events (Seafair for the initiated).

The Kingsmen would perform one year at the concert stage and they were the best and loudest sounding band I recall as I sat on my couch being able to clearly hear Louie Louie through my window.

I had a newborn at the time, otherwise I would have been there tossing my nursing bra on the stage.
 
2021-04-18 12:47:12 PM  
media.defense.govView Full Size


RIP
 
2021-04-18 12:51:32 PM  
Taron Egerton?
 
2021-04-18 12:53:19 PM  

FrancoFile: Taron Egerton?


He's not a founding member.
 
2021-04-18 12:56:00 PM  
I like that the FBI sound lab couldn't figure out the lyrics.
 
2021-04-18 1:04:20 PM  

RatBomb: I like that the FBI sound lab couldn't figure out the lyrics.


The title of the report, if I recall correctly, was "Unintelligible at Any Speed."

Perfect.
 
2021-04-18 1:05:54 PM  

RatBomb: I like that the FBI sound lab couldn't figure out the lyrics.


They could've just bought a copy of the original by Richard Berry on Flip and they would've been able to distinguish every word. I believe he sold the rights to that song for $700 and never received a penny's worth of royalties until years later when he was awarded $2 million. That's showbiz.
 
2021-04-18 1:06:00 PM  
The PNW was a hotbed of protopunk in those days: the Wailers, the Sonics... holy hell, the Sonics. Just listen to "He's Waiting" or "The Witch" and feel the fury of Gerry Roslie's paint-peeling screams.

And further south, Larry Tamblyn's Standells.

Love all those Nuggets-y garage rock bands.
 
2021-04-18 1:13:36 PM  
The True Lyrics to Louie Louie
Youtube wx-8_GI4d2c
the (supposed) F-Bomb is at 58 sec. in.  The drummer apparently dropped a stick and either yelled or swore.
 
2021-04-18 1:26:33 PM  
pics.ballmemes.comView Full Size
 
2021-04-18 1:30:46 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-18 1:42:16 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-18 2:03:05 PM  
I loved their cover of Freebird.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-18 2:34:24 PM  

FlashHarry: The PNW was a hotbed of protopunk in those days: the Wailers, the Sonics... holy hell, the Sonics. Just listen to "He's Waiting" or "The Witch" and feel the fury of Gerry Roslie's paint-peeling screams.

And further south, Larry Tamblyn's Standells.

Love all those Nuggets-y garage rock bands.


Black Keys - Have Love Will Travel
Youtube JnUUrWBwVqQ
 
2021-04-18 3:21:09 PM  

FlashHarry: RatBomb: I like that the FBI sound lab couldn't figure out the lyrics.

The title of the report, if I recall correctly, was "Unintelligible at Any Speed."

Perfect.


And all that time they analyzed it, and they missed the pretty clearly audible "fark!" at around 0:54.
 
2021-04-18 3:43:35 PM  
F the KINGSMEN.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-2CK​s​aq5r8

The original, by African American Richard Berry (cough cultural appropriation cough cough). If Congress actually cared about the lyrics, they'd have just listened to this version, they're perfectly clear.

/the dissonance in the riff is way cooler than the "sanitized for your protection" Kingsmen version.
//stop giving white cover bands credit for black artists
/// nothing funny to say about this for the third slashie
 
2021-04-18 4:50:52 PM  
(cough cultural appropriation cough cough)

Richard Berry was inspired to write the song in 1955 after listening to an R&B interpretation of "El Loco Cha Cha" performed by the Latin R&B group Ricky Rillera and the Rhythm Rockers.[5] The tune was written originally as "Amarren Al Loco" ("Tie Up the Madman") by Cuban bandleader Rosendo Ruiz Jr., also known as Rosendo Ruiz Quevedo, but became best known in the "El Loco Cha Cha" arrangement by René Touzet which included a rhythmic ten-note "1-2-3 1-2 1-2-3 1-2" pattern.[6]

Touzet performed the tune regularly in Los Angeles clubs in the 1950s. In Berry's mind, the words "Louie Louie" superimposed themselves over the repeating bassline. Lyrically, the first person perspective of the song was influenced by "One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)," which is sung from the perspective of a customer talking to a bartender ("Louie" was the name of Berry's bartender).[7] Berry cited Chuck Berry's "Havana Moon" and his exposure to Latin American music for the song's speech pattern and references to Jamaica.[8]

(wikipedia)
 
2021-04-18 5:49:19 PM  

Billy Liar: (cough cultural appropriation cough cough)

Richard Berry was inspired to write the song in 1955 after listening to an R&B interpretation of "El Loco Cha Cha" performed by the Latin R&B group Ricky Rillera and the Rhythm Rockers.[5] The tune was written originally as "Amarren Al Loco" ("Tie Up the Madman") by Cuban bandleader Rosendo Ruiz Jr., also known as Rosendo Ruiz Quevedo, but became best known in the "El Loco Cha Cha" arrangement by René Touzet which included a rhythmic ten-note "1-2-3 1-2 1-2-3 1-2" pattern.[6]

Touzet performed the tune regularly in Los Angeles clubs in the 1950s. In Berry's mind, the words "Louie Louie" superimposed themselves over the repeating bassline. Lyrically, the first person perspective of the song was influenced by "One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)," which is sung from the perspective of a customer talking to a bartender ("Louie" was the name of Berry's bartender).[7] Berry cited Chuck Berry's "Havana Moon" and his exposure to Latin American music for the song's speech pattern and references to Jamaica.[8]

(wikipedia)


So the Kingsmen culturally appropriated a song written by a musician who was influenced by another musician whose song is itself a kind of cultural appropriation (I don't believe Chuck Berry was Jamaican).

Or we could just call it a cover song and say that Richard Berry's version is better.
 
2021-04-18 5:53:09 PM  

AliceBToklasLives: Billy Liar: (cough cultural appropriation cough cough)

Richard Berry was inspired to write the song in 1955 after listening to an R&B interpretation of "El Loco Cha Cha" performed by the Latin R&B group Ricky Rillera and the Rhythm Rockers.[5] The tune was written originally as "Amarren Al Loco" ("Tie Up the Madman") by Cuban bandleader Rosendo Ruiz Jr., also known as Rosendo Ruiz Quevedo, but became best known in the "El Loco Cha Cha" arrangement by René Touzet which included a rhythmic ten-note "1-2-3 1-2 1-2-3 1-2" pattern.[6]

Touzet performed the tune regularly in Los Angeles clubs in the 1950s. In Berry's mind, the words "Louie Louie" superimposed themselves over the repeating bassline. Lyrically, the first person perspective of the song was influenced by "One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)," which is sung from the perspective of a customer talking to a bartender ("Louie" was the name of Berry's bartender).[7] Berry cited Chuck Berry's "Havana Moon" and his exposure to Latin American music for the song's speech pattern and references to Jamaica.[8]

(wikipedia)

So the Kingsmen culturally appropriated a song written by a musician who was influenced by another musician whose song is itself a kind of cultural appropriation (I don't believe Chuck Berry was Jamaican).

Or we could just call it a cover song and say that Richard Berry's version is better.


Exactly.  Except I like the Kingsmen's version better; it's more chaotic.  Iggy's on Metallic K.O. is close behind.
 
2021-04-18 6:53:21 PM  
i prefer Mark Lindsay and the Raidrs version, cause it starts with, :"Grab your woman, its-a Louis Louie time"
 
2021-04-18 7:06:30 PM  

AliceBToklasLives: Billy Liar: (cough cultural appropriation cough cough)

Richard Berry was inspired to write the song in 1955 after listening to an R&B interpretation of "El Loco Cha Cha" performed by the Latin R&B group Ricky Rillera and the Rhythm Rockers.[5] The tune was written originally as "Amarren Al Loco" ("Tie Up the Madman") by Cuban bandleader Rosendo Ruiz Jr., also known as Rosendo Ruiz Quevedo, but became best known in the "El Loco Cha Cha" arrangement by René Touzet which included a rhythmic ten-note "1-2-3 1-2 1-2-3 1-2" pattern.[6]

Touzet performed the tune regularly in Los Angeles clubs in the 1950s. In Berry's mind, the words "Louie Louie" superimposed themselves over the repeating bassline. Lyrically, the first person perspective of the song was influenced by "One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)," which is sung from the perspective of a customer talking to a bartender ("Louie" was the name of Berry's bartender).[7] Berry cited Chuck Berry's "Havana Moon" and his exposure to Latin American music for the song's speech pattern and references to Jamaica.[8]

(wikipedia)

So the Kingsmen culturally appropriated a song written by a musician who was influenced by another musician whose song is itself a kind of cultural appropriation (I don't believe Chuck Berry was Jamaican).

Or we could just call it a cover song and say that Richard Berry's version is better.


media.tenor.comView Full Size


/and let me add two slashies
//Tina Turner
/// "Proud Mary"
 
2021-04-18 8:48:43 PM  
I hope they all repented from their satan worship before they died.
 
2021-04-18 11:50:28 PM  
I think we can all agree, though, that this is the best cover of Louie Louie.

Naked Gun - He'll be alright in a couple of minutes!
Youtube jQts7E1FvrE
 
2021-04-19 1:29:15 AM  

AliceBToklasLives: Billy Liar: (cough cultural appropriation cough cough)

Richard Berry was inspired to write the song in 1955 after listening to an R&B interpretation of "El Loco Cha Cha" performed by the Latin R&B group Ricky Rillera and the Rhythm Rockers.[5] The tune was written originally as "Amarren Al Loco" ("Tie Up the Madman") by Cuban bandleader Rosendo Ruiz Jr., also known as Rosendo Ruiz Quevedo, but became best known in the "El Loco Cha Cha" arrangement by René Touzet which included a rhythmic ten-note "1-2-3 1-2 1-2-3 1-2" pattern.[6]

Touzet performed the tune regularly in Los Angeles clubs in the 1950s. In Berry's mind, the words "Louie Louie" superimposed themselves over the repeating bassline. Lyrically, the first person perspective of the song was influenced by "One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)," which is sung from the perspective of a customer talking to a bartender ("Louie" was the name of Berry's bartender).[7] Berry cited Chuck Berry's "Havana Moon" and his exposure to Latin American music for the song's speech pattern and references to Jamaica.[8]

(wikipedia)

So the Kingsmen culturally appropriated a song written by a musician who was influenced by another musician whose song is itself a kind of cultural appropriation (I don't believe Chuck Berry was Jamaican).

Or we could just call it a cover song and say that Richard Berry's version is better.


i.pinimg.comView Full Size



The K'men (and Raiders) appropriated the Wailers...


Rockin' Robin Roberts & The Wailers - "Louie Louie" (1961)
Youtube ihpGNoCreyg


...which is clearly the best version.
 
2021-04-19 6:17:15 AM  

FlashHarry: The PNW was a hotbed of protopunk in those days: the Wailers, the Sonics... holy hell, the Sonics. Just listen to "He's Waiting" or "The Witch" and feel the fury of Gerry Roslie's paint-peeling screams.

And further south, Larry Tamblyn's Standells.

Love all those Nuggets-y garage rock bands.


Repeating my post in another thread from several days ago, one of the best concerts I ever attended was several years ago, when Mudhoney opened for The Sonics, at The Showbox in Seattle.  The crowd mostly behaved themselves during Mudhoney's set, and then went farking nuts when The Sonics took the stage.  I was reviewing the show for a radio station, and could barely write in my reporter's notepad because people kept crashing into me.  That was one rowdy show.
 
2021-04-19 3:39:04 PM  

Hunchentoot: If Congress actually cared about the lyrics, they'd have just listened to this version, they're perfectly clear.


I never realized it was originally "me gotta go," with him affecting a Jamaican patois. It makes SO much more sense now.

The best version, of course, is from the aforementioned Sonics, who changed the farking chords to make it even tougher!

The Sonics - Louie Louie
Youtube WhM5k_EGzaQ
 
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